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1517 THE MUTANT MACHINE Dynamic Analog Percussion Engine
MICROCONTROLLER FREE ANALOG PERCUSSION SYNTHESIS unique Inverter Core oscillators form the MEMBRANE. Each analog oscillator has three waveforms to select from capable of synthesizing everything from heavy-hitting bassdrums to classic 909-style snares and other complex timbres modular design gives the Machine many auxiliary purposes, great for modular sound design of many varieties, and not just percussion the SNAPPY section is comprised of a voltage controlled noise oscillator, for modelling the noisy part of drum timbres both MEMBRANE and SNAPPY elements have an external input for replacing the built-in sound sources, opening up many avenues of possibility 13 control voltage and audio inputs, for a fully modular drum experience 7 audio and CV/gate outputs for maximum integration with other modules dedicated outputs for each WAVE and NOISE oscillator mean you can use the Machine as a complex VCO in your system, when not synthesizing percussion WAVEFORM SCANNING FEATURE GENERATES COMPLEX TIMBRES the MEMBRANE’s waveforms can be scanned through automatically by the wavescanner’s voltage controlled clock generator, or an external clock or VCO can be used SCAN FREQ CV forms a unique form of timbre control, making the Machine act like a complex oscillator at its WAVES output the ENABLE input allows you to gate the wavescanner on and off with a CV or gate signal ARCHITECTURE OF THE MACHINE The Mutant Machine is a dynamic analog instrument capable of generating a wide palette of sounds, ranging from various forms of analog percussion to complex drones and oscillations. To achieve this, the Machine features two synthesis sections which are summed together at the final output: MEMBRANE and SNAPPY. Like the other Mutant Drums, the MEMBRANE and SNAPPY circuits began their mutation as classic analog percussion techniques and have been reimagined for 21st century modular synthesis. The MEMBRANE forms the main body of the sound by way of two analog VCOs, and the SNAPPY section further adds to the timbre by contributing noisy elements to the mix. A noisy CLICK which occurs at the beginning of the SNAPPY sound can have its volume adjusted independent of the main decaying SNAPPY texture. The waveforms which make up the MEMBRANE can be selected manually by button press, or the WAVESCANNER can be used to automatically scan through the available analog waveforms. By modulating the frequency through which waves are scanned, unique, complex sounds are created. Experimentation is encouraged by the many modulation inputs and outputs available to you. The Machine features 8 CV and gate inputs for modulation as well as two external audio inputs, for bringing other modules into the Machine’s core. There are many audio outputs for maximum versatility, allowing you to use the Machine to create drones and alien timbres for use elsewhere in the modular analog system.
http://www.hexinverter.net/mutant-machine

1502 Phone-Reluctant Introverts, There is Nothing Wrong With You
As I sit down to write this blog post there is the dreaded sound of a prolonged vibration as my phone skids, bouncing and sporadically across my desk. This is perfectly ideal and ironic distraction that actually befits the very thing I am thinking about and from which it is distracting me… Itself! I have always had an absolute detest for talking on the phone. And I’ll say now that it has nothing whatsoever to do with the person at the other end, I just find it a horrible tool for communicating with. Phone Box I think I probably am, and always have been worse than most people when it comes to using the phone (in the traditional sense, ie speaking to people) but if you can identify with any of this then read on. If you’re thinking, “what are you on about, I love the phone” then you’ll probably just get confused, but if you also have friends who ‘never answer the phone’ then this might help you to understand them a bit better. I can’t sum it up any better than Sophia Dembling in her article, 9 Signs that You Might Be an Introvert:
http://www.sheepdressedlikewolves.com/phone-reluctant-introvert/

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1381 COLLIN CUNNINGHAM / NARBOTIC INSTRUMENTS
COLLIN CUNNINGHAM / NARBOTIC INSTRUMENTS [BLOG] MidiVox CV sketch update 02.05.2012 The MidiVox CV sketch has been updated to work with Arduino 1.0 - grab it here Also be sure to use the new version of the Midi Library as well! Also, also: Some previous comments on earlier posts seem to have been lost in a recent Disqus migration - apologies to previous commenters. 7 Comments Updated Midi Library & site changes 01.23.2012 Perhaps you noticed narbotic.com looks different? It is different! A big thanks to everyone who picked up a MidiVox kit - you are now the proud owner of a rare piece of electronics. Though the kit is no longer in production, there is now a new version of the Midi Libray which has been updated to work with the Arduino 1.0 IDE. In addition to an aesthetic reboot, this site will now serve as your premiere destination for all things Collin Cunningham on the web. (and I vow that will be the one & only time I refer to myself in the third-person) New things are in the works - more to come 2 Comments
http://narbotic.com/?p=130

1267 Minimal Wave
Veronica Vasicka has been hosting her EVR show since 2003. She explores a range of electronic music from the 70s till now featuring gems she discovers for her Minimal Wave record label.
http://www.eastvillageradio.com/shows/nowplaying.aspx?contentid=1280&showid=248820

1256 Sony | Vintage Electronics Have Soul – The Pocket Calculator Show Website
We owe much gratitude to Sony, for they were responsible for making the personal stereo cassette player a reality. For over 25 years, Sony has been bringing a personal, portable stereo music experience to our ears–creativity and innovation have continued to make Walkman a useful product to everyone. Walkman has reached pop icon status and become a symbol of youth, individuality and freedom. In 1979 Sony warned, “Remember the name: Walkman.” How could we forget?
http://pocketcalculatorshow.com/walkman/sony/

