100SILEX, de 0 ŕ 100 s: Bug
721 DNA seen through the eyes of a coder
This is just some rambling by a computer programmer about DNA. I'm not a molecular geneticist. If you spot the inevitable mistakes, please mail me (bert hubert) at ahu@ds9a.nl. I'm not trying to force my view unto the DNA - each observation here is quite 'uncramped'. To see where I got all this from, head to the bibliography. Quick links: The source code, Position Independent Code, Conditional compilation, Dead code, bloat, comments ('junk dna'), fork() and fork bombs ('tumors'), Mirroring, failover, Cluttered APIs, dependency hell, Viruses, worms, Central Dogma, Binary patching aka 'Gene therapy', Bug Regression, Reed-Solomon codes: 'Forward Error Correction', Holy Code, Framing errors: start and stop bits, Massive multiprocessing: each cell is a universe, Self hosting & bootstrapping, The Makefile, Further reading.
http://ds9a.nl/amazing-dna/

630 Push-Pull :: Synthés + Prod musicale en tous genres...
Mes démos "monomachines" Principe: le morceau est réalisé avec uniquement des sons du synthé en question. Pas d'effets à part un peu de delay ping-pong et un peu de reverb. Pour les synthés monophoniques, les parties poly sont enregistrées voix après voix, à l'ancienne ! Une technique un peu "lourde" mais qui en vaut la peine. Sauf remarque, les parties de batteries sont réalisées avec des sons du synthé concerné. Parfois joués sur le synthé (JP6) ou samplés pour plus de souplesse (MS20, Yusynth). Korg: MS10 - Fade To Grey La rythmique vient d'une TR606, le vocoder est celui du microkorg. MS20 for Couch Potatoes Ma première démo monomachine. MS20 sur une plage bretonne MS20 by Night MS20 - Tribute to Sergei MS20 - Introspection MS20 passé dans le delay Spacebug d'Eowave. MS20 - J'ai froid MS20 - Nazareth Enregistré un 25 décembre, avec un controleur de souffle BC2 Yamaha pour moduler le lead. MS50 - The Last Oscillator Les sons de drum sont des samples d'une Oberheim DX. Roland: SH09 - Solarize JP6 - From Io to Callisto JP8 - La prise de Carthage Les parties de percussions et batteries proviennent de divers softs. Yamaha: CS30 - Hamamatsu Les sons de drum sont issus de divers samples. CS30 - Hamamatsu (drumless) Le même, sans la piste de drum. DX7 - At Night in the Cuyabeno Jungle La nappe de strings discrète qui apparait depuis le millieu du morceau vient d'un Korg Z1. Divers: Clavia micromodular - Face nord Exercice d'imitation d'un MS20. OSCar - From Oxford With Love Les sons de drum sont issus de divers samples. Yusynth/DotCom - Modular Snow Les nappes viennent du Yamaha D85. Yusynth/DotCom - Little Bear Les nappes viennent du Yamaha D85.
http://www.pushpull.ch/demos.htm

464 Ksplice » Attack of the Cosmic Rays! - System administration and software blog
It’s a well-documented fact that RAM in modern computers is susceptible to occasional random bit flips due to various sources of noise, most commonly high-energy cosmic rays. By some estimates, you can even expect error rates as high as one error per 4GB of RAM per day! Many servers these days have ECC RAM, which uses extra bits to store error-correcting codes that let them correct most bit errors, but ECC RAM is still fairly rare in desktops, and unheard-of in laptops. For me, bitflips due to cosmic rays are one of those problems I always assumed happen to “other people”. I also assumed that even if I saw random cosmic-ray bitflips, my computer would probably just crash, and I’d never really be able to tell the difference from some random kernel bug. A few weeks ago, though, I encountered some bizarre behavior on my desktop, that honestly just didn’t make sense. I spent about half an hour digging to discover what had gone wrong, and eventually determined, conclusively, that my problem was a single undetected flipped bit in RAM. I can’t prove whether the problem was due to cosmic rays, bad RAM, or something else, but in any case, I hope you find this story interesting and informative.
http://blog.ksplice.com/2010/06/attack-of-the-cosmic-rays/

