100SILEX, de 0 à 100 s: (in
1522 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader
secure tt-rss, tt-rss security 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader July 27, 2015 by Anand Leave a Comment secure-tt-rss-ft Share: share htpcBeginner We recently presented Tiny Tiny RSS to you as a great alternative to Google reader, which is one more way you can extend the functionality of your home server or your hosting space. Hopefully, you already exported your data from Google Reader. In this post, we will show you how to secure TT-RSS reader to prevent unauthorized access. Tiny Tiny RSS is an open source web-based news feed (RSS/Atom) reader and aggregator, designed to allow you to read news from any location, while feeling as close to a real desktop application as possible. As we previously explained, it makes an ideal candidate to replace Google Reader. While there are services like Feedly and Newsblur grabbing the crowd Google Reader, which some of you may prefer, there are a group of people who would like to run a RSS reader on their own server and keep things private. Assuming that you have already installed Tiny Tiny RSS on your alternative to Google reader or hosting space, we will now show you how to secure TT-RSS reader. Secure TT-RSS Reader One of the main reasons to move to an RSS aggregator like TT-RSS is maintaining your privacy. So if you do not secure TT-RSS reader well you are not only making your data available public but also making your system vulnerable to potential attacks. Choosing a strong username and password while setting your TT-RSS is the first basic thing that you can do to secure TT-RSS reader. Listed below are few more ways you can increase TT-RSS reader’s security. 1. Rename TT-RSS Folder One of the first lines of defense is to not use tt-rss in your URL to access your TT-RSS reader. To do this on your hosting account, use a folder name other than tt-rss while installing TT-RSS. On your Linux home server, edit /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf and change the first /tt-rss to something else. An example is shown below. TT-RSS Rename URL TT-RSS Rename URL After making the change, restart your TT-RSS and Apache to apply the changes: sudo service tt-rss restart sudo serivce apache2 reload Your TT-RSS reader is now available through the new URL (example: http://mydomain.com/myreader) only. Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 2. Enable SSL Accessing TT-RSS through http sends all information as unencrypted data. This could mean less privacy due to potential sniffing. The solution is to encrypt the data during transfer, which makes sniffing by hackers harder. To enable and enforce HTTPS access on Linux servers with Apache, install the following run-time libraries: sudo apt-get install libssl0.9.8 libpam0g openssl Restart your Apache server as shown above. You should now be able to access your TT-RSS reader with HTTPS. Note that you may have to have a SSL certificate generated. Refer to Apache documentation if you want to generate your own certificate. By default, the system will install self-signed certificates for you. These certificates are likely to raise warnings when you point your browser to the site. 3. Disable Single User Mode By default the single user mode is already disabled (in /etc/tt-rss/config.php). Enabling single user mode will also disable TT-RSS login system. Therefore, keep the single user mode disabled. Disable Single User Mode Disable Single User Mode A better way to make it a single user system is by limiting the number of registrations to 1 as described below. For whatever reason, you still want to enable single user mode, make sure you implement Apache Authentication method described below. 4. Self Registrations Self registrations allow a visitor to register themselves, which could reduce TT-RSS security. If your TT-RSS will be for personal use only, then you may want to disable user registration by setting “ENABLE_REGISTRATION” to “false”. TT-RSS Self Registrations TT-RSS Self Registrations To further secure TT-RSS Reader, uou may also want to change “REG_MAX_USERS” to “1” to make your account the only account on TT-RSS. asus n66uASUS RT-N66U Dual-Band Wireless-N900 Gigabit Router asus n66u reviewsFind out why it is rated the best wireless router in its class. 5. Apache Authentication Last but not the least, enable Authentication. This is even more important if you have enabled “Single User Mode” describe above. Every time you access TT-RSS, you will be asked for a username and password as shown in the picture below: Secure TT-RSS Reader On your hosting account this equivalent to password protecting a directory, in this case the TT-RSS directory. To do this on your Ubuntu server, you will have to create a .htpasswd file. More information is available in Apache documentation. But the easiest way to achieve this is to use one of the htpasswd generators available online. After you enter the username and password two code blocks will be generated. Copy the contents of the .htpasswd code block and save it to /etc/apache2/.htpasswd_ttrss. Next, copy the contents of the .htaccess code block and add it to /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf as shown below: TT-RSS Apache Authentication TT-RSS Apache Authentication Save and exit. Restart both TT-RSS and Apache previous shown above. You should be prompted for a password every time you try to access TT-RSS. Some may think that this double authentication method is an extra inconvenience. But I would rather be safe than sorry. Go ahead, secure Tiny Tiny RSS Reader and enjoy reading articles on your private secure RSS Reader.
http://www.htpcbeginner.com/secure-tt-rss-reader/

