100SILEX, de 0 100 s: Used
1517 THE MUTANT MACHINE Dynamic Analog Percussion Engine
MICROCONTROLLER FREE ANALOG PERCUSSION SYNTHESIS unique Inverter Core oscillators form the MEMBRANE. Each analog oscillator has three waveforms to select from capable of synthesizing everything from heavy-hitting bassdrums to classic 909-style snares and other complex timbres modular design gives the Machine many auxiliary purposes, great for modular sound design of many varieties, and not just percussion the SNAPPY section is comprised of a voltage controlled noise oscillator, for modelling the noisy part of drum timbres both MEMBRANE and SNAPPY elements have an external input for replacing the built-in sound sources, opening up many avenues of possibility 13 control voltage and audio inputs, for a fully modular drum experience 7 audio and CV/gate outputs for maximum integration with other modules dedicated outputs for each WAVE and NOISE oscillator mean you can use the Machine as a complex VCO in your system, when not synthesizing percussion WAVEFORM SCANNING FEATURE GENERATES COMPLEX TIMBRES the MEMBRANE’s waveforms can be scanned through automatically by the wavescanner’s voltage controlled clock generator, or an external clock or VCO can be used SCAN FREQ CV forms a unique form of timbre control, making the Machine act like a complex oscillator at its WAVES output the ENABLE input allows you to gate the wavescanner on and off with a CV or gate signal ARCHITECTURE OF THE MACHINE The Mutant Machine is a dynamic analog instrument capable of generating a wide palette of sounds, ranging from various forms of analog percussion to complex drones and oscillations. To achieve this, the Machine features two synthesis sections which are summed together at the final output: MEMBRANE and SNAPPY. Like the other Mutant Drums, the MEMBRANE and SNAPPY circuits began their mutation as classic analog percussion techniques and have been reimagined for 21st century modular synthesis. The MEMBRANE forms the main body of the sound by way of two analog VCOs, and the SNAPPY section further adds to the timbre by contributing noisy elements to the mix. A noisy CLICK which occurs at the beginning of the SNAPPY sound can have its volume adjusted independent of the main decaying SNAPPY texture. The waveforms which make up the MEMBRANE can be selected manually by button press, or the WAVESCANNER can be used to automatically scan through the available analog waveforms. By modulating the frequency through which waves are scanned, unique, complex sounds are created. Experimentation is encouraged by the many modulation inputs and outputs available to you. The Machine features 8 CV and gate inputs for modulation as well as two external audio inputs, for bringing other modules into the Machine’s core. There are many audio outputs for maximum versatility, allowing you to use the Machine to create drones and alien timbres for use elsewhere in the modular analog system.

1502 Phone-Reluctant Introverts, There is Nothing Wrong With You
As I sit down to write this blog post there is the dreaded sound of a prolonged vibration as my phone skids, bouncing and sporadically across my desk. This is perfectly ideal and ironic distraction that actually befits the very thing I am thinking about and from which it is distracting me… Itself! I have always had an absolute detest for talking on the phone. And I’ll say now that it has nothing whatsoever to do with the person at the other end, I just find it a horrible tool for communicating with. Phone Box I think I probably am, and always have been worse than most people when it comes to using the phone (in the traditional sense, ie speaking to people) but if you can identify with any of this then read on. If you’re thinking, “what are you on about, I love the phone” then you’ll probably just get confused, but if you also have friends who ‘never answer the phone’ then this might help you to understand them a bit better. I can’t sum it up any better than Sophia Dembling in her article, 9 Signs that You Might Be an Introvert:

1442 Projectors, Projector Reviews, LCD Projectors, Home Theater DLP Projectors at ProjectorCentral.com
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1408 » Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Animodule.com
Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Here’s a quick photodoc of how I made a reusable SMT stencil from some aluminum siding I had laying around. It’s very simple to assemble and works great. Dirt cheap too. I had picked up a roll of aluminum flashing a few years ago to flash some chimneys I rebuilt/repointed and was curious to see how it would hold up as an SMT stencil. To buy an SMT stencil frame is near $1000 so I didn’t have much to lose if it didn’t work out. I cut the frame out of some birch plywood since I had some handy. Really any sturdy frame would do the trick. You could easily glue one together out of some 1x or trim board. I put a thicker sheet of aluminum down underneath the flashing to give the CNC endmill something sturdy to cut against and clamped it down stretched and tight. My thought there was that If I cut straight on the MDF it might push on the flashing and bend it before it cut through. A 1mm endmill did the trick. Each pass was .05mm deep. I pulled the Flashing tight and stapled it to the frame. No rocket science here. I taped up the inside edges so no solderpaste could squeeze between the frame and the stencil. I had some old screen print hinge boards so I just attached this frame the same way I would a screen print stencil. The only fiddly part was aligning the first PCB. You have to push around a little and lift the stencil and fiddle with it a little bit. Once I get all the pads lined up correctly I hold it in place and trace around it with a thin tip sharpie marker. Then you place the PCB in the outline. If you have the height adjusted correctly the stencil is sturdy enough to hold the PCB in place while you print the Solderpaste on it. just hold the stencil frame down and it pushes down on the PCB. I used a flexible putty knife as a squeegee. It worked fine. Cleanup was a breeze. Just scrape it off, unscrew the stencil frame from the hingeboard and stick it in the corner till you are ready to do another run.

