100SILEX, de 0 100 s: background
1086 Ninite - Install or Update Multiple Apps at Once
The easiest, fastest way to update or install software. Ninite downloads and installs programs automatically in the background.
http://ninite.com/

871 Get familiar with HTML5! - Dev.Opera
Dev.Opera article: Get familiar with HTML5! developer,article,html, wsc,html5,web standards curriculum,open web Introduction Most of the web standards curriculum is based on the last stable version of HTML — HTML 4.01. The HTML 4.01 spec was completed in 1999, over 10 years ago as of the time of this writing! But unless you've been hiding under a rock for the last year or so, you'll be well aware that there is a new version of HTML in production — HTML5! So why have we been teaching you HTML 4.01 in spite of this? In this article we'll answer this question, and many more. We'll give you the essential background you need to know on why HTML5 came about, and where it is up to now. We'll advise you on how it can fit into your learning right now, even if you are a novice web designer or developer, and we will look at some of the main features of HTML5, so you can see what it adds to the already powerful HTML language.
http://dev.opera.com/articles/view/get-familiar-with-html5/

748 30 Examples of Big Backgrounds in Web Design | Inspiration
This week we decided to gather a selection of Big Backgrounds in web design and to be honest I thought that I will find way more great examples that I actually found. I mean, as you will see here, that are plenty of nice examples of websites that use photography as their backgrounds, their 'big images backgrounds'. inspiration,web design
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/30-examples-of-big-backgrounds-in-web-design/

674 Remove Complex Backgrounds from Images in Photoshop - How-To Geek
While tools like the Magic Eraser can sometimes remove your backgrounds, the fact is you're going to have to get your hands dirty with the eraser if you have images with complex backgrounds that need removing. Windows, Windows Vista, Ubuntu, Programming, Networking, Firefox, Help, Solaris, Linux, Unix, VMware ,SQL Server, Oracle, MySQL, Analytics, Suse, Redhat, network security, firewall, postgresql,database, how to, how-to, howto, hints, tips, shell scripts, system administration
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/29811/remove-complex-backgrounds-from-images-in-photoshop/

616 Alphabet Soup modular synth
The STS Serge Modular can be a daunting system at first blush, especially for those who come from an "East Coast" modular synth background. My first synthesizers were Moog analogs and my first Analog Modular Synth was an Arrick "Dotcom" system - so I started out with East Coast paradigms that I had to "unlearn" in order to use my Serge Modular to the fullest. For those of you coming from a similar background or those just discovering the Serge Modular for the first time, these "Alphabet Soup" pages are dedicated to you! The Serge Modular is intuitive and fun to use - especially when you realize the main difference between a Serge Modular and most others has to do with the size of the building blocks, where a Moog or similar modular will have monolithic building blocks like ADSRs and Oscillators, the Serge can be more "low-level" in that you can build ADSRs and oscillators from Serge modules or, more properly, Function Blocks. These Function Blocks usually come bearing arcane names that have been shortened to an "Alphabet Soup" conglomeration of acronyms. In this series of articles, I'll be talking about some of the ways to approach these Function Blocks to create much more useful, surprising, complex or just simply fun synthesis features. The first function block we're going to look at is the "DSG", otherwise known as the Dual Universal Slope Generator. This mild-mannered module is in some ways the most powerful one in the entire Serge catalog because it can become so many different things depending on where you place the patch cords...as you'll soon see.
http://www.carbon111.com/alphabet1.html

