100SILEX, de 0 à 100 s: Action
1527 Cthulhu - Action Figures, Toys, Bobble Heads, Collectibles at Entertainment Earth
Accoutrements, Diamond Select, Dreamland Toyworks, Funko, Multiverse Studio, Sd Toys, Surreal Entertainment, Toy Vault, Usaopoly, Warpo Toys, Cthulhu, Action Figures, Apparel, Banks, Bed And Bath, Games, Holiday Ornaments, Key Chains, Mugs, Office, Plush, Pop! Vinyl Figures, Slippers, Statues, Vinyl Figures
http://www.entertainmentearth.com/hitlist.asp?theme=Cthulhu

1502 Phone-Reluctant Introverts, There is Nothing Wrong With You
As I sit down to write this blog post there is the dreaded sound of a prolonged vibration as my phone skids, bouncing and sporadically across my desk. This is perfectly ideal and ironic distraction that actually befits the very thing I am thinking about and from which it is distracting me
 Itself! I have always had an absolute detest for talking on the phone. And I’ll say now that it has nothing whatsoever to do with the person at the other end, I just find it a horrible tool for communicating with. Phone Box I think I probably am, and always have been worse than most people when it comes to using the phone (in the traditional sense, ie speaking to people) but if you can identify with any of this then read on. If you’re thinking, “what are you on about, I love the phone” then you’ll probably just get confused, but if you also have friends who ‘never answer the phone’ then this might help you to understand them a bit better. I can’t sum it up any better than Sophia Dembling in her article, 9 Signs that You Might Be an Introvert:
http://www.sheepdressedlikewolves.com/phone-reluctant-introvert/

1347 Online-REPs-and-REPLs
Action Script 3: http://eval.hurlant.com/demo/ http://wonderfl.net/ Ada: http://ideone.com/ Arc: http://dabuttonfactory.com:8080/ http://jonathan.tang.name/files/arclite/ Assembler: http://ideone.com/ AWK: http://ideone.com/ Bash: http://ideone.com/ BASIC: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html bc: http://ideone.com/ BeanShell: http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ Bloop: http://repl.it/ brainfuck: http://ideone.com/ http://repl.it/ C: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ C#: http://ideone.com/ C++: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ Clojure: http://tryclj.licenser.net/ http://www.try-clojure.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ COBOL: http://ideone.com/ CoffeeScript: http://jashkenas.github.com/coffee-script/ (Click "TRY COFFEESCRIPT") http://repl.it/ Common Lisp: http://ideone.com/ http://biobike.org/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://www.solve-et-coagula.com/As3Lisp.html (subset) D: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ Emacs Lisp: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Emoticon: http://repl.it/ Erlang: http://ideone.com/ F#: http://tryfs.net/ Forth: http://ideone.com/ http://repl.it/ Fortran: http://ideone.com/ Go: http://ideone.com/ http://golang.org/doc/play/ Groovy: http://trygroovy.appspot.com/tutorial http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ Haskell: http://tryhaskell.org/ http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Icon: http://ideone.com/ Io: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Intercal: http://ideone.com/ Java: http://ideone.com/ JavaScript: http://www.squarefree.com/shell/shell.html http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ http://jsconsole.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://repl.it/ http://webshell.io Kaffeine: http://repl.it/ LOLCODE: http://repl.it/ Lua: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://repl.it/ MongoDB: http://try.mongodb.org/ Move: http://repl.it/ Nemerle: http://ideone.com/ Nice: http://ideone.com/ Objective-J: http://cappuccino.org/learn/console/ OCaml: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Oz: http://ideone.com/ Pascal: http://ideone.com/ Perl: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://sunaba.plackperl.org/ Perl6: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html PHP: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Pike: http://ideone.com/ PostScript: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Prolog: http://ideone.com/ Python: http://shell.appspot.com/ http://www.datamech.com/devan/trypython/trypython.py http://www.trypython.org/ http://try-python.mired.org/ http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://ironpython.net/try/ http://www.skulpt.org/ http://doc.pyschools.com/console http://pythonwebconsole.thomnichols.org/ http://repl.it/ QBasic: http://repl.it/ R: http://ideone.com/ Ruby: http://tryruby.org/ http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ http://repl.it/ Scala: http://www.simplyscala.com/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ Scheme: http://sisc-scheme.org/sisc-online.php http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://repl.it/ Smalltalk: http://ideone.com/ Tcl: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Unlambda: http://ideone.com/ http://repl.it/ Visual Basic .NET: http://ideone.com/ Whitespace: http://ideone.com/ See also: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/49092/online-interactive-consoles http://codepad.org/about http://ideone.com/faq http://repl.it/#:help
http://joel.franusic.com/Online-REPs-and-REPLs/