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM

1333 Download OpenStreetMap data OSM
Commonly Used Formats europe-latest.osm.pbf, suitable for Osmium, Osmosis, imposm, osm2pgsql, mkgmap, and others. This file was last modified 19 hours ago and contains all OSM data up to 2013-05-28T18:59:04Z. File size: 10.3 GB; MD5 sum: c97ac9a7c90bc7791893f19fe9e7e3a3. europe-latest.shp.zip is not available for this region; try one of the sub-regions. Other Formats and Auxiliary Files europe-latest.osm.bz2, yields OSM XML when decompressed; use for programs that cannot process the .pbf format. This file was last modified 5 days ago. File size: 14.9 GB; MD5 sum: 087b5f040c89d6d64ea18503b2723d61. .poly file that describes the extent of this region. .osc.gz files that contain all changes in this region, suitable e.g. for Osmosis updates raw directory index allowing you to see and download older files

1202 CEM (Curtis) SSM Hardware Chips used in these Synthesizers - welcher dsp wo?
List of DSPs, SSM and Curtis Chips in Synthesizers. Eine Liste der Chips in Synthesizern ssm, curtis, chips,dsp,motorola, synthesizer, repair, consequence, moogulator, cem, vcf, vca, dual, vco

1098 Musicians! What are the crappiest pieces of hardware/software you ever used?
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1052 Lab Overview
Not that I recommend this level of excitement to everyone, but this is my lab. It is my basement, and as you may note from the disheveled ceiling tiles up above, having this much equipment has actually forced me to purchase a separate AC unit for the basement. So my trendy two-zone AC house has now magically become a three-zone AC house. Fortunately, I didn't need a furnace for down here. Equipment is great in the winter to heat your house! The lab has taken on a life of it's own over time... It started out as a single standard 7-foot 19" rack. Then it grew to two standard racks... Then it changed into three Ortronics Mighty-Mo 19" rack systems (because those are cool). As seen now, it has changed yet again into four separate rack cabinets. The cabinets are a bit pricey, so they aren't all the same vendor. Note to all, even if you find a really good price on Ebay, be aware that you still have to ship them, and they weigh a LOT! (This means, have lots of friends and lots of pizza/beer!) Nov'04 -- Well, things have moved even more! The equipment was beating the AC unit that ran for the basement. So instead of being a three-level, three-zone house, we had to upgrade to being a four-zone house. Go figure. As noted above, I would not recommend this path to anyone unless you have a good amount of business to drive it! All of the equipment here is used for testing and lab purposes, but easily serves as Proof of Concept lab for many consulting clients of mine. The recent change was that the crawlspace area under the kitchen area was excavated out and had a concrete floor poured making an enclosed little room. In addition, a large air handler (AKA Mongo AC Unit) was put into that specific room and a door was installed for access and physical separation! While all a very interesting project, it is a pain to move any equipment that you amass, so definitely plan ahead for this sort of activity!

1020 GnomeActivityJournal - GNOME Live!
GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Contents GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Overview Code Getting in touch Use cases Grouping and Filtering Features TODO GUI Sprints Architecture Long term goals Video Mockups And Current Usage Sub Pages See Zeitgeist for information about the Zeitgeist engine used internally by the GNOME Activity Journal. Overview The GNOME Activity Journal is a tool for easily browsing and finding files on your computer. It uses Zeitgeist to get information and metadata on what files/websites/contacts/etc. you worked with. Links: Zeitgeist Website, Zeitgeist on Launchpad, GNOME Activity Journal on Launchpad Code The Zeitgeist code is split into two modules: GNOME Activity Journal (GTK+ interface) Project page: https://launchpad.net/gnome-activity-journal Repository: bzr branch lp:gnome-activity-journal Zeitgeist Engine Project page: https://launchpad.net/zeitgeist Repository: bzr branch lp:zeitgeist Getting in touch Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~gnome-zeitgeist-users IRC: #zeitgeist @ irc.freenode.net, #gnome-zeitgeist @ irc.gimp.org Use cases John turns on his computer to work on his seminar paper. Instead of digging through his hierarchal file system, he simply opens up GNOME Activity Journal and clicks on the top item in the "Recently Used Files" list. When he realizes that he can't remember the name of the website that he was reading for research yesterday, he simply looks at the list of files related to his paper and clicks on the website. More at the Zeitgeist Vision page. Grouping and Filtering Our goal is to group/filter the data by: Type of data Source Time Name Tags Neighbouring Data Comments Location of use (GPS) Features Browse activities Drag and Drop (not for links) Tagging Auto tagging Searching Filtering by Dataproviders/Time/Tags Bookmark Data TODO GUI Sprints Add an actions toolbar to quickly share items by email or instant messaging. (See nautilus-share) Architecture Experiment with Tracker, Soylent, and Empathy. Long term goals Better metadata extraction (see some of the sprints above) Integration with other computers and mobile devices. Video Zeitgeist video GAJ video Mockups And Current Usage Some work was done by the City of Largo in the past which replicated some of the features of the Activity Journal. Possibly some of this work can result in ideas for improving the User Interface. Mockups And Usage. Sub Pages /BolzanoIdeas /CityOfLargo /Ideas

1014 Nord Modular Tips & Tricks
synth clavia Nord Modular & Micro Modular V3.03 tips & tricks Welcome to the Nord Modular and Micro Modular 'tips and tricks' section! The workshops of this section are created by a very skilled Nord Modular user: Rob Hordijk. On the 'tips and tricks' pages you will find various information regarding sound synthesis techniques. With every topic comes a workshop where you can follow the practical, non-mathematical, musician-oriented examples. The patches are kept as simple as possible showing only the basic connections. So it's up to you to color the tone to your liking, add modulation, etc., thus turning them into musically useful patches. Occasionally there might be a 'professional' patch as a bonus. If you have a Nord Modular or Nord MicroModular synthesizer you can download the example patches directly from the workshops into the Modular Editor V3.03 program and your synth and play with them. Just click on the patch image to download the actual patch to your Modular. If you do not have a Nord Modular you can download the Modular Editor V3.03 software here and check out the patches visually. Another very skilled Nord Modular/G2 user - Roland Kuit - has made the E-Book "SoundLab". This book covers synthesis techniques from A-Z, history of electronic music and composing techniques. For more info about the SoundLab E-Book, please visit: http://rolandkuit.blogspot.com/Topics available: Basics of sound synthesis on the Nord Modular This extensive section describes the basics of synthesis. (By Rob Hordijk) Basic synthesis Oscillator synchronisation This topic covers hardsync, softsync, FM-sync and VOSIM, a special application of sync. (By Rob Hordijk) Sync workshop Frequency Modulation This topic covers different types of FM, like linear FM, Phase Modulation and fixed formant FM. (By Rob Hordijk) FM Workshop Using the delay module It's too short for echos, but it's a valuable tool that can be used in a variety of ways, creating both sound effects as well as physical models of plucked string sounds and resonant bodies. (By Rob Hordijk) Delay Module Workshop Using logic modules Mastering those yellow connections. (By Rob Hordijk) Logic Workshop

949 simple algorithms
Hi. This is a place to find information about some of the more fundamental algorithms used in computer science. This information is widely available on the net, but hopefully the way it's presented and discussed here will resonate with you. Most of these are things you wouldn't need to write yourself. Modern libraries and languages tend to have quality implementations for all of this. Nonetheless, I truly believe that understanding how things work is key to improving how we work. Enjoy.