608 Stories In Flight | HTML5/CSS3 Cheatsheet
Here are some simple cut-and-paste examples of HTML5/CSS3 features that are currently (mid-2010) usable across a number of web browsers, chief among them Firefox, Safari, Chrome and Opera. For many of the CSS3 examples, Internet Explorer is the lone holdout with a limited number of workarounds, however these features degrade gracefully and may still be useful on new projects as long as this limitation is kept in mind. Both for SVG and Canvas there exist solid workarounds in the form of JavaScript libraries that allow even Internet Explorer to display these new objects, and in the case of SVGweb it may be a good idea to use this workaround for all browsers to limit the variability of the SVG rendering across platforms. Please note: With the exception of SVGWeb, no Internet Explorer workarounds have been included on this page - most of the examples will therefore not work in IE6, IE7 or IE8. And if you want to discuss any of the code below or leave a correction or suggestion, you can leave comments below and here is also The Web We Should Have on my blog. Thanks! On this page: HTML5 DOCTYPE Rounded Corners Rounded Corners Redux: Circles Box Shadows Text Shadows Border Images Transform Rotate Column Layout SVG Canvas Canvas Text Canvas Text Rotate Some more complex subjects are also discussed in these separate pages: CSS3 Transforms Ruby Annotations Multiple Background Images HTML5 Audio and JavaScript Control HTML5 Audio Data API - Spectrum Visualizer JavaScript: Binary Loader Google Font API and Font Loading Behavior JavaScript: Sorting DIVs JavaScript: HTML5 Video with SRT Subtitles ...and don't forget to leave some comments below!
http://www.storiesinflight.com/html5/

602 Free Music Friday – Circuit Ben « GetLoFi – Circuit Bending Synth DIY
Circuit Ben is Killing Music Album now is free to download. Enjoy great catchy tunes and top notch production. This is a very good example melodic composition with circuit bent toys. Circuit_Ben_is_Killing_Music Download Background Info: Bent Stuff used: Casio sk1, Casio sk5, Casio sk100, Casio pt-20, Casio ks-03, Yamaha pss-11, Yamaha pss460, Hing Hon EK-001, Cheburashka!, Jim Bowen/Al Pacino dub siren, Super ultra mega, Fun-box (orgasm toy), Toy Koran (Quran), Cheap Chinese phone toys, Kung Fu toy, Captain Scarlet’s car, “Pound Shop” keyboard (cost £1 new.), Dragonball Z keyrings, Barbie keyboard, Fisher-price tape recorder (now dirty,dirty guitar amp.), George W Bush and probably about fifty circuits with a soldered output that were bent/killed while recording – auto-destruct! Non Bent Stuff: Mini Kaoss pad, Gameboy with Nanoloop, Melodica, 5-litre oil can guitar, Acoustic bass, Casio kx-101, Stylophone, Voice Ben Says that in general songs are as vague as possible and about nothing – that’s the story he is sticking to The Lyrics for “Allen” are from “Cocaine Blues” by Allen Ginsberg. All this was written and performed by Circuit Ben and produced by Lee Gregory – www.myspace.com/randomleeaudio
http://www.getlofi.com/?p=1687

509 A List Apart: Articles: Supersize that Background, Please!
With an advertising world keen to use every inch of a medium for brand or product experience, it is becoming increasingly popular to design websites with full-browser backgrounds. Using CSS, this can be achieved quite easily. Just drop a huge background image in a page with one line of code (Line wraps marked » —Ed.): body { background: #000 url(myBackground_1280x960.jpg) » center center fixed no-repeat; }
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/supersize-that-background-please/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

468 The Complete Web Design Style Series (700 Designs in 14 Categories) - Speckyboy Design Magazine
Over the past year or so we have periodically published web design collections and inspirational showcases from the most popular and important design 2009,2010,404,agency,app,application,apps,art,best,black,blog,clean,collection,color,company,corporate,design,design style,designer,developer,ecommerce,effect,form,free,freelance,graphic design,gui,headline,illustration,inspiration,large background,layout,logo,magazine,minimal,nav,navigation,photo,photography,proposal,retro,showcase,text,typography,vector,vintage,web app,web design,web designer,wp,css,design style series,illustrator,web apps
http://speckyboy.com/2010/06/27/the-complete-web-design-style-series-700-designs-in-14-categories/

375 30 Minimalist Web Designs for Your Inspiration - Web Design Blog – DesignM.ag
Designers love to see variety in styles from one website to the next. Although large images, extravagant backgrounds, video, and other elements have become much more common as the average user's connection speed has increased, many designers are still doing an excellent job of keeping things simple. In this post we'll feature 30 websites that use a minimalist style of design. Skylar Anderson
http://designm.ag/inspiration/30-minimalist-web-designs-for-your-inspiration/

335 Create Seamless Web Background Textures in Minutes | Design Shack
photoshop
http://designshack.co.uk/articles/css/create-seamless-web-background-textures-in-minutes/

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