1215 Panasonic Toughbook CF-T8 review | Laptops and netbooks Reviews | TechRadar
Panasonic Toughbook CF-T8 review - Panasonic have yet to release an Eee-style netbook PC; and with good reason - their Toughbook range of laptops has been hugely successful, and new, interesting additions to their line of ruggedised PCs are coming thick and fast. Buying advice from the leading technology site
http://www.techradar.com/reviews/pc-mac/laptops-portable-pcs/laptops-and-netbooks/panasonic-toughbook-cf-t8-481969/review

1161 body rock tv fitness
I have a non-fitness related life situation that I wanted to run by you guys…. I wanted to talk to you guys today about not always having to say your sorry. Are you one of those people who finds yourself apologizing for things just to smooth things over or avoid a confrontation? This ability is admirable in certain low-key non-crucial situations. It’s when we apologize for our beliefs and principles – or in the face of being bullied that we pay the high price of compromising ourselves. I have a friend who is being treated badly by certain members of her family. It really comes down to her not living her life exactly the way they think she should be living it. My friend is not endangering herself or others, she is kind hearted and generous to the extreme, but because she is not pulling the line and placing the needs of others before her own basic needs and happiness she is taking a lot of undeserved heat bordering on emotional abuse. Her strategy to this point has been to apologize left and right in an attempt to smooth it over and reset everything. It hasn’t worked and if anything it has given the people giving her a hard time more of a license to push it even further. I think there comes a time when you just have to say enough and stop apologizing. I think that there is more strength and balance in believing in yourself and respectfully staying firm in your truth. From this position I think both sides have the best chance of talking it through and resolving it. What do you guys think? Do you find yourself constantly apologizing to certain people in your life? Is it helping or making the relationship more challenging? Any advice for my friend?
http://www.bodyrock.tv/

1128 Venetian Snares on bandcamp
Venetian Snares My name is Aaron. Affectionate, released 11 January 2012 1. Seqsy 2. Lesbians2 3. Chordate 4. Lesbians1 It's my birthday. Here are four nice trax from my collection. Been listening to these often, I like the way they make me feel.
http://venetiansnares.bandcamp.com/

1126 Tim Stinchcombe - Home Page
Doepfer A-100 Synthesizer The Doepfer A-100 system conforms to the smaller of the two most popular sizes, modules being 3U high and using 3.5mm jacks, as opposed to the larger 'Moog-style' modules using the large 1/4-inch jacks. This is not to everyone's taste, but there is no denying that they offer a very wide range of modules, currently at over 100, and they are competitively priced. My system has been steadily growing (go here for my current list) since I bought the original batch in 2001
http://www.timstinchcombe.co.uk/index.php?pge=home

1109 Weekend with the Ricoh GRDIV |
I’ve fielded a lot of questions lately about Ricoh’s latest camera, the GRDIV. Honestly, it was getting a little tedious hearing about it haha. Although I suppose I understand considering there’s hardly anything written about it anywhere. I’ve been having a bit of a love affair with Ricoh’s film cameras the last little while so I hadn’t thought much about the GRDIV. After having a chance to get one though, I decided it a good idea to give it a go.
http://jtinseoul.wordpress.com/2011/11/06/weekend-with-the-ricoh-grdiv/

1048 COIL
COIL Any future official Coil news and releases will be made here. Jordi Devas (the executor of Peter's estate) and myself intend to make the entire Coil back catalogue available again on CD and any previously unreleased or unfinished work will be released as such. All in good time. There have been NO official Coil releases since Peter passed away and I can confirm that a recent unofficial release has absolutely nothing to do with Coil . Please don't feed these parasites to genuine creativity.
http://www.arktodd.com/page10.htm

1015 Aliens Project » SynxsS Studio News #082
Endlich sind die Umbaumaßnahmen soweit beendet, der ganze Müll und Dreck ist raus und ich kann wieder ganz normal hier arbeiten. Kein Staub mehr -jaaaa. Alle Synthies, die ich vorrübergehend weggepackt hatte, sind wieder soweit einsatzbereit. Okay, hier und da fehlt noch ein Kabel, aber das ist ja schnell eingesteckt. Das neue Regal für die Kleinsynthies macht sich prima, so hab ich künftig alle Geräte sofort greifbar. Praktisch, wenn ich meine Livesachen in die Koffer packe. Das grüne Licht hat verschiedene Farben und reicht von bläulichem bis zu gelblichen Grüntönen. Irgendwie kann ich das mit meiner Einfachknipse auf den Bilden garnicht richtig einfangen, schaut aber in natura schon sehr spacig aus. Der ganze Dekokram hängt auch, hatte noch ein paar alte Munitionskisten hier rumliegen, die habe ich auch gleich mit verbaut. “Eigentlich” wollte ich ja “nur” ein paar Alubleche an die Wand schrauben… Im oberen Bereich hatte ich ja schon umgebaut, da hat sich seit Februar eigentlich nichts mehr verändert. Nun denn, viel Spaß mit den Bildern. Wenn ihr “Synxxs Studio News” in die Suchmaske eingebt, findet ihr noch ganz viele Bilder mehr.
http://aliens-project.de/blog/?p=13863

1010 PowerFX Vocaloid 2 Sweet Ann
Yamaha’s Vocaloid technology has now been upgraded to version 2 and Sweet Ann, from PowerFX, is the first virtual singer based on the new release. So just how much further forward have Yamaha moved their intriguing vocal synthesis technology? software, review, PowerFX, Vocaloid 2, Sweet Ann, Singing Synthesis, PC, John Walden, Yamaha, Vocaloid, technology, virtual singer, vocal synthesis, real-time, VST Instrument
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan08/articles/sweetann.htm

944 BBC News - Structure of stars revealed by 'music' they emit
The sounds emitted by stars light years away from Earth have been captured by British astronomers using Nasa's Kepler space telescope.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13009718