1277 Sonic Visualiser
Sonic Visualiser is a program for viewing and analysing the contents of music audio files. sonic visualiser visualizer visualise visualize audio music spectrogram feature extraction
http://www.sonicvisualiser.org/

1207 GTmetrix | Website Speed and Performance Optimization
GTmetrix is a free tool that analyzes your page's speed performance. Using Page Speed and YSlow, GTmetrix generates scores for your pages and offers actionable recommendations on how to fix them.
http://gtmetrix.com/

1152
RAD 100/16 , electrolytic capacitor, 6,3x11mm, RM 2,5mm , Electrolyte Capacitors, radial Electronics, PC Accessories, Network Technology, Soldering, Tools, Batteries, Components, Technics.
http://www.reichelt.de/Elkos-radial/RAD-100-16/3/index.html?;ACTION=3;LA=20;GROUP=B312;GROUPID=3143;ARTICLE=15101;START=0;SORT=artnr;OFFSET=16;SID=13TVAV2n8AAAIAAC1VUrk301260591e213d22ed185fae17433ac5

1020 GnomeActivityJournal - GNOME Live!
GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Contents GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Overview Code Getting in touch Use cases Grouping and Filtering Features TODO GUI Sprints Architecture Long term goals Video Mockups And Current Usage Sub Pages See Zeitgeist for information about the Zeitgeist engine used internally by the GNOME Activity Journal. Overview The GNOME Activity Journal is a tool for easily browsing and finding files on your computer. It uses Zeitgeist to get information and metadata on what files/websites/contacts/etc. you worked with. Links: Zeitgeist Website, Zeitgeist on Launchpad, GNOME Activity Journal on Launchpad Code The Zeitgeist code is split into two modules: GNOME Activity Journal (GTK+ interface) Project page: https://launchpad.net/gnome-activity-journal Repository: bzr branch lp:gnome-activity-journal Zeitgeist Engine Project page: https://launchpad.net/zeitgeist Repository: bzr branch lp:zeitgeist Getting in touch Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~gnome-zeitgeist-users IRC: #zeitgeist @ irc.freenode.net, #gnome-zeitgeist @ irc.gimp.org Use cases John turns on his computer to work on his seminar paper. Instead of digging through his hierarchal file system, he simply opens up GNOME Activity Journal and clicks on the top item in the "Recently Used Files" list. When he realizes that he can't remember the name of the website that he was reading for research yesterday, he simply looks at the list of files related to his paper and clicks on the website. More at the Zeitgeist Vision page. Grouping and Filtering Our goal is to group/filter the data by: Type of data Source Time Name Tags Neighbouring Data Comments Location of use (GPS) Features Browse activities Drag and Drop (not for links) Tagging Auto tagging Searching Filtering by Dataproviders/Time/Tags Bookmark Data TODO GUI Sprints Add an actions toolbar to quickly share items by email or instant messaging. (See nautilus-share) Architecture Experiment with Tracker, Soylent, and Empathy. Long term goals Better metadata extraction (see some of the sprints above) Integration with other computers and mobile devices. Video Zeitgeist video GAJ video Mockups And Current Usage Some work was done by the City of Largo in the past which replicated some of the features of the Activity Journal. Possibly some of this work can result in ideas for improving the User Interface. Mockups And Usage. Sub Pages /BolzanoIdeas /CityOfLargo /Ideas
http://live.gnome.org/action/show/GnomeActivityJournal?action=show&redirect=GnomeZeitgeist