1502 Phone-Reluctant Introverts, There is Nothing Wrong With You
As I sit down to write this blog post there is the dreaded sound of a prolonged vibration as my phone skids, bouncing and sporadically across my desk. This is perfectly ideal and ironic distraction that actually befits the very thing I am thinking about and from which it is distracting me
 Itself! I have always had an absolute detest for talking on the phone. And I’ll say now that it has nothing whatsoever to do with the person at the other end, I just find it a horrible tool for communicating with. Phone Box I think I probably am, and always have been worse than most people when it comes to using the phone (in the traditional sense, ie speaking to people) but if you can identify with any of this then read on. If you’re thinking, “what are you on about, I love the phone” then you’ll probably just get confused, but if you also have friends who ‘never answer the phone’ then this might help you to understand them a bit better. I can’t sum it up any better than Sophia Dembling in her article, 9 Signs that You Might Be an Introvert:
http://www.sheepdressedlikewolves.com/phone-reluctant-introvert/

1467 6AF6, Tube 6AF6; Röhre 6AF6 ID6391, Mag. Eye, 2 ranges, 2 sh
Tube 6AF6 or RĂƒÂƒĂ‚Â¶hre 6AF6 ID6391, Mag. Eye, 2 ranges, 2 shadow angles, Octal (Int.Octal, IO) K8A, USA 1935 and , tubes
http://www.radiomuseum.org/tubes/tube_6af6.html

1227 Tim Stinchcombe - Diode Ladder Filters (including the pretension to 18dB)
Tim Stinchcombe
http://www.timstinchcombe.co.uk/index.php?pge=diode