872 Boomkat - Your independent music specialist
Boomkat - A specialist music website selling VINYLs, CDs, DVDs and DIGITAL DOWNLOADS, brought to you by a dedicated team who have been operating in this field for 10 years - building up a huge resource of information and opinion about music that exists beyond the radar... Our product extends to cover the most underground forms of Electronic music, Hip Hop, Post-Folk, Alt.Country, IDM, Electro, Acoustica, Post-Rock, Ambient, Micro House, Detroit Techno, Mentalism, Electropop, Indiepop, Grime, Free Jazz, Modern Composition, Cologne Techno, Future Disco, Drone, Sublow, Soundtracks, Noise and out and out post-generic objects of wonder. Electronic Music, Electronica, IDM, Warp, Autechre, Aphex Twin, Boards Of Canada, Arovane, Bola, Experimental, Dance, Dance Music, Records, Vinyl, Skam, CCO, Morr Music, Kid 606, Isan, City Centre Offices, Pole, Matmos, Anticon, Mush, Schematic, Drexciya, Hip Hop, Mille Plateaux, VVM, Ryoji Ikeda, Fennesz, Mego, Raster Noton, Rephlex, Squarepusher, Skanfrom, Marumari, Force Inc, Stereolab, Herbert, Geiom, Neo Ouija, Tzadik, Team Doyobi, Black Dog, Ulrich Schnauss, Opiate, Bjork, Thrill Jockey, Scape, Gonzales, Benge, Toytronic, Gimmik, Abfahrt Hinwil, Kompakt, Berlin, Tigerbeat 6, Cex, Twerk, Neuton, Maurizio, Tikiman, Prefuse 73, Akufen, Cologne, A-Musik, Boomkat, Boomcat
http://boomkat.com/

871 Get familiar with HTML5! - Dev.Opera
Dev.Opera article: Get familiar with HTML5! developer,article,html, wsc,html5,web standards curriculum,open web Introduction Most of the web standards curriculum is based on the last stable version of HTML — HTML 4.01. The HTML 4.01 spec was completed in 1999, over 10 years ago as of the time of this writing! But unless you've been hiding under a rock for the last year or so, you'll be well aware that there is a new version of HTML in production — HTML5! So why have we been teaching you HTML 4.01 in spite of this? In this article we'll answer this question, and many more. We'll give you the essential background you need to know on why HTML5 came about, and where it is up to now. We'll advise you on how it can fit into your learning right now, even if you are a novice web designer or developer, and we will look at some of the main features of HTML5, so you can see what it adds to the already powerful HTML language.
http://dev.opera.com/articles/view/get-familiar-with-html5/

870 How I Use Visualization To Drive Creativity
This is a guest post by Mark Suster, a 2x entrepreneur turned VC.  He sold his second company to Salesforce.com, becoming VP of Product Management. He joined GRP Partners in 2007 as a General Partner focusing on early-stage technology companies. Read more about Suster on his blog at Bothsidesofthetable and on Twitter at @msuster. This is a guest post by Mark Suster, a 2x entrepreneur turned VC. He sold his second company to Salesforce.com, becoming VP of Product Management. He joined GRP Partners in 2007 as a General Partner focusing on early-stage technology companies. Read more about Suster on his blog at Bothsidesofthetable and on Twitter at @msuster. Creativity. I’ve always believed it’s been one of the most important attributes of business success yet something very few business leaders talk about. So I thought I’d write a post about how I drive my personal creativity. As a practitioner of creativity rather than as an instructor of it I’m certain that there are many ways to get the creative juices flowing and how to release more creativity. The one that works best for me is visualization coupled with self talk. Visualization is so important to help yourself & others conceptualize ideas. It’s why I always work hard to find images for my blog posts & why all of my keynote presentations are visual rather than bullet points with words.
http://techcrunch.com/2011/01/17/how-i-use-visualization-to-drive-creativity/

868 How Facebook Ships Code « FrameThink – Frameworks for Thinking People
I’m fascinated by the way Facebook operates. It’s a very unique environment, not easily replicated (nor would their system work for all companies, even if they tried). These are notes gathered from talking with many friends at Facebook about how the company develops and releases software. It’s been over six months since I assembled these observations and I’m sure Facebook has continuously evolved its software development practices in the meantime. So these notes are probably a little bit out-of-date. It also seems like Facebook’s developer-driven culture is coming under greater public scrutiny. So I’m feeling more comfortable now about releasing these notes… HUGE thanks to the many folks who helped put together this view inside of Facebook! Thanks are also due to folks like epriest and fryfrog who have written up corrections and edits.
http://framethink.wordpress.com/2011/01/17/how-facebook-ships-code/

812 ED102 - Octave-Volts-Hertz
The ED102 borrows heavily from the Korg MS-02™ although it was developed independently of Korg Inc. Korg and MS-02 are the trademarks of Korg Inc. Among presently available music synthesizers, there are two different types of control system used for controlling devices such as the VCO (voltage controlled oscillator) and VCF (voltage controlled filter). These two systems been: Hertz/Volt (Hz/V) and Octave/Volt (Oct/V). The graph to the left shows the relationship between the VCO oscillator frequency (pitch) and the control voltage (keyboard output voltage). The straight line on the graph is from a synthesizer in which there is a one octave change for every one volt change in the control voltage (Oct/V). In contrast, the curved line on the graph is the control voltage from a synthesizer in which the VCO frequency is proportional to voltage (Hz/V system). To allow these systems to work together you will need a module like this ED102. The built-in, fully adjustable log amp and anti-log amp ensure complete system flexibility and compatibility between any presently voltage controlled synthesiser. The Hz/V system In the Hz/V system, the VCO oscillator frequency is proportional to the control voltage so that, for example, if the frequency of a VCO increases by 100Hz for every volt applied, then applying 1V, 2V and 3V to this VCO would generate 100Hz, 200Hz and 300Hz respectively. The Oct/V system In the Oct/V system the VCO oscillator frequency changes one octave for every one volt change in the control voltage so that, for example, 1V, 2V and 3V to a VCO would generate 200Hz, 400Hz and 800Hz respectively. Features and Functions Log Amp: This changes a Hz/V type keyboard CV (control voltage) output into an OCT/V type of CV. Use the Log Amp to change the control signal from, say, a Korg or Yamaha synthesiser into a signal you can use with another type of synthesizer. Antilog Amp: This changes an OCT/V type of keyboard CV output into a Hz/V type of CV. Use this Antilog Amp when you want to control, say, a Korg synthesiser by means of a unit that uses the OCT/V system.
http://www.elby-designs.com/panther/ed102-octave-volts-hertz/ed102.htm