926 Used Synthesizers | Shop used Synthesizers for sale
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905 CEM (Curtis) SSM Hardware Chips used in these Synthesizers - welcher dsp wo?
List of DSPs, SSM and Curtis Chips in Synthesizers. Eine Liste der Chips in Synthesizern ssm, curtis, chips,dsp,motorola, synthesizer, repair, consequence, moogulator, cem, vcf, vca, dual, vco

897 Generic Synth Preset Storage and Conversion
For my synths with preset storage and the ability to dump & load presets via midi sysex, I wanted to be able to feed the sysex of a synth into a software program which can display the sound parameters in a meaningful form, and convert the sound into the sysex format of any of my other presets synths The generic patch storage format must display meaningful values for the parameters (filter envelope amount = 1/2 octave, envelope 1 attack = 50ms, etc) and convert between these values and a given synth's sysex (as much as possible - resolution probably isn't good enough to get envelope attack to exactly 50ms on each and every synth, and envelope shapes vary between synths, etc). The storage format will also store the original parameters, using the "native" value range of each parameter (e.g. filter cutoff frequency between 0 and 127) as well as the original sysex program as an ASCII hex dump. Since I didn't find any software which could do this, I began writing my own in Java. I am concentrating on converting basic analog components; any on-board effects are not used.

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.

865 Evolver.html
Just Beautiful! What an amazing instrument! The DSI Evolver has the signature "old school" timbre down pat as well as being able to provide digital timbres reminiscent of the Waldorf Q. There's certainly a "rougher" side available as well with all the feedback implementation and controled distortion. Being able to make PM type plucked and blown sounds is just icing on the cake. Dave Smith should be commended for a job well done. Just have a look at the Panel Layout to get a taste of what this beauty can dish out - the controls are pretty much laid out in the form of a signal path graphic. Be sure to visit Dave Smith's Website! Evolver Sound Examples There are a lot of demos of the Evolver on the web showcasing the gutsy harsh sounds of this beast so I decided to post demos of some of my own patches as examples of the "softer" more "vintage" side of the Evolver's timbre. I make no apologies for these unpolished recordings - these are merely sound samples ;) Resonant Plucked Pad This pad shows some of the rich resonant nature of the filter. Soft Lead This is a simple analog brass lead patch. FM Pad A fun patch with lots of motion made using my "Audio-rate Filter FM" programming tip below. Warm Pad A nice bland-vanilla pad ^_^ What can I say? I love pads... For more MP3 demos showing the full gamut of sounds the Evolver and Polyevolver are capable of, please visit the excellent website of Stefan Trippler! The Definitive Guide to Evolver This rather in-depth guide to the Evolver goes places and does things a mere manual can't. This labor-of-love was crafted by Anu Kirk and with his kind permission, I am offering this fantastic resource right here in PDF format! A much smaller version (400K) is here but it dosen't have internal hyperlinks. Programming Tips Here's a fun repository of programming tips for the Evolver in all its incarnations. Please email me if you would like to add some. Fingered Wave Sequence Submitted by Dave Bryce. This brilliant technique has to be heard to be believed! Plus, its one of those cool things unique to the Evolver! This particular tip is so full of detailed information that it gets its own page! Audio-rate Filter FM Submitted by James Maier. Use the "Audio Mod" parameter in the Filter section to frequency-modulate the cutoff with the analog oscillator. Add resonance until the filter is just on the edge of oscillation then mod the cutoff with just a little triangle LFO set at a very slow speed. Amazing moving chorusing pad and lead sounds can be made this way. Fatter Bass/Pad Sounds Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the same sound in both channels (detuned saws, for instance). With the filters at the 24dB setting, increasing resonance cuts the passband as on the Moog filters. Set Envelope 3 to minimum attack, maximum decay and release, and sustain to maximum. This "creates" an offset, a continuous "on" signal while the keys are gated. Modulate one filters' resonance up (just one), or of the overall resonance level is high, us it to modulate one filters' resonance to its minimum. You get the resonant character plus the size of the non-resonant filter. Use Tri and Sine waves on that side too. "Warmer" Sounds Submitted by James Maier. The Evolver can make many ultra-bright and buzzy sounds due to its extensive feedback and distortion stages but sometimes people miss the subtler side of the beast. For a warmer sound use little or no distortion, close the filter just a bit and turn off the feedback and delay lines. I've managed to get dead-on Prophet5 timbres this way. Adding "Punch" Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the envelopes to linear, and use a Mod to modulate AmpEnv All by itself (lin through log responses with positive and negative self-modulation). This is of course fun on the filter envelopes as well. More Vintage Character Submitted by Mike Peake. Oscillator Slop, set at 5, doesn't come close to the Moog and other old-timer movement, so add slight (1 or 2) LFO to pitch modulations, with individual LFOs per oscillator, and a touch of LFO to LFO rate modulation. A tad of Envelope 3 to pitch helps as well. Don't miss out on the 12dB filter setting Submitted by Mike Peake. The 24dB setting has much more resonance, but the 12dB setting can sound nice and plucky, and do nice slightly fuzzy pads etc. DSI Evolver Waveshape Charts Below are charts I've assembled of the digital waveforms and their spectra as currently used in the DSI Evolver synthesizers. Originally these waves were unique to the SCI ProphetVS vector synth. I find these waveform/spectra graphics really usefull when programming sounds - maybe you will as well. Pay special attention to the spectra as this info is sometimes much more useful than waveshape in determining actual timbre - even before you hear what the waveform sounds like. These are designed to be downloaded (right-click & "save target as"), and printed at 300dpi on 8.5" x 11" pages - don't resize these images before printing or you will lose useful detail. Use them as a handy refrence. This information was cobbled together from various scattered sources (with very special thanks to Achim Gratz!). Any errors or omissions are my own. ^_^ HAVE FUN!!! Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 As far as the origin of these waves is concerned, one of the original VS engineers, Chris Meyer, said: "The original waves for the VS were created three ways - extracting single-cycles from sampled sounds, using a custom additive synthesis program, and using a program Josh (Josh Jeffe, another VS engineer) slapped together called "Hacker" where you could draw the waveshape. These were fed straight from the computer through the filter and VCA of a Pro-One to figure out what they might sound like in a patch. And by the way, no PPG waveforms appear inside the VS - we had access to them, but in the end our consciences got the better of us. We did steal some waveforms from the Korg DW6000, but only by looking at the harmonic drawings on the front panel and trying to imitate them in our additive synthesis program." Modulation Matrix "Cheat Sheet" This chart shows all the modulation routing available on the Evolver. This same info is available in the manual but this can be printed on a single sheet of paper as a handy refrence! Evolver Wallpaper These I created just for fun and desktop "beautification" ;) 1280 X 1024 1024 X 768 800 X 600