972 cowon iaudio X5 [topic unique]
pourquoi les balladeurs cowon sont biens ?et le X5 en particulier... -son irrĂ©prochable et puissant (trop pour la lĂ©gislation francaise d'ailleurs, il peut dĂ©passer les 100db, evidemment avec un casque c'est trĂšs mauvais entre les mains de crĂ©tins qui le poussent Ă  fond, mais avec des petites enceintes non-amplifiĂ©es ca peut ĂȘtre utile ) -pas cher du tout par rapport au matos -veritablement UMS et mĂȘme usb on the go -coque entiĂšrement en alu, et design sympa je trouve, qui donne une bonne impression de "plein" -autaunomie! surtout les modĂšles L en quoi ca vaut le coup un L chez cowon? ca sert simplement Ă  passer de 14 heures non-stop Ă  35! -radio FM intĂ©grĂ©e -enregistreur numĂ©rique/dictaphone intĂ©grĂ© -egaliser 5 bandes personalisables, et effets psychoacoustiques -un ecran TFT de qualitĂ© , pas trĂšs grand (160x128), mais il permet un bon bonus, lire des videos, pour de vrai! le X5 n'est pas un video player, (et cowon sort un video player bientĂŽt alors ca aurait pas Ă©tĂ© dans leur intĂ©rĂȘt ) mais pour le mĂȘme prix voire moins cher qu'un sur-populaire ipod, ca peut ĂȘtre sympa quand mĂȘme -capacitĂ© de 20, 30, et bientĂŽt 60Go ; et des modĂšles 30L (alors que les M3L par exemple sont limitĂ©s Ă  20Go) et attention le meilleur sur la fin, support OGG, MP3, WMA,ASF et mĂȘme FLAC, ce qui est dĂ©jĂ  plus rare,ainsi que JPEG et MPEG4!, mais il ne supporte pas les DRM avec le firmware actuel je crois (quelqu'un confirme?) mais Ă©tant assez puissant pour lire des videos, le support de codecs variĂ©s n'est donc limitĂ© que par le firmware en accessoire, -la telecommande la plus complĂšte qui existe sur un player MP3 (la mĂȘme qu'avec un M3 simplement) -une station dock (cradle) -une houssette iaudio sympathique donc pour moi , c'est un balladeur ultime, d'un fabricant corĂ©en encore mĂ©connu des masses, mais jugez par vous mĂȘme la critique unanime: LES REVIEWS >>>prise en main par spaceturtle<<<, avec photos et tĂ©lĂ©commande, ici mĂȘme! http://forum.hardware.fr/forum2.ph [...] w=0&nojs=0 akihabara news (plein de photos) http://www.akihabaranews.com/revue_48.html ZDnet http://www.zdnet.fr/produits/mater [...] m?tab=test generationMP3 http://www.generationmp3.com/forum [...] ntry242882 et encore http://www.generationmp3.com/forum [...] 22069.html DAPreview (in english) http://www.dapreview.net/content.php?review.201 200 photos dans la gallerie iaudiophile (in english) http://www.iaudiophile.net/content.php?review.24.0 bon test avec benchs et tout mp3.com (in english) http://www.mp3.com/tech/players_31447897_review.php sondage X5 vs Ipod, mais qui gagne donc? et de combien? http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-3000_7-6245404.html les commentaires des ipodiens sont hilarants ("si je voulais des fonctions qui servent Ă  rien et 2 heures d'autonomie j'acheterai un archos!" )
http://forum.hardware.fr/hfr/VideoSon/Materiel/unique-iaudio-x5-sujet_85395_132.htm