989 Blog de Hugues Truttmann: Entretien d'embauche et intelligence émotionnelle : la méthode I.D.E.A.L.
Entretien d'embauche et intelligence Ă©motionnelle : la mĂ©thode I.D.E.A.L. Pour un candidat, quelle est la diffĂ©rence entre un entretien d’embauche rĂ©ussi et un entretien d’embauche ratĂ© ? Partons de l’hypothĂšse que 2 candidats de formation et d’expĂ©rience Ă©quivalente passent un entretien pour un mĂȘme poste. Tous les 2 ont eu un entretien avec le mĂȘme recruteur. Pour le premier, le recruteur donne une suite favorable, pour le 2Ăšme, cela n’ira malheureusement pas plus loin, le candidat Ă©tait dans un mauvais jour certainement... Ayant fait passer des entretiens Ă  des centaines de candidats, j’ai constatĂ© que j’ai systĂ©matiquement donnĂ© une suite favorable Ă  ceux qui ont rĂ©ussi Ă  me faire “passer Ă  l’action”, c’est-Ă  dire qu’ils ont suscitĂ© chez moi l’intĂ©rĂȘt, puis le dĂ©sir qui m’a motivĂ© Ă  parler positivement et avec enthousiasme de leur candidature Ă  mes clients. Le candidat qui rĂ©ussit est donc celui qui est capable de transfĂ©rer de la sincĂ©ritĂ©, de l’intĂ©rĂȘt, de la motivation, de l’enthousiame ou toute autre Ă©motion positive. Le candidat qui rate a quant Ă  lui transfĂ©rĂ© des Ă©motions nĂ©gatives (dĂ©sintĂ©rĂȘt, peur, tristesse, ennui, etc...). Une Ă©motion positive fait passer Ă  l’action, une Ă©motion nĂ©gative, jamais. RĂ©ussir un entretien consiste donc Ă  utiliser efficacement son intelligence Ă©motionnelle. Voici une dĂ©finition de l’intelligence Ă©motionnelle : “HabiletĂ© Ă  percevoir et Ă  exprimer les Ă©motions, Ă  les intĂ©grer pour faciliter la pensĂ©e, Ă  comprendre et Ă  raisonner avec les Ă©motions, ainsi qu’à rĂ©guler les Ă©motions chez soi et chez les autres.” Une des composante de cette forme d’intelligence est l’empathie qui est la “capacitĂ© Ă  partager les Ă©motions avec autrui, sans confusion entre soi et l’autre”. Comment activer son intelligence Ă©motionnelle et motiver un recruteur ? En appliquant la mĂ©thode I.D.E.A.L : Cette mĂ©thode n’est pas une technique, mais plutĂŽt une attitude Ă  adopter. Avant chaque entretien dites - vous ceci et APPLIQUEZ - LE ! I Decide to act with Empathy by Asking questions and Listening Soit “Je dĂ©cide d’agir avec empathie en posant des questions et en Ă©coutant” Poser des questions (sincĂšres et honnĂȘtes) permet de garder le contrĂŽle d’un entretien, Ă©couter (sans faire semblant) permet de diriger une conversation et de montrer que l’on s’intĂ©resse Ă  son interlocuteur. Le meilleur des candidats n’est pas celui qui parle le plus, mais celui qui saura vĂ©hiculer une bonne Ă©nergie et des Ă©motions positives dans ses paroles et son attitude. Motiver un recruteur ne consiste pas Ă  savoir se vendre en faisant l’étalage de tous les avantages que l’on peut avoir. Ne faites pas comme ce (mauvais) vendeur de voiture qui vous prĂ©sente toutes les caractĂ©ristiques et superbes options d’une voiture SAUF celle qui va vous faire passer Ă  l’action, c’est - Ă  - dire vous engager en signant un bon de commande ! Posez donc LA question que jamais personne ne pose, mais qui vous fera obligatoirement ressortir du lot : Candidat : “Monsieur le Recruteur, pour ce poste, pourriez-vous me dĂ©crire quel est selon vous le candidat IDEAL ?” > ECOUTE Recruteur : “Pour ce poste le candidat IDEAL doit avoir les qualitĂ©s suivantes :” QualitĂ© A QualitĂ© B QualitĂ© C Etc... Candidat : “De toutes ces qualitĂ©s, quelle est selon vous LA PLUS IMPORTANTE ?" > ECOUTE Recruteur : “Sans AUCUN DOUTE, la qualitĂ© B” Candidat : “J’ai la qualitĂ© B, parce que (prouvez par des FAITS, expĂ©rience, formation, vĂ©cu) et d’autre part j’ai Ă©galement la qualitĂ© A, parce que...... et la qualitĂ© C, parce que...... > PASSAGE A L’ACTION Candidat : “Monsieur le Recruteur, dans ce cas, comment pouvons - nous envisager la suite des Ă©vĂšnements ? Testez, c’est puissant et cela fonctionne !
http://truttmann.blogspot.com/2011/02/entretien-dembauche-et-intelligence.html

