1078 - The Modular Synth

A long time ago, in a galaxy far away, before your local music shop was packed with the latest digital synths, even before the early analogue monosynths, if you wanted a synthesizer you had to make it yourself. Modular synthesis is not in itself a different type of synthesis, but refers to the fact that a synth would be built up from individual components (modules) , which would be linked together (patched) in a configuration decided by the person doing the building. Compared with today's 'plug and play' synths which come with 100's of presets, GM soundsets, etc, this has the obvious disadvantage that 'recalling' a preset can only be done if your synth is patched together in exactly the same way every time and every controller has to be manually set to the same parameter. However, the big advantage of Modular synthesis, of course, is that, providing you have the right components, you can build practically anything you want, without being constrained by the 'hardwired' configurations of modern factory built synthesizers. The Pulsar/Scope Modular synth, like any other Modular 'soft synth' brings together the advantages of both Modular synths and modern factory built synths. Modular configurations can be saved as patches for total recall later on, and each patch can contain any number of presets, again for later recall. Furthermore, with a software modular, you can re-use each component as many times as you wish within one patch, you never run out of cables, you don't have to dedicate a whole room to the synth and the modules never suffer from physical damage. What's more, each parameter can be controlled by MIDI so parameter changes can be recorded into your sequencer in real-time.

2011-10-06 08:47:14

http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/themodularsynth.shtml


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