440 A List Apart: Articles: Taking Advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 with Modernizr
Ten years ago, only the most cutting-edge web designers used CSS for layouts and styling. Browser support for CSS layouts was slim and buggy, so these people advocated for web standards adherence, while creating hacks that made CSS layouts work in all browsers. One hack that became widely used was browser sniffing: Detecting which browser and version the user had by looking at the navigator.userAgent property in JavaScript. Browser sniffing allowed for quick and easy code forking, allowing developers to target different browsers with different instructions. Today, CSS-based layouts are commonplace and every browser has pretty solid support for them. But now we have CSS3 and HTML5, and the situation is repeating itself—different browsers demonstrate varying levels of support for these new technologies. We’ve smartened up, however, and no longer employ CSS hacks nor use browser sniffing—an unreliable, poor practice. We’ve also convinced more and more clients that websites don’t need to look exactly the same in every browser. So how do we deal with this new but familiar problem? Simple: We use feature detection, which means that we do not ask the browser “who are you?” and make unreliable assumptions from there on. Instead we ask the browser, “can you do this and that?” It’s a simple way to test browser capabilities, but doing all these tests manually all the time gets tiresome. To solve that problem (and others), you can use Modernizr.
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/taking-advantage-of-html5-and-css3-with-modernizr/

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front … if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant Donnés, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

386 Forums ARTE Radio
ARTE RADIO En réaction aux sons Pour réagir à nos reportages, fictions, documentaires, créations sonores... Laissez donc vos oreilles s'exprimer ! Compliments et remarques acerbes Un bravo, une critique, un commentaire à adresser à ARTE Radio ? Bien vu : c'est ici. Aide et entraide Le mode d'emploi interactif d'ARTE Radio. Un bug, un bzzz, une suggestion, une incompréhension ? C'est là que ça se passe ! CRÉATION Bidouilleurs sonores Quels micros, quels enregistreurs, quels logiciels ? Partagez vos astuces de tournage et techniques de montage. Amoureux de la radio et de l'audio Coups de coeur, coups de rage, annonces et dénonces... C'est le coin des fondus de la création radiophonique. Audioblogueurs Un forum tout chaud pour les créateurs et auditeurs des audioblogs d'ARTE Radio.
http://www.arteradio.com/forum/forums/list.page

327 ReclaimPrivacy.org | Facebook Privacy Scanner
Get Informed Keep up with the latest news about privacy policies on Facebook. The Erosion of Facebook Privacy eff.org Facebook Privacy Changes eff.org 7 Things to Stop Doing Now on Facebook yahoo.com Facebook's Gone Rogue wired.com Get Protected This website provides an independent and open tool for scanning your Facebook privacy settings. The source code and its development will always remain open and transparent. Drag this link to your web browser bookmarks bar: Scan for Privacy Go to your Facebook privacy settings and then click that bookmark once you are on Facebook. You will see a series of privacy scans that inspect your privacy settings and warn you about settings that might be unexpectedly public. Follow us on Facebook to hear about the latest updates. Having trouble? Check our help page for tips and video walkthroughs. Get Involved Our mission is to promote privacy awareness on Facebook and elsewhere. Spread awareness to your friends on Facebook by sharing this website with them: Share 128K You can follow us on Twitter too! If you prefer email, you can also sign up for the newsletter to get informed of privacy updates: email: Are you a coder? Contribute to the source code and help to keep the privacy scanner up-to-date. Read Our Own Privacy Policy Our privacy policy is not long: we never see your Facebook data we never share your personal information Simple. The scanner operates entirely within your own browser. Statement of limitation of liability: you use this tool at your own risk, and by using this tool you agree to hold neither ReclaimPrivacy.org (nor its contributors) liable for damage to your Facebook account. However, we do strive to reduce that risk by keeping the source code open and transparent, so that we can identify bugs and quickly fix any functionality. about the author I am an avid Javascript developer and co-founder at Olark (check it out!). You can chat with me about ReclaimPrivacy.org on my website.
http://www.reclaimprivacy.org/

101 - 201