817 Coil : Colour Sound Oblivion : DVD 15 & 16 : Peter Christopherson/Coil : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive
Coil's 16 DVD box set Colour Sound Oblivion featured many live shows. The final two discs featured the projections used in the live shows, these were published...

812 ED102 - Octave-Volts-Hertz
The ED102 borrows heavily from the Korg MS-02™ although it was developed independently of Korg Inc. Korg and MS-02 are the trademarks of Korg Inc. Among presently available music synthesizers, there are two different types of control system used for controlling devices such as the VCO (voltage controlled oscillator) and VCF (voltage controlled filter). These two systems been: Hertz/Volt (Hz/V) and Octave/Volt (Oct/V). The graph to the left shows the relationship between the VCO oscillator frequency (pitch) and the control voltage (keyboard output voltage). The straight line on the graph is from a synthesizer in which there is a one octave change for every one volt change in the control voltage (Oct/V). In contrast, the curved line on the graph is the control voltage from a synthesizer in which the VCO frequency is proportional to voltage (Hz/V system). To allow these systems to work together you will need a module like this ED102. The built-in, fully adjustable log amp and anti-log amp ensure complete system flexibility and compatibility between any presently voltage controlled synthesiser. The Hz/V system In the Hz/V system, the VCO oscillator frequency is proportional to the control voltage so that, for example, if the frequency of a VCO increases by 100Hz for every volt applied, then applying 1V, 2V and 3V to this VCO would generate 100Hz, 200Hz and 300Hz respectively. The Oct/V system In the Oct/V system the VCO oscillator frequency changes one octave for every one volt change in the control voltage so that, for example, 1V, 2V and 3V to a VCO would generate 200Hz, 400Hz and 800Hz respectively. Features and Functions Log Amp: This changes a Hz/V type keyboard CV (control voltage) output into an OCT/V type of CV. Use the Log Amp to change the control signal from, say, a Korg or Yamaha synthesiser into a signal you can use with another type of synthesizer. Antilog Amp: This changes an OCT/V type of keyboard CV output into a Hz/V type of CV. Use this Antilog Amp when you want to control, say, a Korg synthesiser by means of a unit that uses the OCT/V system.

788 Setting Up Your Digital Camera For HDR Shooting
You’ve probably heard of High Dynamic Range (HDR) Photography, it’s made quite an entrance into the world of digital photography. If you haven’t, the HDR process is accomplished by taking multiple exposures of a high contrast scene (usually a landscape or cityscape), at different levels of brightness, and then combining the best light from each exposure into one image. The end result is a stunning image that very closely resembles how the human eye views a scene. This process of digital manipulation has caused a bit of controversy and debate in the world of photography, especially with images that are “over-cooked.” One thing is for sure though, HDR is here to stay. When done right, this unique and in depth processing technique can produce beautiful works of art that mimic the way we view and remember a landscape or scene. The above image is an example of what HDR processing can produce. This image, taken from the Big Island of Hawaii, would not be possible without HDR processing. It was taken around noon, the harshest light of the day. The first image is the best image my camera could produce given the situation. While still beautiful, there are obvious problems. Get ready, this article is going to show you how to take your digital camera and turn it into an HDR shooting machine!

772 16 Step Sequencer (With improved PCB) (+/-9V to +/-15V)
Article by Ray Wilson Back to "Music From Outer Space" Analog Synth Pages Watch Thomas White's Excellent Sequencer Videos on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EU6d24_eZ08 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvZi-YMvHRE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5cx6Z7wDOg Thomas White used the MFOS sequencer boards to produce this incredible rotary sequencer. Visit his site to keep up with his latest awesome projects. Features Improved PC board (far less kludging). Produces sequences of 4 to 16 steps in length Modes include stop at count, reverse at count, reset at count and random 16 mode Each step has coarse tune, fine tune, and switchable gate Accepts external clock and external start pulse. Simultaneous outputs with and without portamento. Forward, Back, and Reset controls ease sequence set up. Introduction Please see the pages at 16 Step Analog Sequencer Circuit for details regarding circuit descriptions etc. This page is here soley as a vehicle to present the new PC boards and support board purchases. The schematic and PCBs presented here incorporate all of the improvements and modifications shown on the previous sequencer pages. Panel to board wiring is presented here. Please browse the entire page before ordering board to ensure you understand the circuit and there is enough information provided here for you to successfully complete the project prior to purchasing PC boards. Thanks.