920 extraction
« Extraction : action d’extraire, de retirer une chose d’un lieu oĂč elle se trouve enfouie ou enfoncĂ©e. » Le Petit Robert. Un espace d’expĂ©rimentation. Qui rĂ©unit auteurs, poĂštes et musiciens, chercheurs, critiques. Un espace ouvert, qui permet Ă  qui veut d’écouter et de lire, d’analyser et de saisir ce qui se fabrique et se joue discrĂštement. LĂ  oĂč la forme importe encore. Aussi : CrĂ©ations, processus, archives, interviews, rĂ©flexions, chroniques, tentatives.
http://www.0extraction0.net/

857 Poste Italiane - Dovequando
cercare, consegna, monitoraggio, monitorare, pacchi, pacco, paccocelere, posta assicurata, raccomandata, postacelere. paccocelere internazionale
http://www.poste.it/online/dovequando/controller?action=start&subaction=paccocelereinternazionale

819 Divers - DĂ©soxydant CAIG Deoxit D100L (7.4ml)
Divers - Désoxydant CAIG Deoxit D100L (7.4ml) DeoxIT à une action désoxydante rapide qui nettoie, protÚge, lubrifie et améliore la conductivité du métal sur tous les connecteurs et contacts. S'utilise de maniÚre générale pour le traitement des connecteurs, des contacts et d'autres surfaces métalliques, Si la surface du métal est décolorée, la corrosion est sévÚre. Divers , Désoxydant CAIG Deoxit D100L (7.4ml)
http://www.audiophonics.fr/desoxydant-caig-deoxit-d100l-74ml-p-3515.html

727 How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect | Apartment Therapy DC
How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect Mclain Wiesand, a Baltimore-based custom furniture company, has made a name for itself by producing handcrafted pieces that capture the feel of real antiques. One of the techniques they use for aging mirror is wonderfully simple and serves as the inspiration for this how to. Creating an antique mirror effect is an inexpensive way to revamp a flea market find, or add a new layer of interest and depth to an ordinary wall mirror. Almost any type of mirror can be aged using this technique, including mirrored plexiglass. Supplies ‱ Mirrored glass or plexiglass. Due to the type of paint applied to the reflective coating, inexpensive, craft-store mirror works wonderfully. ‱ Latex or other gloves for hand protection. ‱ Paint stripper. Most types work fine. For a less toxic product, Citristrip works well. ‱ Plastic putty spreader or putty knife. ‱ Modern Masters Metal Effects Black Patina. This patina solution is essentially an acid that eats at the reflective surface of the mirror. There are probably other products that work similarly, but Modern Masters products work well and can be found online or in most art supply stores or specialty paint stores. ‱ 1” chip brush (or similar brush). ‱ Silver paint of choice. Steps Step 1: (Image 2, above) Wearing gloves, place mirror face down on cardboard or other protected surface in a well-ventilated area. Apply stripper generously to back of mirror and allow to sit for a few hours, or until paint can be easily removed with plastic scraper. It is not necessary for all of the paint to be removed; generally speaking, 80-90% should suffice. When paint has been stripped, wash mirror with soap and water and allow to dry. Step 2: (Images 3 & 4) Place stripped mirror face down on clean cardboard or other protected surface. Dip chip brush in Modern Masters Metal Patina Solution and gradually apply it to the raw reflective surface of the mirror. As mirror tends to age from the edges inward, it is best to apply patina solution in heavier amounts around the edges of the mirror. In a matter of minutes (or less), the patina solution will begin to eat away at the reflective surface. Other application techniques that produce nice effects are spattering and light directional brushing of patina solution. Continue applying solution until desired level of ageing is achieved. Rinse with water to neutralize the reaction and allow to dry. Step 3: (photos 5 & 6) This next step involves reapplying paint to the back of the mirror. The color paint you choose will be visible through the spots created by the patina solution. The dark areas of aged antique mirrors tend to be a dark silver-grey but depending on the silvering technique used, can range from gold to pale silver to black. One method that produced nice results is a combination of dark and light silver paints, applied randomly (per images). Apply paint until the reflective surface is completely covered.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/how-to/how-to-create-an-antique-mirror-effect-127227