781 Atlas obscura
About the Atlas Obscura Welcome to the Atlas Obscura, a compendium of this age's wonders, curiosities, and esoterica. The Atlas Obscura is a collaborative project with the goal of cataloging all of the singular, eccentric, bizarre, fantastical, and strange out-of-the-way places that get left out of traditional travel guidebooks and are ignored by the average tourist. If you're looking for miniature cities, glass flowers, books bound in human skin, gigantic flaming holes in the ground, phallological museums, bone churches, balancing pagodas, or homes built entirely out of paper, the Atlas Obscura is where you'll find them. The Atlas Obscura is not just about collecting oddities. In an age where everything seems to have been explored and there is nothing new to be found, the Atlas Obscura celebrates a different way of traveling, and a different lens through which to view the world. The Atlas Obscura depends on our community of far-flung explorers to find and report back about the world's wonders and curiosities. If you have been to, know of, or have heard about a place that belongs in the Atlas Obscura, we want you to tell us about it. Anyone and everyone is welcome and encouraged to nominate places for inclusion, and to edit content already in the Atlas. Thanks for stopping by, and good exploring!
http://atlasobscura.com/globe/europe/france?page=3

756 Matmos - Supreme Balloon
The arcs of rising and falling pitches that start this song reminded us of a rainbow, and the title stuck: any resemblance to fluttering symbols of homo-nationalist pride are side effects. People have asked us about the Latin kitsch aspect of the song, and we plead guilty to a great love of the Richard Hayman "The Genuine Electric Latin Love Machine" Moog novelty LP from 1969. Having lived in the Mission District of San Francisco for seven years up until our recent move to Baltimore, we have had enough casual exposure to actual Mexican and Salvadorean music to know that this bears only the faintest relation to the real thing. Keith Fullerton Whitman contributed some tasty squelches and zaps from his Doepfer modular synth to brighten the corners, but not everything on here is that high-tech. Consider the lowly stylophone, a handheld novelty instrument popular with British schoolkids that was immortalized during the rave era in the cheesy techno banger "Stylophonia" by the fabulously named UK crew Two Little Boys. The stylophone that is played on this record was sent to us in the mail by a well-wisher and we thank him for this unexpected present. We are even more grateful to Safety Scissors, who forgave us when M. C. Schmidt broke his MS-20 filter knob by tweaking it too vigorously while recording the "horn" part of this song. It's all been patched up now.
http://www.brainwashed.com/common/htdocs/discog/ole799.php?site=matmos

752 How To: Copyright Signature Watermark On Lightroom 2 Using Mogrify Plugin
This tutorial is for those who are still using Lightroom 2. If you have Lightroom 3, please go to this tutorial I have been getting some question from my friends and reader on how to put a signature on your editing, lightroom, mogrify, plugin, Post Processing, signature
http://augusteo.com/2009/04/19/how-to-copyright-signature-watermark-on-lightroom-using-mogrify-plugin/

746 40 Essential CSS Templates, Resources and Downloads | Speckyboy Design Magazine
Every web developer should have in their toolbox a collection of CSS tools and resources like the ones outlined in this article. A set of techniques that you rely on and that are always at the ready to cover any possible eventuality. You will find not a selection of the latest innovative CSS techniques (there are some) in this article, merely a collection of tools, resources and downloads that can be used by web designers for solutions to everyday CSS design and coding solutions. The resources below have been split into four categories: CSS Download Packages (all of the CSS resources offer multiple variations of each technique), Downloadable CSS Tools (the resources within this category offers specialized templates), Web, Mobile & Form Frameworks (+ tools and templates to help you get started with each); Feature-Rich and Outstanding Mobile & Web Templates and finally, a selection of tools to help with cross browser compatibility. We don’t presume that this is an ultimate collection, merely a selection of resources we have found to be indispensable. We are positive we have missed a few, and would love to hear about the tools and resources you rely upon.
http://speckyboy.com/2010/11/08/40-essential-css-templates-resources-and-downloads/