746 40 Essential CSS Templates, Resources and Downloads | Speckyboy Design Magazine
Every web developer should have in their toolbox a collection of CSS tools and resources like the ones outlined in this article. A set of techniques that you rely on and that are always at the ready to cover any possible eventuality. You will find not a selection of the latest innovative CSS techniques (there are some) in this article, merely a collection of tools, resources and downloads that can be used by web designers for solutions to everyday CSS design and coding solutions. The resources below have been split into four categories: CSS Download Packages (all of the CSS resources offer multiple variations of each technique), Downloadable CSS Tools (the resources within this category offers specialized templates), Web, Mobile & Form Frameworks (+ tools and templates to help you get started with each); Feature-Rich and Outstanding Mobile & Web Templates and finally, a selection of tools to help with cross browser compatibility. We don’t presume that this is an ultimate collection, merely a selection of resources we have found to be indispensable. We are positive we have missed a few, and would love to hear about the tools and resources you rely upon.

741 17 Useful Htaccess Tricks and Tips
I have collected 17 htaccess methods in this article which I have used or tested it before, and I think some of them are essential tricks and tips to protect your webserver against malicious attacks and other would able to perform simple tasks efficiently such as redirection and web server optimization. queness,kevin liew,tips, tools

727 How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect | Apartment Therapy DC
How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect Mclain Wiesand, a Baltimore-based custom furniture company, has made a name for itself by producing handcrafted pieces that capture the feel of real antiques. One of the techniques they use for aging mirror is wonderfully simple and serves as the inspiration for this how to. Creating an antique mirror effect is an inexpensive way to revamp a flea market find, or add a new layer of interest and depth to an ordinary wall mirror. Almost any type of mirror can be aged using this technique, including mirrored plexiglass. Supplies • Mirrored glass or plexiglass. Due to the type of paint applied to the reflective coating, inexpensive, craft-store mirror works wonderfully. • Latex or other gloves for hand protection. • Paint stripper. Most types work fine. For a less toxic product, Citristrip works well. • Plastic putty spreader or putty knife. • Modern Masters Metal Effects Black Patina. This patina solution is essentially an acid that eats at the reflective surface of the mirror. There are probably other products that work similarly, but Modern Masters products work well and can be found online or in most art supply stores or specialty paint stores. • 1” chip brush (or similar brush). • Silver paint of choice. Steps Step 1: (Image 2, above) Wearing gloves, place mirror face down on cardboard or other protected surface in a well-ventilated area. Apply stripper generously to back of mirror and allow to sit for a few hours, or until paint can be easily removed with plastic scraper. It is not necessary for all of the paint to be removed; generally speaking, 80-90% should suffice. When paint has been stripped, wash mirror with soap and water and allow to dry. Step 2: (Images 3 & 4) Place stripped mirror face down on clean cardboard or other protected surface. Dip chip brush in Modern Masters Metal Patina Solution and gradually apply it to the raw reflective surface of the mirror. As mirror tends to age from the edges inward, it is best to apply patina solution in heavier amounts around the edges of the mirror. In a matter of minutes (or less), the patina solution will begin to eat away at the reflective surface. Other application techniques that produce nice effects are spattering and light directional brushing of patina solution. Continue applying solution until desired level of ageing is achieved. Rinse with water to neutralize the reaction and allow to dry. Step 3: (photos 5 & 6) This next step involves reapplying paint to the back of the mirror. The color paint you choose will be visible through the spots created by the patina solution. The dark areas of aged antique mirrors tend to be a dark silver-grey but depending on the silvering technique used, can range from gold to pale silver to black. One method that produced nice results is a combination of dark and light silver paints, applied randomly (per images). Apply paint until the reflective surface is completely covered.

709 PrePal - The largest online listing of used musical instrument prices
The largest online listing of used musical instrument prices, updated every day. prepal,used,preowned,worth,value,price,price guide,for sale,music,musical,musician,instrument,gear,music gear,musical equipment,guitar,bass,rack mount,keyboard,synth,synthesizer,sampler,drum,amp,effects,news,information

704 What Is User Experience Design? Overview, Tools And Resources - Smashing Magazine
Websites and Web applications have become progressively more complex as our industry’s technologies and methodologies advance. What used to be a one-way static medium has evolved into a very rich and interactive experience. But regardless of how much has changed in the production process, a website’s success still hinges on just one thing: how users perceive it. “Does this website give me value? Is it easy to use? Is it pleasant to use?” These are the questions that run through the minds of visitors as they interact with our products, and they form the basis of their decisions on whether to become regular users. User experience design is all about striving to make them answer “Yes” to all of those questions. This guide aims to familiarize you with the professional discipline of UX design in the context of Web-based systems such as websites and applications. [Offtopic: by the way, did you know that we are publishing a Smashing eBook Series? The brand new eBook #3 is Mastering Photoshop For Web Design, written by our Photoshop-expert Thomas Giannattasio.]

691 visualizing.org
Visualizing.org is a community of creative people working to make sense of complex issues through data and design… and it’s a shared space and free resource to help you achieve this goal. Why Visualizing.org? By some estimates, we now create more data each year than in the entirety of prior human history. Data visualization helps us approach, interpret, and extract knowledge from this information. Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen government agencies, NGOs, and companies open up their data for the public to see and use. And we’ve seen data visualization figure more prominently in design curricula, conference programs, and the media. We created Visualizing.org because we want to help connect the proliferation of public data… with a community that can help us understand this data… with the general public. What is Visualizing.org? What can I do on the site? For designers: Visualizing is a place to showcase your work, get feedback, ensure that your work is seen by lots of people and gets used by teachers, journalists, and conference organizers to help educate the public about various world issues Visualizing is a free resource to search for data Use Visualizing to keep up with and be inspired by the latest work from other designers and design schools Learn about new visualization tools, blogs, books and other resources to help your work Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike License For teachers and schools: Visualizing is a place to exhibit the collective work of your students, organize assignments and class projects, and help your students find data for their own visualizations We’re working on new tools to help you share teaching material with other teachers As an Academic Partner, your students are eligible to participate in various design competitions – we’re hosting the first Visualizing Marathon in New York in October To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For bloggers and journalists: Visualizing is a resource to find data visualizations about a wide variety of world issues to inform and accompany your own reporting – and it’s easy to embed visualizations and widgets from Visualizing on your own site For conference organizers: As a Knowledge Partner, Visualizing allows you to use data visualizations at your conferences under a Creative Commons License To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For all: Visualizing is a new and fun online resource to learn more about the world in all its complexity and inter-dependence -- and become more comfortable with data and how it can be visually represented How does it work? The site is open and free to use. Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. Simply put, this means that anyone can share, copy, remix, or build upon the visualization as long as: (i) it is used non-commercially; and (ii) the visualization’s creator and source are credited.