673 40+ Vintage and Retro Photoshop Actions | Freebies
Photoshop actions can be a huge time saver when trying to add a specific effect to a photo. Since WDL is all about helping you save time and be more productive, photoshop
http://webdesignledger.com/freebies/40-vintage-and-retro-photoshop-actions/

621 Patternry | User Interface Design Patterns for Ideas and Inspiration
Patternry, previously known as The UI Pattern Factory, is a resource for everyone who needs to design or develop user interfaces. It is a collection of Web design patterns, best practices, which helps you to find inspiration and design interfaces with great user experience. It is also a user interface gallery full of real world examples of our patterns. design patterns, ui design, user interface, design, interaction patterns, user experience, usability, pattern library, best practices, design inspiration
http://www.patternry.com/

533 The Theory and Technique of Electronic Music
Contents Sinusoids, amplitude and frequency Measures of Amplitude Units of Amplitude Controlling Amplitude Frequency Synthesizing a sinusoid Superposing Signals Periodic Signals About the Software Examples Examples Wavetables and samplers The Wavetable Oscillator Sampling Enveloping samplers Timbre stretching Interpolation Examples Audio and control computations The sampling theorem Control Control streams Converting from audio signals to numeric control streams Control streams in block diagrams Event detection Audio signals as control Operations on control streams Control operations in Pd Examples Automation and voice management Envelope Generators Linear and Curved Amplitude Shapes Continuous and discontinuous control changes Muting Switch-and-ramp Polyphony Voice allocation Voice tags Encapsulation in Pd Examples Modulation Taxonomy of spectra Multiplying audio signals Waveshaping Frequency and phase modulation Examples Designer spectra Carrier/modulator model Pulse trains Pulse trains via waveshaping Pulse trains via wavetable stretching Resulting spectra Movable ring modulation Phase-aligned formant (PAF) generator Examples Time shifts and delays Complex numbers Complex sinusoids Time shifts and phase changes Delay networks Recirculating delay networks Power conservation and complex delay networks Artificial reverberation Controlling reverberators Variable and fractional shifts Fidelity of interpolating delay lines Pitch shifting Examples Filters Taxonomy of filters Low-pass and high-pass filters Band-pass and stop-band filters Equalizing filters Elementary filters Elementary non-recirculating filter Non-recirculating filter, second form Elementary recirculating filter Compound filters Real outputs from complex filters Two recirculating filters for the price of one Designing filters One-pole low-pass filter One-pole, one-zero high-pass filter Shelving filter Band-pass filter Peaking and stop-band filter Butterworth filters Stretching the unit circle with rational functions Butterworth band-pass filter Time-varying coefficients Impulse responses of recirculating filters All-pass filters Applications Subtractive synthesis Envelope following Single Sideband Modulation Examples Fourier analysis and resynthesis Fourier analysis of periodic signals Periodicity of the Fourier transform Fourier transform as additive synthesis Properties of Fourier transforms Fourier transform of DC Shifts and phase changes Fourier transform of a sinusoid Fourier analysis of non-periodic signals Fourier analysis and reconstruction of audio signals Narrow-band companding Timbre stamping (classical vocoder) Phase Phase relationships between channels Phase bashing Examples Classical waveforms Symmetries and Fourier series Sawtooth waves and symmetry Dissecting classical waveforms Fourier series of the elementary waveforms Sawtooth wave Parabolic wave Square and symmetric triangle waves General (non-symmetric) triangle wave Predicting and controlling foldover Over-sampling Sneaky triangle waves Transition splicing Examples Index Bibliography
http://crca.ucsd.edu/~msp/techniques/latest/book-html/book.html