916 HughLeCaine.com - Bonjour
Biographie On a qualifiĂ© le scientifique et compositeur canadien Hugh Le Caine (1914-1977) de "hĂ©ros" de la musique Ă©lectronique. Il a grandi Ă  Port Arthur (maintenant Thunder Bay) dans le nord-ouest de l'Ontario. TrĂšs tĂŽt, il a commencĂ© Ă  construire des instruments de musique et Ă  expĂ©rimenter avec des appareils Ă©lectroniques. Dans sa jeunesse, il imaginait des "sonoritĂ©s merveilleuses" qu'il pensait pouvoir rĂ©aliser Ă  l'aide de nouvelles inventions Ă©lectroniques. Hugh Le Caine travaillant dans le laboratoire de physique de l'UniversitĂ© Queen Ă  Kingston en Ontario, en 1938 AprĂšs l'obtention de son diplĂŽme de maĂźtrise en science Ă  l'UniversitĂ© Queen en 1939, il s'est joint au Conseil national de recherche du Canada (CNRC) Ă  Ottawa. Il a travaillĂ© au dĂ©veloppement des premiers systĂšmes de radar et en physique atomique, se distinguant comme scientifique et publiant d'importants articles dans ces domaines. Chez lui, il poursuivait ses recherches en musique Ă©lectronique et en gĂ©nĂ©ration de son. Il a montĂ© son studio personnel en 1945 oĂč il a dĂ©butĂ© son travail indĂ©pendant sur la conception d'instruments de musique Ă©lectroniques tels que la sacqueboute Ă©lectronique, un instrument monophonique trĂšs Ă©laborĂ© qui est maintenant reconnu comme le premier synthĂ©tiseur contrĂŽlĂ© par tension. Par la suite, Le Caine a dĂ©veloppĂ© des systĂšmes de contrĂŽle par tension pour une grande variĂ©tĂ© d'applications. En 1948, Le Caine est parti en Angleterre pour quatre ans oĂč il a fait des Ă©tudes en physique, poursuivant son travail en musique Ă©lectronique Ă  son retour au Canada. GrĂące aux dĂ©monstrations publiques de ses instruments, il a obtenu la permission de dĂ©placer ses activitĂ©s musicales au CNRC et de s'y consacrer Ă  plein temps en 1954. Pendant les vingt annĂ©es qui ont suivi, il a construit plus de vingt-deux nouveaux instruments diffĂ©rents. Il a collaborĂ© au dĂ©veloppement de deux des premiers studios de musique Ă©lectronique Ă  l'UniversitĂ© de Toronto (inaugurĂ© en 1959) et Ă  l'UniversitĂ© McGill Ă  MontrĂ©al (inaugurĂ© en 1964). Le laboratoire de Le Caine au CNRC a fourni pratiquement Ă  lui seul l'Ă©quipement pour ces deux premiers studios. Les composantes de la saqueboute ont Ă©tĂ© sĂ©parĂ©es en unitĂ©s indĂ©pendantes - ou modules - permettant au compositeurs de leur assigner une tĂąche spĂ©cifique au sein d'un ensemble. Le Caine a enseignĂ© aux deux universitĂ©s et a influencĂ© toute une gĂ©nĂ©ration de compositeurs de musique Ă©lectroacoustique. Ses nombreux articles et dĂ©monstrations personnelles ont eu un effet catalyseur dans la communautĂ© canadienne et internationale. Il a exercĂ© une influence indirecte sur le dĂ©veloppement du synthĂ©tiseur modulaire Moog par l'entremise de Gustav Ciamaga, qui Ă©tait familier avec les filtres de Le Caine et qui a par la suite encouragĂ© Robert Moog Ă  dĂ©velopper son filtre passe-bas contrĂŽlĂ© par tension. Un des aspects les plus importants des instruments de Le Caine est sans doute leur efficacitĂ© pour la performance, leur maniabilitĂ©. Son obsession pour le "beau son" l'a conduit Ă  concevoir des instruments capables de produire un jeu expressif nuancĂ© caractĂ©ristique de la tradition orchestrale. Il avait un sens aigu des besoins de l'interprĂšte afin que celui-ci puisse exĂ©cuter les gestes qui, selon Le Caine, constituent l'essence de la musique. À cet Ă©gard, la sensibilitĂ© au toucher a Ă©tĂ© un Ă©lĂ©ment essentiel et a Ă©tĂ© utilisĂ©e pour les claviers, les mixeurs et autres composantes, sous des formes d'application mĂ©canique, Ă©lectronique et au moyen de la sensibilitĂ© Ă  la lumiĂšre. Sur ce point, les conceptions de Le Caine Ă©taient tellement avancĂ©es que certaines des possibilitĂ©s qu'il a dĂ©veloppĂ©es n'ont connu d'application commerciale que dans les annĂ©es 1980. IdĂ©alement, un instrument de musique devrait offrir de bonnes qualitĂ©s sonores et une certaine flexibilitĂ© dans son contrĂŽle. Or ces deux objectifs ne sont pas toujours compatibles. Les instruments traditionnels exigent habituellement une longue formation avant que l'interprĂšte puisse tirer parti de leurs qualitĂ©s musicales. Dans la conception de ses instruments Ă©lectroniques, Le Caine a tentĂ© de mettre l'accent sur la maniabilitĂ© de l'instrument sans compromettre l'intĂ©gritĂ© de la musique. Chacune de ses crĂ©ations est une Ă©tude unique sur l'Ă©quilibre et le raffinement. Sur le CD, HUGH LE CAINE, COMPOSITIONS, DOMONSTRATIONS 1946-1974, nous pouvons entendre les enregistrements rĂ©alisĂ©s par Le Caine, oĂč il explore et fait la dĂ©monstration des possibilitĂ©s qu'offrent huit de ses instruments. Dripsody, sa composition de 1955 construite Ă  partir du son d'une seule goutte d'eau, compte encore parmi les exemples les plus jouĂ©s de musique concrĂšte. MalgrĂ© l'accueil favorable que ses compositions ont Ă  juste titre connu, Le Caine a conservĂ© une attitude critique Ă  leur Ă©gard : "Je ne me considĂ©rais pas comme un compositeur. Toutefois, j'ai senti que la seule façon de comprendre l'intĂ©rĂȘt du compositeur pour un instrument Ă©tait de l'utiliser moi-mĂȘme dans les diffĂ©rentes formes musicales actuelles." Son humour dĂ©prĂ©ciateur Ă  l'Ă©gard de lui-mĂȘme est Ă©vident dans certains des titres qu'il a donnĂ©s Ă  ses compositions, tel que A Noisome Pestilence (le titre est un calembours : l'anglais "noisome" signifie rĂ©pugnant ou fĂ©tide, mais suggĂšre Ă©galement "noise" qui signifie bruit, d'oĂč la traduction adoptĂ©e, "Une peste bruyante"). Lorsqu'on lui a demandĂ© pourquoi il avait nommĂ© sa premiĂšre composition Dripsody, il a rĂ©pondu : "Parce qu'elle a Ă©tĂ© Ă©crite par une goutte."
http://www.hughlecaine.com/fr/