727 How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect | Apartment Therapy DC
How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect Mclain Wiesand, a Baltimore-based custom furniture company, has made a name for itself by producing handcrafted pieces that capture the feel of real antiques. One of the techniques they use for aging mirror is wonderfully simple and serves as the inspiration for this how to. Creating an antique mirror effect is an inexpensive way to revamp a flea market find, or add a new layer of interest and depth to an ordinary wall mirror. Almost any type of mirror can be aged using this technique, including mirrored plexiglass. Supplies • Mirrored glass or plexiglass. Due to the type of paint applied to the reflective coating, inexpensive, craft-store mirror works wonderfully. • Latex or other gloves for hand protection. • Paint stripper. Most types work fine. For a less toxic product, Citristrip works well. • Plastic putty spreader or putty knife. • Modern Masters Metal Effects Black Patina. This patina solution is essentially an acid that eats at the reflective surface of the mirror. There are probably other products that work similarly, but Modern Masters products work well and can be found online or in most art supply stores or specialty paint stores. • 1” chip brush (or similar brush). • Silver paint of choice. Steps Step 1: (Image 2, above) Wearing gloves, place mirror face down on cardboard or other protected surface in a well-ventilated area. Apply stripper generously to back of mirror and allow to sit for a few hours, or until paint can be easily removed with plastic scraper. It is not necessary for all of the paint to be removed; generally speaking, 80-90% should suffice. When paint has been stripped, wash mirror with soap and water and allow to dry. Step 2: (Images 3 & 4) Place stripped mirror face down on clean cardboard or other protected surface. Dip chip brush in Modern Masters Metal Patina Solution and gradually apply it to the raw reflective surface of the mirror. As mirror tends to age from the edges inward, it is best to apply patina solution in heavier amounts around the edges of the mirror. In a matter of minutes (or less), the patina solution will begin to eat away at the reflective surface. Other application techniques that produce nice effects are spattering and light directional brushing of patina solution. Continue applying solution until desired level of ageing is achieved. Rinse with water to neutralize the reaction and allow to dry. Step 3: (photos 5 & 6) This next step involves reapplying paint to the back of the mirror. The color paint you choose will be visible through the spots created by the patina solution. The dark areas of aged antique mirrors tend to be a dark silver-grey but depending on the silvering technique used, can range from gold to pale silver to black. One method that produced nice results is a combination of dark and light silver paints, applied randomly (per images). Apply paint until the reflective surface is completely covered.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/how-to/how-to-create-an-antique-mirror-effect-127227

722 Making AJAX Applications Crawlable - Google Code
If you're running an AJAX application with content that you'd like to appear in search results, we have a new process that, when implemented, can help Google (and potentially other search engines) crawl and index your content. Historically, AJAX applications have been difficult for search engines to process because AJAX content is produced dynamically by the browser and thus not visible to crawlers. While there are existing methods for dealing with this problem, they involve regular manual maintenance to keep the content up-to-date. Learn more Learn why search engines don't see the content you see and what needs to happen to fix this. Getting started guide Get started in making your AJAX application visible to search engines. If you are in a hurry, you can start here, but AJAX crawling is a complex topic, so we recommend reading all the documentation. Creating HTML snapshots Learn more about creating HTML snapshots, and which technique might be best suited for your application. Frequently asked questions Having trouble? Check out the frequently asked questions. Specification Get the details.
http://code.google.com/intl/fr/web/ajaxcrawling/

687 50 Beautiful and Fresh Free Fonts
As you will already know, there are thousands upon thousands of free fonts available, so choosing that perfect font can be very, very difficult. Its tedious business constantly scouring through countless font directories and foundries to hopefully find what you are looking for. Hopefully, with this post, we can make your search that little bit easier by rounding up 50 of our favorite fonts that have been released in recent months. So, whether you design web pages, t-shirts, posters or just seeking some typographical inspiration, we have no doubt that you will the perfect font for your perfect project in this round-up. Please note, licenses to have a tendency to change so please double check before usage.
http://speckyboy.com/2010/10/03/50-beautiful-and-fresh-free-fonts/

679 Trevor Marshall's ETI3600, ETI4600 International Music Synthesisers and Maplin 3800 and Maplin 5600s Stereo Synthesisers
Many years ago the Australian magazine "Electronics Today International" published my designs for two partly digital, mostly analog, Electronic Music Synthesisers. the ETI 3600 and ETI 4600. Both were made available as kits of components Barry Wilkinson at ETI was responsible for the final packaging and kitting coordination. Maplin Electronics Ltd.(in the UK) subsequently picked up the designs, which they marketed as as the Maplin models 3800 and 5600s Electronic Music Synthesisers At the time I held two Australian provisional patents for the technologies I used in the Synthesiser designs. One related to the method for generating sawtooth waveforms, the other was for the method of using commutated resistors in voltage controlled filters. I never made any money out of the designs, or the patents, which have long ago been allowed to lapse. But it was fun! The original constructional articles for the ETI 3600/4600 can be found in these PDFs: October 1973, December 1973, January 1974, Feb 1974, March 1974, April 1974, July 1974, March 1975, April 1975, May 1975, August 1975 Although the earliest (4004) microprocessors were available at that time, it was not until the late-70's that I first started programming fully digital (Signetics 2650 based) Microcomputer systems. Consequently my early digital designs were hardware, and not firmware, based. Of course, these days, everything in my hardware and firmware is based on software designs - even the interconnections are controlled by the software in the EPLDs and PALs, instead of by wires. So many things have changed over the years.... Here is a mug shot of the Maplin 3800:
http://www.trevormarshall.com/eti.htm

672 101 Absolutely Breathtaking Infrared Photographs | Tutorial9
There is nothing quite like Infrared Photography. In this showcase, over 100 phenomenal photos have been gathered, as well as some tutorials and equipment suggestions for aspiring photographers. freebies & resources,roundups
http://www.tutorial9.net/resources/101-absolutely-breathtaking-infrared-photographs/

660 What's Next: fully ergonomic laptops? | VentureBeat
When the first laptops were created around 1979 — laptops like the Grid Compass — ergonomics was not exactly a core concern. The screens were only 2-4 inches, RAM was a few hundred kilobytes, and batteries were huge. The Osbourne 1 weighed 24 pounds, perhaps making it the first portable computer and dumbbell. Hooray for convergence! Modern clamshell and tablet designs have solved many of these issues: screen sizes exceed 17”, RAM can be several gigabytes, and weight can be less than three pounds, deservedly earning names like the Air. What hasn’t been solved is ergonomics, and that’s a costly problem. The U.S. Department of Labor reported 650,000 cases of work-related muscular disorders, costing businesses an estimated $20 billion in medical claims and lost productivity. An ergonomically ideal computer setup aligns the top of the screen with our eye level, lets our arms and wrists straighten, and allows our shoulders to relax. Because laptop screens are attached to their keyboards, they require a damaging trade-off: place the laptop at eye level and hunch our shoulders, or place the keyboard at arm level and bend our neck. Most laptop keyboards are also rectangles, requiring wrist twisting. The result is chronic neck, shoulder, and wrist pain, and with laptop use increasing, this problem will only get worse.
http://venturebeat.com/2009/08/14/whats-next-fully-ergonomic-laptops/