529 SynthesisWorkshops
synth modular Sound synthesis and sound design Music has brought pleasure and entertainment to mankind throughout the whole of history. Each person is by nature equipped with one of the most elaborate and emotional musical instruments; the human voice. Whenever people feel good music seems to fit the occasion, and it is considered quite natural to hum or sing a song. Musical instruments have brought their own moods to music and at the current moment in human evolution there is an enormous variety of musical instruments available. The twentieth century has seen the development of a range of new and exciting electronic musical instruments. These electronic instruments are very flexible, they can produce a wide range of timbres and can be amplified to whatever loudness level sounds best for the occasion. Most of these electronic instruments are played by a keyboard, but in essence the keyboard can be replaced by any electromechanical device that is able to transform a movement caused by a human interaction into an electrical signal that can drive the sound generating core of the electronic instrument. All sorts of technical and scientific developments have helped to create electronic instruments and the human interface to play them. Still, music is an art and not really a hard science, although music and sound have for a long time been subject to various scientific research. An important realization is that science can not really explain why much music is such a pleasure to listen to and such a joy to make. Which is not a bad thing, as probably no one is waiting for science to take the fun out of music by applying formalized rules and templates on what is also subject to ‘feel’. So, although this book covers techniques that lean heavily on scientific research, the application of these techniques will in general be aimed at creating fun. There are a lot of professionals working with sound and even more people that make music for their personal enjoyment. Mastery of sound synthesis is valuable to all of them. Still, it won’t be easy to please everyone with one single book, as some people will be more interested in how things work and others might want practical examples that just work. The aim of this book is that it can at least be used as a practical guide in workshops and courses in electronic music, covering some essential basics that are needed to operate the equipment used in sound synthesis in a way that makes some sense. Additionally it can be used to explore techniques to find out how they can help in the development of one’s own musical style. Sound synthesis is the art of creating sounds by using suitable electronic means, using either analog or digital electronic devices. Sound design is the art of creating particular sounds using sound synthesis techniques. The definition of sound design as used here might be confusing to some, as the name sound design is also used in the discipline in industrial design that occupies itself with how mass produced objects should sound. Examples are how the sound of cars or ladyshaves are ‘designed’ to sound pleasing while in use. Which of course has nothing to do at all with music or sound synthesizers. This book puts the emphasis on the various synthesis techniques for musical purposes and how to setup sound synthesizers to create a large range of characteristic musical sounds. The art of musical sound design is left to the artist.
http://www.xs4all.nl/~rhordijk/G2Pages/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality
” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

480 Formanta Polivoks Synthesizer | Audio Files
The Formanta Polivoks is becoming an increasingly familiar sound to Western ears — it is, for example, all over Franz Ferdinand’s most recent album Tonight. But for those who haven’t heard this mighty Russian beast in action, Sam Inglis created a few examples to accompany Gordon Reid’s Retrozone feature. Formanta Polivoks Synthesizer, Russian synths
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jul10/articles/polivoksaudio.htm