679 Trevor Marshall's ETI3600, ETI4600 International Music Synthesisers and Maplin 3800 and Maplin 5600s Stereo Synthesisers
Many years ago the Australian magazine "Electronics Today International" published my designs for two partly digital, mostly analog, Electronic Music Synthesisers. the ETI 3600 and ETI 4600. Both were made available as kits of components Barry Wilkinson at ETI was responsible for the final packaging and kitting coordination. Maplin Electronics Ltd.(in the UK) subsequently picked up the designs, which they marketed as as the Maplin models 3800 and 5600s Electronic Music Synthesisers At the time I held two Australian provisional patents for the technologies I used in the Synthesiser designs. One related to the method for generating sawtooth waveforms, the other was for the method of using commutated resistors in voltage controlled filters. I never made any money out of the designs, or the patents, which have long ago been allowed to lapse. But it was fun! The original constructional articles for the ETI 3600/4600 can be found in these PDFs: October 1973, December 1973, January 1974, Feb 1974, March 1974, April 1974, July 1974, March 1975, April 1975, May 1975, August 1975 Although the earliest (4004) microprocessors were available at that time, it was not until the late-70's that I first started programming fully digital (Signetics 2650 based) Microcomputer systems. Consequently my early digital designs were hardware, and not firmware, based. Of course, these days, everything in my hardware and firmware is based on software designs - even the interconnections are controlled by the software in the EPLDs and PALs, instead of by wires. So many things have changed over the years.... Here is a mug shot of the Maplin 3800:

678 Top 10 Most Useful CSS3 Generators To Write Clean Code Easily
Compilation of most useful and used CSS3 Generators for lazy web designers and web developers. If you don't want to write code, use these best css3 generators. best css3 generators, useful css3 generators, css3 generators to write css3 code,resources,top 10,design

602 Free Music Friday – Circuit Ben « GetLoFi – Circuit Bending Synth DIY
Circuit Ben is Killing Music Album now is free to download. Enjoy great catchy tunes and top notch production. This is a very good example melodic composition with circuit bent toys. Circuit_Ben_is_Killing_Music Download Background Info: Bent Stuff used: Casio sk1, Casio sk5, Casio sk100, Casio pt-20, Casio ks-03, Yamaha pss-11, Yamaha pss460, Hing Hon EK-001, Cheburashka!, Jim Bowen/Al Pacino dub siren, Super ultra mega, Fun-box (orgasm toy), Toy Koran (Quran), Cheap Chinese phone toys, Kung Fu toy, Captain Scarlet’s car, “Pound Shop” keyboard (cost £1 new.), Dragonball Z keyrings, Barbie keyboard, Fisher-price tape recorder (now dirty,dirty guitar amp.), George W Bush and probably about fifty circuits with a soldered output that were bent/killed while recording – auto-destruct! Non Bent Stuff: Mini Kaoss pad, Gameboy with Nanoloop, Melodica, 5-litre oil can guitar, Acoustic bass, Casio kx-101, Stylophone, Voice Ben Says that in general songs are as vague as possible and about nothing – that’s the story he is sticking to The Lyrics for “Allen” are from “Cocaine Blues” by Allen Ginsberg. All this was written and performed by Circuit Ben and produced by Lee Gregory – www.myspace.com/randomleeaudio

575 SymKat» SymKat | SSH: Tips And Tricks You Need
The most-used SSH client remains OpenSSH's ssh. Read on to find Tips and Tricks to make your experience even better!

529 SynthesisWorkshops
synth modular Sound synthesis and sound design Music has brought pleasure and entertainment to mankind throughout the whole of history. Each person is by nature equipped with one of the most elaborate and emotional musical instruments; the human voice. Whenever people feel good music seems to fit the occasion, and it is considered quite natural to hum or sing a song. Musical instruments have brought their own moods to music and at the current moment in human evolution there is an enormous variety of musical instruments available. The twentieth century has seen the development of a range of new and exciting electronic musical instruments. These electronic instruments are very flexible, they can produce a wide range of timbres and can be amplified to whatever loudness level sounds best for the occasion. Most of these electronic instruments are played by a keyboard, but in essence the keyboard can be replaced by any electromechanical device that is able to transform a movement caused by a human interaction into an electrical signal that can drive the sound generating core of the electronic instrument. All sorts of technical and scientific developments have helped to create electronic instruments and the human interface to play them. Still, music is an art and not really a hard science, although music and sound have for a long time been subject to various scientific research. An important realization is that science can not really explain why much music is such a pleasure to listen to and such a joy to make. Which is not a bad thing, as probably no one is waiting for science to take the fun out of music by applying formalized rules and templates on what is also subject to ‘feel’. So, although this book covers techniques that lean heavily on scientific research, the application of these techniques will in general be aimed at creating fun. There are a lot of professionals working with sound and even more people that make music for their personal enjoyment. Mastery of sound synthesis is valuable to all of them. Still, it won’t be easy to please everyone with one single book, as some people will be more interested in how things work and others might want practical examples that just work. The aim of this book is that it can at least be used as a practical guide in workshops and courses in electronic music, covering some essential basics that are needed to operate the equipment used in sound synthesis in a way that makes some sense. Additionally it can be used to explore techniques to find out how they can help in the development of one’s own musical style. Sound synthesis is the art of creating sounds by using suitable electronic means, using either analog or digital electronic devices. Sound design is the art of creating particular sounds using sound synthesis techniques. The definition of sound design as used here might be confusing to some, as the name sound design is also used in the discipline in industrial design that occupies itself with how mass produced objects should sound. Examples are how the sound of cars or ladyshaves are ‘designed’ to sound pleasing while in use. Which of course has nothing to do at all with music or sound synthesizers. This book puts the emphasis on the various synthesis techniques for musical purposes and how to setup sound synthesizers to create a large range of characteristic musical sounds. The art of musical sound design is left to the artist.