636 The Beginner’s Guide to Zen Habits – A Guided Tour | zen habits
‘Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh Post written by Leo Babauta. Follow me on Twitter. Note: This is an update to the old guide — so it should be interesting to readers new and old. While some of you have been following Zen Habits since its early days (beginning of 2007), many of you are fairly new readers. To help you through the fairly overwhelming archives, I’ve compiled a beginner’s guide. Kind of a Quick Start guide. First, a note: Please don’t try to go through this all at once. There are days and days worth of reading here. I’ve just organized that so that you can go to the stuff you want to learn about first. Take it in small chunks. Where do you start when you have a thousand posts to read through? You start with the best, or at least the most popular. So here they are: Most Popular Posts breathe. be still. a brief guide to life. the best goal is no goal the lost art of solitude the elements of living lightly the zen of doing The Ultimate How to Get Lean Guide. simplify, and savor life How Not to Hurry Email Sanity: How to Clear Your Inbox When You’re Drowning the barefoot philosophy The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People How Not to Hurry The Simple, Ridiculously Useful Guide to Earning a Living from Your Passion 10 Benefits of Rising Early, and How to Do It 20 Things I Wish I Had Known When Starting Out in Life Simple Living Manifesto: 72 Ideas to Simplify Your Life A Guide to Creating a Minimalist Home Get Off Your Butt: 16 Ways to Get Motivated When You’re in a Slump
http://zenhabits.net/start/

616 Alphabet Soup modular synth
The STS Serge Modular can be a daunting system at first blush, especially for those who come from an "East Coast" modular synth background. My first synthesizers were Moog analogs and my first Analog Modular Synth was an Arrick "Dotcom" system - so I started out with East Coast paradigms that I had to "unlearn" in order to use my Serge Modular to the fullest. For those of you coming from a similar background or those just discovering the Serge Modular for the first time, these "Alphabet Soup" pages are dedicated to you! The Serge Modular is intuitive and fun to use - especially when you realize the main difference between a Serge Modular and most others has to do with the size of the building blocks, where a Moog or similar modular will have monolithic building blocks like ADSRs and Oscillators, the Serge can be more "low-level" in that you can build ADSRs and oscillators from Serge modules or, more properly, Function Blocks. These Function Blocks usually come bearing arcane names that have been shortened to an "Alphabet Soup" conglomeration of acronyms. In this series of articles, I'll be talking about some of the ways to approach these Function Blocks to create much more useful, surprising, complex or just simply fun synthesis features. The first function block we're going to look at is the "DSG", otherwise known as the Dual Universal Slope Generator. This mild-mannered module is in some ways the most powerful one in the entire Serge catalog because it can become so many different things depending on where you place the patch cords...as you'll soon see.
http://www.carbon111.com/alphabet1.html

614 digital life - Digicult.it
DIGITAL LIFE, is a project dedicated to the digital future and to the cross-fertilization between technology, new media and contemporary artistic expressions. On the 3 March 2010, this project inaugurates La Pelanda, a new location in the newly refurbished ex-abattoirs in Testaccio for contemporary artistic and cultural productions. These premises have been renovated for the city by the Rome Municipality as part of the Zone attive Project. Digital Life, Richard Castelli, Romaeuropa, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Shiro Takatani, Jeffrey Shaw, Ulf Langheinrich, Jean Michel Bruyère, Erwin Redl, Thomas McIntosh, Emmanuel Madan, Martux-m, Mikko Hynninen, Julien Maire, Christian Partos, digicult, digital culture, culture, digital, electonics arts, arts, elecronics, promotions and circulation, circulation
http://www.digicult.it/en/2010/digitallife.asp

608 Stories In Flight | HTML5/CSS3 Cheatsheet
Here are some simple cut-and-paste examples of HTML5/CSS3 features that are currently (mid-2010) usable across a number of web browsers, chief among them Firefox, Safari, Chrome and Opera. For many of the CSS3 examples, Internet Explorer is the lone holdout with a limited number of workarounds, however these features degrade gracefully and may still be useful on new projects as long as this limitation is kept in mind. Both for SVG and Canvas there exist solid workarounds in the form of JavaScript libraries that allow even Internet Explorer to display these new objects, and in the case of SVGweb it may be a good idea to use this workaround for all browsers to limit the variability of the SVG rendering across platforms. Please note: With the exception of SVGWeb, no Internet Explorer workarounds have been included on this page - most of the examples will therefore not work in IE6, IE7 or IE8. And if you want to discuss any of the code below or leave a correction or suggestion, you can leave comments below and here is also The Web We Should Have on my blog. Thanks! On this page: HTML5 DOCTYPE Rounded Corners Rounded Corners Redux: Circles Box Shadows Text Shadows Border Images Transform Rotate Column Layout SVG Canvas Canvas Text Canvas Text Rotate Some more complex subjects are also discussed in these separate pages: CSS3 Transforms Ruby Annotations Multiple Background Images HTML5 Audio and JavaScript Control HTML5 Audio Data API - Spectrum Visualizer JavaScript: Binary Loader Google Font API and Font Loading Behavior JavaScript: Sorting DIVs JavaScript: HTML5 Video with SRT Subtitles ...and don't forget to leave some comments below!
http://www.storiesinflight.com/html5/