776 What Your Web Design Says About You (Infographic)
Infographic that delves into the meanings of fonts and colors in the context of web design. infographics
http://sixrevisions.com/infographics/what-your-web-design-says-about-you-infographic/

706 Geometry, Surfaces, Curves, Polyhedra
POV-Ray: A Tool for Creating Engaging Visualisation of Geometry Various notes on polygons and meshes Includes Surface (polygon) simplification, Clipping a polygonal facet with an arbitrary plane, Surface Relaxation and Smoothing of polygonal data, Mesh crumpling, splitting polygons, two sided facets, polygon types. Philosophy is written in this grand book - I mean universe - which stands continuously open to our gaze, but which cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language in which it is written. It is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles and other geometric figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it; without these, one is wandering about in a dark labyrinth. Galileo (1623) Distance between a point, a line and a plane The intersection of a line with another line (2D) The closest line between two lines (3D) The intersection of a line with a plane Mathematics describing a plane The intersection of two planes The intersection of three planes Polygon area and centroid calculation Inside / outside polygon test Reflection of a ray Direction Cosines Eulers number and closed surfaces Determining whether a line segment intersects a facet Coordinate transformations on the plane (2D) Cartesian, Cylindrical, and Spherical Euler angles and coordinate transformations Converting between left and right coordinate systems Clipping a line with a polygon Clockwise test for polygons in 2D Test for concave/convex polygon in 2D Area of (planar) polygons in 3D Spheres, equations and terminology The intersection of a line and a sphere (or a circle) Equation of the circle through 3 points Equation of the sphere through 4 points Intersecting area of circles on a plane Rotation of a point about an arbitrary axis Creating a plane/disk perpendicular to a line segment Intersection of two circles on the plane Circumference of an ellipse Intersection of two spheres Distributing Points on a Sphere Quadric equations in x and y of degree 2 Fowler angles: Comparing angles without trigonometry Contouring Algorithm Description of an efficient contouring algorithm as it appeared in Byte magazine. (Byte Magazine, 1987) and a more general approach for arbitrary contour planes and polygonal meshes. Spherical projections Methods for mapping points on a spherical surface onto a plane, stereographic and cylindrical (including Mercator) projections. Includes Aitoff map projection: Conversion to/from longitude/latitude (spherical map) Projection types Classification of projections from 3D to 2D and specific examples of oblique projections. A triangle was an improvement to the square wheel. It eliminated one bump. BC comics Planar (stretching) distortion in the plane Including Anamorphic projections and Mappings in the Complex Plane (Otherwise known as Conformal maps) Polygonising a scalar field Otherwise known as marching cubes and marching tetrahedrons. HyperSpace (Historic) A Macintosh 4 dimensional geometry viewer and manual.
http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/geometry/