523 Yamaha CS-01 Resonance Mod
Just to get this up here. I hope to make this clearer soon... This shows how you can modify the Yamaha CS-01 Mk1 to: 1) have variable resonance control, by hijacking the Breath Control VCF potentiometer a) remove the 10k resistor near the VCF chip. b) cut the traces (or lift the pins) of the Breath Control VCF pot that connect it to GND and the Breath Control jack. I lifted the pins just to avoid cutting PCB traces c) remove the 39k resistor tied to the wiper of the VCF pot. d) solder wires from one side of the pot and the pot wiper and run these wires over to the holes that used to contain the 10k resistor near the VCF chip e) I'd suggest adjusting the resonance trimmer that's near the VCF chip to make your new Resonance control self-oscillate near the end of the rotation. why? because this filter gets out of control in a very loud and dramatic way. I don't think this VCF chip was designed for stable self-oscillation - that may explain why, in the CS-01 Mk2, when they gave you analog control of the resonance, they used a different 24dB VCF chip. 2) have variable VCA "drone" by hijacking the Breath Control VCA potentiometer. a) remove the 1k resistor that grounds usually-closed terminal of the breath control jack to GND b) solder a 47k resistor from the ungrounded, non-wiper terminal of the pot to -9V. c) when the VCA drone pot is now fully on, you'll always get a DCO-VCF signal running to the power amp. this mod keeps the VCA only partially open, and you can still superimpose the EG over the drone. I did this because I don't have a spec sheet on the VCA chip and I didn't want to risk having the EG slamming the VCA while the drone was going full on (basically, I don't know the max CV that the VCA chip can tolerate). so if you just use the drone, you'll have to increase the volume at the power amp. But now the front-panel VCA slider actually becomes useful, since if you don't want the EG to affect the drone, just turn that down to nothing! Sorry I don't have actual pics of the mod up! Perhaps someday soon...

507 Designing A Facebook Fan Page: Showcases, Tutorials, Resources - Smashing Magazine
Despite its privacy issues, Facebook clearly has a key role in global Internet activity. It has become a kind of universal social network, being used for both web design, magazine, html, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)

443 Best Web Design Tools For Creating a Complete Website
Web Design Tools are always handy to a web designer and coder, with tons of features, fantastic UI, these tools provide best results if used wisely. Every tool free web design tools and resources , premium web designer tools , web development tools,photoshop,resources,best of,design,development

440 A List Apart: Articles: Taking Advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 with Modernizr
Ten years ago, only the most cutting-edge web designers used CSS for layouts and styling. Browser support for CSS layouts was slim and buggy, so these people advocated for web standards adherence, while creating hacks that made CSS layouts work in all browsers. One hack that became widely used was browser sniffing: Detecting which browser and version the user had by looking at the navigator.userAgent property in JavaScript. Browser sniffing allowed for quick and easy code forking, allowing developers to target different browsers with different instructions. Today, CSS-based layouts are commonplace and every browser has pretty solid support for them. But now we have CSS3 and HTML5, and the situation is repeating itself—different browsers demonstrate varying levels of support for these new technologies. We’ve smartened up, however, and no longer employ CSS hacks nor use browser sniffing—an unreliable, poor practice. We’ve also convinced more and more clients that websites don’t need to look exactly the same in every browser. So how do we deal with this new but familiar problem? Simple: We use feature detection, which means that we do not ask the browser “who are you?” and make unreliable assumptions from there on. Instead we ask the browser, “can you do this and that?” It’s a simple way to test browser capabilities, but doing all these tests manually all the time gets tiresome. To solve that problem (and others), you can use Modernizr.

405 AudioLemon: HOWTO: Build A Steampunk Oscilloscope
AudioLemon is a blog that looks at all things audio related. Synths, samplers, software, effects and a little bit of electronic music and culture. A steampunk oscilloscope built by Andrew Smith from parts found in a junk box. "Although not intended to be fully functional it does actually work." It's looks so cute... if you have the DIY skills you can read an article over on electronicsweekly detailing the build, components used and a schematic. "I discovered that I had a really cute little 7cm CRT in the loft, together with several other valves of different types, and it seemed a good idea to make something decorative with them. For me, a lot of the charm of this piece resides in the unconventional layout and design, using a polished wooden box instead of the more usual metal chassis."

376 Foobar2000:Title Formatting Reference - Hydrogenaudio Knowledgebase
This article contains information about built-in titleformatting functions and field references with special meaning. References to documentation about fields and function which can only be used in specific components or which are provided by specific components can be found at the end of this article. A field reference is a field name enclosed in percent signs, for example %artist%. A function call starts with a dollar sign, followed by the function name and the parameter list. A parameter list can either be empty - denoted as () - or contain one or more parameters separated by commata, for example $abbr(%artist%). Note that there must be no whitespace between the dollar sign and the function name, or the function name and the opening parenthesis of the parameter list. Please see Title Formatting Introduction for a presentation of titleformat syntax in general. For details of the query syntax, which uses these fields, see: Query Syntax.

368 Creating 10 Most-Used Javascript Techniques Using Pure CSS Styling | DevSnippets
Whatever content we have, we can present them in an interactive & more responsive ways with CSS styling only. In this article we’d like to present 10 Impressive techniques using pure CSS styling to create simple and interactive website without using Javascript at all.