474 Why Intelligent People Fail
Why Intelligent People Fail Content from Sternberg, R. (1994). In search of the human mind. New York: Harcourt Brace. 1. Lack of motivation. A talent is irrelevant if a person is not motivated to use it. Motivation may be external (for example, social approval) or internal (satisfaction from a job well-done, for instance). External sources tend to be transient, while internal sources tend to produce more consistent performance. 2. Lack of impulse control. Habitual impulsiveness gets in the way of optimal performance. Some people do not bring their full intellectual resources to bear on a problem but go with the first solution that pops into their heads. 3. Lack of perserverance and perseveration. Some people give up too easily, while others are unable to stop even when the quest will clearly be fruitless. 4. Using the wrong abilities. People may not be using the right abilities for the tasks in which they are engaged. 5. Inability to translate thought into action. Some people seem buried in thought. They have good ideas but rarely seem able to do anything about them. 6. Lack of product orientation. Some people seem more concerned about the process than the result of activity. 7. Inability to complete tasks. For some people nothing ever draws to a close. Perhaps it’s fear of what they would do next or fear of becoming hopelessly enmeshed in detail. 8. Failure to initiate. Still others are unwilling or unable to initiate a project. It may be indecision or fear of commitment. 9. Fear of failure. People may not reach peak performance because they avoid the really important challenges in life. 10. Procrastination. Some people are unable to act without pressure. They may also look for little things to do in order to put off the big ones. 11. Misattribution of blame. Some people always blame themselves for even the slightest mishap. Some always blame others. 12. Excessive self-pity. Some people spend more time feeling sorry for themselves than expending the effort necessary to overcome the problem. 13. Excessive dependency. Some people expect others to do for them what they ought to be doing themselves. 14. Wallowing in personal difficulties. Some people let their personal difficulties interfere grossly with their work. During the course of life, one can expect some real joys and some real sorrows. Maintaining a proper perspective is often difficult. 15. Distractibility and lack of concentration. Even some very intelligent people have very short attention spans. 16. Spreading oneself too think or too thick. Undertaking too many activities may result in none being completed on time. Undertaking too few can also result in missed opportunities and reduced levels of accomplishment. 17. Inability to delay gratification. Some people reward themselves and are rewarded by others for finishing small tasks, while avoiding bigger tasks that would earn them larger rewards. 18. Inability to see the forest for the trees. Some people become obsessed with details and are either unwilling or unable to see or deal with the larger picture in the projects they undertake. 19. Lack of balance between critical, analytical thinking and creative, synthetic thinking. It is important for people to learn what kind of thinking is expected of them in each situation. 20. Too little or too much self-confidence. Lack of self-confidence can gnaw away at a person’s ability to get things done and become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Conversely, individuals with too much self-confidence may not know when to admit they are wrong or in need of self-improvement.
http://www.acceleratingfuture.com/michael/works/intelligentfailure.htm

444 How Do Americans Save Money? |
Americans have strong sentiments about the importance of savings, but do these sentiments correlate with their actions?
http://www.visualeconomics.com/how-do-americans-save-money_2010-06-22/

386 Forums ARTE Radio
ARTE RADIO En rĂ©action aux sons Pour rĂ©agir Ă  nos reportages, fictions, documentaires, crĂ©ations sonores... Laissez donc vos oreilles s'exprimer ! Compliments et remarques acerbes Un bravo, une critique, un commentaire Ă  adresser Ă  ARTE Radio ? Bien vu : c'est ici. Aide et entraide Le mode d'emploi interactif d'ARTE Radio. Un bug, un bzzz, une suggestion, une incomprĂ©hension ? C'est lĂ  que ça se passe ! CRÉATION Bidouilleurs sonores Quels micros, quels enregistreurs, quels logiciels ? Partagez vos astuces de tournage et techniques de montage. Amoureux de la radio et de l'audio Coups de coeur, coups de rage, annonces et dĂ©nonces... C'est le coin des fondus de la crĂ©ation radiophonique. Audioblogueurs Un forum tout chaud pour les crĂ©ateurs et auditeurs des audioblogs d'ARTE Radio.
http://www.arteradio.com/forum/forums/list.page

377 8BitBoy :: A Flash based Amiga Modplayer
A MOD Player for the Flash Player. flash mod player actionscript chiptunes 8bit 8bitboy amiga tracker
http://8bitboy.popforge.de/

363 45 Photoshop Actions To Enhance Your Photos And Stand Out | Graphic and Web Design Blog
In this article youñ€™re going to find 45 sets of actions that help you enhance the colors and the main look of the photo. photoshop,action,automate,photography,photo,enhance,tutorials Actions come really handy when you have a need to enhance your photos, but you just don’t have a time for it or necessary skills. Photoshop actions contain various adjustment layers, filters, effects, who are originally recorded by author and you can play them back again. You can create actions yourself or you can just download professional ones here and get amazing results with just once click! Explore how the action is built, choose which adjustments you want to apply and finally just enjoy great results. In this article you’re going to find 45 sets of actions that help you enhance the colors and change the main look of Your photo.
http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/tutorials/photoshop-actions-enhance-photos/