679 Trevor Marshall's ETI3600, ETI4600 International Music Synthesisers and Maplin 3800 and Maplin 5600s Stereo Synthesisers
Many years ago the Australian magazine "Electronics Today International" published my designs for two partly digital, mostly analog, Electronic Music Synthesisers. the ETI 3600 and ETI 4600. Both were made available as kits of components Barry Wilkinson at ETI was responsible for the final packaging and kitting coordination. Maplin Electronics Ltd.(in the UK) subsequently picked up the designs, which they marketed as as the Maplin models 3800 and 5600s Electronic Music Synthesisers At the time I held two Australian provisional patents for the technologies I used in the Synthesiser designs. One related to the method for generating sawtooth waveforms, the other was for the method of using commutated resistors in voltage controlled filters. I never made any money out of the designs, or the patents, which have long ago been allowed to lapse. But it was fun! The original constructional articles for the ETI 3600/4600 can be found in these PDFs: October 1973, December 1973, January 1974, Feb 1974, March 1974, April 1974, July 1974, March 1975, April 1975, May 1975, August 1975 Although the earliest (4004) microprocessors were available at that time, it was not until the late-70's that I first started programming fully digital (Signetics 2650 based) Microcomputer systems. Consequently my early digital designs were hardware, and not firmware, based. Of course, these days, everything in my hardware and firmware is based on software designs - even the interconnections are controlled by the software in the EPLDs and PALs, instead of by wires. So many things have changed over the years.... Here is a mug shot of the Maplin 3800:
http://www.trevormarshall.com/eti.htm

676 (How to Write a (Lisp) Interpreter (in Python))

http://norvig.com/lispy.html

485 WTF is HTML5 (Infographic)
WTF is HTML5? What is HTML5 and Why We Should All Care (Infographic)
http://www.focus.com/images/view/11905/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality
” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

355 Yamaha CS-30 clock input modification
this modification adds a switch to the cs30 that lets you clock the sequencer with the external input signal. you can still use the internal clock to trigger the envelopes at the same time, for complex modulations. to trigger the envelopes from the external clock (in time with the sequencer), switch them to ext.
http://eatstapes.com/gzifcak/eim/cs30.html

168 Musiques Incongrues - All you can eat - 100 versions of Popcorn song
[img]http://puyopuyo.lautre.net/allyoucaneat.jpg[/img] [b] [size=14]Musique Incongrues world exclusive ! 100 versions of Popcorn online[/b][/size] From a Schling idea with a large base of WFMU blog All you can eat friends ! And you can contribute of course ! Next step 200 !! Favorites so far : Toytone Guyom Shadmehr V. Malone Denki Groove [url=http://conradek.wrzuta.pl/sr/f/57C86ofH7wt/alfred_hause_-_popcorn.mp3]Alfred Hause - Popcorn[/url] [url=http://blogfiles.wfmu.org/KG/popcorn/Anarchic-System-Side-A-Popcorn-Vocal.mp3]Anarchic System - Popcorn (vocal)[/url] [url=http://blogfiles.wfmu.org/KG/popcorn/Anarchic-System-Side-B-Popcorn-Instrumental.mp3]Anarchic System - Popcorn (instrumental)[/url] [url=http://blogfiles.wfmu.org/KG/popcorn/aphex-twin-Popcorn.mp3]Aphex musiques incongrues, da ! heard it records, the brain, egotwister
http://www.musiques-incongrues.net/forum/discussion/1707/all-you-can-eat-100-versions-of-popcorn-song/

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