356 The Land List -- SX-70 Cameras
Folding SX-70 Cameras: ALL Folding SX-70 Cameras have the following features in common: 4-element 116mm f/8 glass lens Minimum focus: 10.4 inches Front-cell focusing via geared wheel at top of lens/shutter housing Electronic shutter Programmed automatic exposure-- shutter speeds from >10 sec to 1/175; aperture range f/8- f/22; smaller apertures possible when flash is used. Auto flash exposure based on focus distance; Max flash distance 20ft. Has built-in Flashbar socket for flash. Accessory electronic flashes were also available. Socket for an electrically-actuated remote shutter release.

347 Pixelh8 - Multidisciplinary Artist and Techno Anthropologist » Software
The Pixelh8 Music Tech Master Stroke DS is a real time synthesizer for the Nintendo DS system it allows for extensive sound design and is the natural evolution of the Music Tech Series allowing for the classic chip tune sound on a modern device. The new system allows for keyboard style play by pressing “X” to bring up the 2 Ocatve Xylophone or classic Music Tech mode by using the directional pad to control the sounds in the same way as the Music Tech Game Boy and Pro Performer Game Boy Advance. Loads of new combinations are possible as you can now combine interval settings with time based effects as well as using the noise channel instead of tone and the easy change between menus allow for quick change during performance. All sounds are produced via the on board sound chip and no samples or sample manipulation is used, this is a real time chip tune synth for the DS.

312 12 Applications to Make Your Facebook Page More Engaging
Currently, there are more than three million active Facebook Pages on the top ranked site, with the typical Page boasting an average of less than 1,000 fans – oops, I mean ‘likes‘ (seriously, that just doesn’t roll off your tongue quite the same way). Standing out from the static requires you to dress up your Page and make it more interesting and fun for your ‘likers’. That’s where Facebook applications come in. They’re basically like plugins for your Page and there are tens of thousands of them available. Deciding what apps you’d like to incorporate depends on how you’d like to engage with your peeps (that’s an even better word than ‘likers’). Here’s a compilation of some must have applications for any Page. They’re great additions to the the basic layout that Facebook provides and they can be used in interesting ways to move your ‘likes‘ into action.

301 Yamaha CS-15 mods: info and modification description (contribution by Don Solaris)
The original CS-15 is a great monophonic synth from the late 70's. It has a specific dual 12 dB multimode filter structure and a dual signal path. However these two filters are permanently set into parallel connection. This can be sometimes limiting, specially when more filter power is required (i.e. 24 dB response). One of the mods here will provide your CS-15 with serial filter connection - the 24dB mode. Of course, switch is included so that you can always bring back the original unmodified parallel filter routing the 12dB + 12 dB mode. One of the features that make CS-15 specific (next to parallel filters) is the ultra fast LFO that will go all the way up to 100 Hz. There are no many analog synths with LFOs that can go that fast (most end at 10-15 Hz). The potentiometer is used to tune from 0.1 Hz to 100 Hz. If you look at the numbers, this is quite a big range, and we said majority of LFO modulations are performed in up to 10 Hz range. The same is applied on CS-15's LFO potentiometer. That means, you can precisely tune from 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz (over 80% of potentiometer's turn ). However, going from 30 Hz to 100 Hz occupies only 10% of the potentiometer's turn. So if you were to perform some kind FM or Ring Mod effects, this might become a tricky job, as it requires precise tuning, but instead potentiometer jumps from i.e. 20 Hz into 40, then 70 then 100 Hz. Please note, this doesn't have anything to do with potentiometer's condition (cleaning). No matter how good you clean it, the same problem will exist, simply because this is the physical precision limit of the potentiometer. The only solution is to expand the precision in the high frequency range. In other words, we will expand 10% of potentiometer's turn into some 80% or more. Switch is included to provide the original unmodified version.

259 9 Useful PHP Functions and Features You Need to Know | Nettuts+
Even after using PHP for years, we stumble upon functions and features that we did not know about. Some of these can be very useful, yet underused. Not all of

258 SEOmoz | 30 SEO Problems & the Tools to Solve Them (Part 2 of 2)
Last November, I authored a popular post on SEOmoz detailing 15 SEO Problems and the Tools to Solve Them. It focused on a number of free tools and SEOmoz PRO tools. Today, I'm finishing up that project with a stab at another set of thorny issues that continually confound SEOs and how some new ...

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "

213 All Design Patterns | Open Source Design Pattern Library
Fluid is an open-source software community Fluid builds user interfaces, designs commonly used interactions, teaches others how to build good user-centred designs, and works with other software projects to integrate our solutions into their applications.

206 Free Printable Sketching, Wireframing and Note-Taking PDF Templates - Smashing Magazine
Sketching and wireframing are a specialized style of drawing, used for fleshing out preliminary complex ideas, group brain-storming, a lo-fi method for evaluating... design, magazine, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons, css, fonts

199 20 Portable Applications Web Designers Should Have On Their USB Sticks | Design Reviver
Portable applications have been known to be used by the professional on-the-go for quite some time now. These amazingly lightweight applications allow us to portable,usb,usb drive,web designer

189 Select Manufacturer /// PrePal
List of manufacturers currently tracked, with links to their product prices. prepal,used,preowned,worth,value,price,price guide,for sale,music,musical,musician,instrument,gear,music gear,musical equipment,guitar,bass,rack mount,keyboard,synth,synthesizer,sampler,drum,amp,effects,manufacturers

165 SQL Server Join Examples
I am new to SQL Server and want to learn about the JOIN options. What are all of the JOIN options in SQL Server? What is the significance of each of the options? I am a little confused on the differences and syntax, can you provide some examples and ex

128 HybridReverb
HybridReverb2 is a convolution-based reverberation effect which combines the superior sound quality of a convolution reverb with the tuning capability of a feedback delay network. The sound quality of a convolution reverb depends on the quality of the used room impulse responses. HybridReverb2 comes with a set of room impulse responses which were synthesized with tinyAVE, an auralization software which was developed at the Institute of Communication Acoustics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Borß and Martin, 2009; Borß, 2009a). These room impulse responses are designed for a speaker setup with two front and two rear speakers (Borß, 2009b). For a full surround sound effect, you will need two plugins, one plugin which uses a "front" preset for the front channels and a second plugin which uses the corresponding "rear" preset for the rear channels.

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