576 55 Excellent Examples of Websites Using HTML5 | Inspiration
Html 5 is the new and updated version of the web standard and famous HTML. The HTML 5 has tons of new features, techniques and elements that allow designers to create new and beautiful stuff in short line codes. The new standard incorporates features like video playback and drag-and-drop that have been previously dependent on third-party browser plug-ins such as Adobe Flash, Microsoft Silverlight, and Google Gears. With HTML5 you can add some really nice effects to your website without loosing your head to do it... it's for sure a nice way to go. html,html5,inspiration,web design
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/55-excellent-examples-of-websites-using-html5/

547 Din Sync: How to modify a Korg Monotron
So here's how to modify Korg's new Monotron analog ribbon synthesizer. Perhaps this is the first document of Monotron mods in Europe since it still hasn't been released here. It's actually a very easy machine to modify because for whatever reason Korg decided to label all the interesting points on the bottom side of the PCB. This may well have been for testing units at the factory/service centers. Perhaps though it could have been that the designers anticipated this little machine would be hacked, much like the Gakken which pretty obviously inspired this piece. Incidentally in the magazine that comes with the Gakken there's a picture of them showing it to Korg, that was in 2008, go figure.
http://www.dinsync.info/2010/06/how-to-modify-korg-monotron.html

529 SynthesisWorkshops
synth modular Sound synthesis and sound design Music has brought pleasure and entertainment to mankind throughout the whole of history. Each person is by nature equipped with one of the most elaborate and emotional musical instruments; the human voice. Whenever people feel good music seems to fit the occasion, and it is considered quite natural to hum or sing a song. Musical instruments have brought their own moods to music and at the current moment in human evolution there is an enormous variety of musical instruments available. The twentieth century has seen the development of a range of new and exciting electronic musical instruments. These electronic instruments are very flexible, they can produce a wide range of timbres and can be amplified to whatever loudness level sounds best for the occasion. Most of these electronic instruments are played by a keyboard, but in essence the keyboard can be replaced by any electromechanical device that is able to transform a movement caused by a human interaction into an electrical signal that can drive the sound generating core of the electronic instrument. All sorts of technical and scientific developments have helped to create electronic instruments and the human interface to play them. Still, music is an art and not really a hard science, although music and sound have for a long time been subject to various scientific research. An important realization is that science can not really explain why much music is such a pleasure to listen to and such a joy to make. Which is not a bad thing, as probably no one is waiting for science to take the fun out of music by applying formalized rules and templates on what is also subject to ‘feel’. So, although this book covers techniques that lean heavily on scientific research, the application of these techniques will in general be aimed at creating fun. There are a lot of professionals working with sound and even more people that make music for their personal enjoyment. Mastery of sound synthesis is valuable to all of them. Still, it won’t be easy to please everyone with one single book, as some people will be more interested in how things work and others might want practical examples that just work. The aim of this book is that it can at least be used as a practical guide in workshops and courses in electronic music, covering some essential basics that are needed to operate the equipment used in sound synthesis in a way that makes some sense. Additionally it can be used to explore techniques to find out how they can help in the development of one’s own musical style. Sound synthesis is the art of creating sounds by using suitable electronic means, using either analog or digital electronic devices. Sound design is the art of creating particular sounds using sound synthesis techniques. The definition of sound design as used here might be confusing to some, as the name sound design is also used in the discipline in industrial design that occupies itself with how mass produced objects should sound. Examples are how the sound of cars or ladyshaves are ‘designed’ to sound pleasing while in use. Which of course has nothing to do at all with music or sound synthesizers. This book puts the emphasis on the various synthesis techniques for musical purposes and how to setup sound synthesizers to create a large range of characteristic musical sounds. The art of musical sound design is left to the artist.
http://www.xs4all.nl/~rhordijk/G2Pages/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

466 Musicians – This Is How You Create A Great Looking Facebook Page
Like most of you, I too LIKE Facebook, and ever since my last TechCrunch post (How to Build Engaging One-of-Kind Facebook Fan Pages), I've been exploring and trying to find new ways to improve the creation process of a Page. This time, I'd like to focus on a how-to for the musicians among you.
http://techcrunch.com/2010/06/27/facebook-musicians-page/

448 HTML Ampersand Character Codes
These are character sequences that may appear in HTML documents; they represent sometimes useful symbols that are not part of the standard ASCII set or that would be difficult or impossible to type otherwise (e.g. the less-than sign, which would always be mistaken for the beginning of an HTML tag). Case is signinficant. The content of this table has been throughly tested. If the character that appears in the first column does not fit the description in the third column, your browser has a screw loose.
http://rabbit.eng.miami.edu/info/htmlchars.html

431 Exploring the software behind Facebook, the world’s largest site | Royal Pingdom
At the scale that Facebook operates, a lot of traditional approaches to serving web content break down or simply aren’t practical. The challenge for Facebook’s engineers has been to keep the site up and running smoothly in spite of handling close to half a billion active users. This article takes a look at some of the software and techniques they use to accomplish that.
http://royal.pingdom.com/2010/06/18/the-software-behind-facebook/

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front … if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant Donnés, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