312 12 Applications to Make Your Facebook Page More Engaging
Currently, there are more than three million active Facebook Pages on the top ranked site, with the typical Page boasting an average of less than 1,000 fans – oops, I mean ‘likes‘ (seriously, that just doesn’t roll off your tongue quite the same way). Standing out from the static requires you to dress up your Page and make it more interesting and fun for your ‘likers’. That’s where Facebook applications come in. They’re basically like plugins for your Page and there are tens of thousands of them available. Deciding what apps you’d like to incorporate depends on how you’d like to engage with your peeps (that’s an even better word than ‘likers’). Here’s a compilation of some must have applications for any Page. They’re great additions to the the basic layout that Facebook provides and they can be used in interesting ways to move your ‘likes‘ into action.
http://www.socialmediatoday.com/SMC/197503/

305 45 Amazing and Free Photoshop Actions | Vandelay Design Blog
Photoshop actions allow designers and photographers to automate common sequences for increased efficiency. There are countless actions available that can be downloaded for free, and in this post we'll feature 45 of them. Some of these are individual actions and others are sets that include multiple actions. Photoshop Action 15
http://vandelaydesign.com/blog/tools/photoshop-actions/

274 les générateurs de textes
les gĂ©nĂ©rateurs de textes A l’occasion de Lire en FĂȘte, fluctuat.net ouvre une interface dĂ©diĂ©e aux nouvelles formes d’écriture (hypertextualitĂ©, romans interactifs, rĂ©dactions en commun...) et aux modes de lecture Ă©mergeants. Testez le gĂ©nĂ©rateur de texte concoctĂ© par nos soins et dĂ©couvrez ci-dessous notre dossier sur les diffĂ©rentes formes de gĂ©nĂ©rateurs francophones que nous avons trouvĂ©s sur le Web. Nous serons par ailleurs prĂ©sents tout le week-end au Salon de la Revue, Ă  l’Espace Tapis Rouge, 67, rue du Faubourg Saint-Martin, dans le 10Ăšme arrondissement.
http://www.fluctuat.net/livres/liens/generateurs.htm

213 All Design Patterns | Open Source Design Pattern Library
Fluid is an open-source software community Fluid builds user interfaces, designs commonly used interactions, teaches others how to build good user-centred designs, and works with other software projects to integrate our solutions into their applications.
http://uidesignpatterns.org/designPatterns/

196 PayPal - Horror Stories, Lawsuits, PayPal Problems & Information - PayPal Account
paypal, pay pal, ebay paypal, paypal account, paypal.com, paypal coupon, paypal shopping cart, paypal review, paypal credit card, paypal lawsuit, paypal visa, buying paypal, paypal web site, making money with paypal, paypal alternative, paypal class action, paypal settlement, paypal search, paypal fraud, paypal suck, paypal problems
http://www.aboutpaypal.org/home

173 Polaroid Gallery v.1.01
Opensource flash polaroid gallery flash, polaroid, christopher, einarsrud, gallery, xml, dynamic, opensource, flickr feed, actionscript, photo, free
http://www.no3dfx.com/polaroid/

172 Polaroid Gallery v.1.01
Opensource flash polaroid gallery flash, polaroid, christopher, einarsrud, gallery, xml, dynamic, opensource, flickr feed, actionscript, photo, free
http://www.no3dfx.com/polaroid/

80 Forum Emo | Musique | Forums MySpace
Tu recherches le forum Emo | Musique sur MySpace ? Discute de nombreux sujets, crée de nouvelles discussions et donne ton avis. rencontre amis écouter musique gratuite artistes exclusivité clips vidéos fan
http://forums.myspace.com/387.aspx?fuseaction=forums.viewforum

68 The Best Sounds for Getting Work Done - Music - Lifehacker
The right kind of sound can relax your mind, hone your focus, drown out distractions, or get you pumped to kill your to-do list. We've assembled some research and free resources to help you create your own best workspace soundtrack. The Best Sounds for Getting Work Done - Music - Lifehacker, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/5365012/the-best-sounds-for-getting-work-done

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