423 MACBETH STUDIO SYSTEMS
Welcome to MacBeth Synthesizers! LATEST NEWS: 20/07/09 please scroll down for infoOver the last year and half or so, more products have been developed. Work has gone into the design of a new modular synthesizer system shared by two formats- the 3U format and the 5U format. The designs are relatively new but still retain the inherant qualities of the M3X, M5 and M5N synthesizers. The system is called the X-Series Modular Synthesizer after the popular M3X and its protégé keyboard synthesizer the X-Factor. This fully analogue keyboard is still under serious development and there will be more information to follow on that one. As a refreshing change from making the large scale semi modular M5 and M5N, I am now delving into the production of smaller, free for all systems that will probably grow large! I'm taking into it all my experience of designing both large and small analogue synthesizers as well as a few new ideas too. Please take the time to look around this website. In each catagory there is product information, sounds, tracks and links to other related media on the internet. Currently the 3U X-Series Dual Oscillator and 'Backend' Filter Combo are in production. I expect delivery of the Dual Oscillator within the next two weeks- shortly after that the 'Backend' Filter Combo will roll out of production. Please contact any of the Distributers listed to get your modules. I intend to produce a short run of the 5U modules soon, so once again- stay tuned for that... ...anyway! I have uploaded quite a few demo sounds on here- maybe not to everyones taste- but at least they make you think of what these modules could do in the right hands, i.e. you! - after all- I'm an engineer, not a muscian as such!...Well you decide! All MacBeth Products are built to exacting standards- from materials selection to the physical build. The PCBs and Sheet Metalwork are fabricated by Zot Engineering from Musselburgh, Scotland http://www.zot.co.uk and final assembly is performed by Diatron Assembly Systems from Norwich, England http://www.diatron.co.uk Both companies also manufacture equipment for the medical, military and aerospace sectors of industrial engineering
http://www.macbethstudiosystems.com/

416 Welcome to the Modular Corner
Welcome to the Modular Corner! This site is intended as a resource for all users of the Pulsar / Scope Modular synth, a software synthesizer which comes with the Scope range of soundcards from Sonic Core (formerly Creamware). Here you will find information about the Modular Synth, it's various components, the many patches that are available for the Synth along with other related documents and links to do with all things Modular. On the Patches page, you will find information about individual patches that have been created for the Modular. This aims to be a complete listing of all the Modular patches that have become available, with a brief description of the patch. Where possible this will include a more detailed description, mp3 examples, signal flow diagrams, etc, in order to build up a more comprehensive 'manual' for the many patches that are available. The downloads page has other related resources, such as freeware modules, documents on modular synthesis, etc. Your contributions are vital - If you made a patch that you're proud of, or if you've downloaded someone else's that you like - let me know. I can't write up every patch on my own.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/index.html

370 Welcome, WebM <video>
In February 2007, 1177 days ago to be exact, Opera proposed the <video> element and we published a manifesto for video on the Web. When proposing <video>, we knew there would be two challenges. The first was easy: to get consensus around the syntax. We wanted <video> to be as easy to use as <img>. The second was harder: to find an open and freely-usable high quality video format. The web has always been open and freely-usable; Tim didn’t patent HTML, I didn’t patent CSS and Brendan didn’t patent JavaScript. The big news today is that WebM will join the list of open and freely usable Web formats, and video will finally become a first-class citizen of the Web. This is a big deal, and the day will be remembered in the history of the Web. At Opera, we’re proud to add support for WebM into a Labs build — you can download this build for:
http://labs.opera.com/news/2010/05/19/

369 How to Install Mac OS X on a PC (Without Using a Mac)
There are many great tutorials on the web for using a Mac to install Mac OS X Snow Leopard on a PC. Unfortunately, you may be unable to follow such tutorials if you do not readily have access to a Mac to perform the preparation necessary for the installation. Great progress has been made in hacking PCs to run OS X, and it is now possible to install Mac OS X without a Mac. Thanks to some great tools put together by some brilliant hackers, it is also much easier and does not involve nearly as much time and effort as was once required.
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-install-mac-os-x-on-a-pc-without-using-a-mac/

365 15 Best And Useful Websites For Graphic Designers
Graphic designing is always been a challenging part for designers as it is the most important part of any design project. So every designer try hard to make themselves strong in graphic designing. Fonts, Icons, Logos, Typography, Textures, Vectors etc. are the part of graphic designing. For any website designing, graphic designers always think about the logo design and choosing the right font to make any website graphically attractive and appealing. So, in this article, we are providing 15 best websites for graphic designer which are very useful for designers to take inspiration on different aspects of graphic designing.
http://resources.savedelete.com/15-best-and-useful-websites-for-graphic-designers.html

364 What every programmer should know about memory, Part 1 [LWN.net]
Editor's introduction: Ulrich Drepper recently approached us asking if we would be interested in publishing a lengthy document he had written on how memory and software interact. We did not have to look at the text for long to realize that it would be of interest to many LWN readers. Memory usage is often the determining factor in how software performs, but good information on how to avoid memory bottlenecks is hard to find. This series of articles should change that situation. The original document prints out at over 100 pages. We will be splitting it into about seven segments, each run 1-2 weeks after its predecessor. Once the entire series is out, Ulrich will be releasing the full text. Reformatting the text from the original LaTeX has been a bit of a challenge, but the results, hopefully, will be good. For ease of online reading, Ulrich's footnotes have been placed {inline in the text}. Hyperlinked cross-references (and [bibliography references]) will not be possible until the full series is published. Many thanks to Ulrich for allowing LWN to publish this material; we hope that it will lead to more memory-efficient software across our systems in the near future.
https://lwn.net/Articles/250967/

362 90+ Essential Social Media Resources
Check out our extensive list of social media, business, mobile and tech resources. No matter what you're into, you're sure to find it here! Business Lists,Facebook Lists,Lists,Megalists,Mobile Lists,Social Media Lists,Twitter Lists,business,facebook,features,iPhone Resource Lists,social media,twitter,youtube Now you’ve gone and done it. You’ve come across a list so enormous, so useful, and so awesome, our futile attempts to describe it have been lost in the tubes of cyberspace. We’ll just say this: No matter what you’re into — Twitter, Facebook, Mobile Apps, Business Development, or good-old-fashioned YouTube hilarity — you will find it below. So put down your barbeque, send out another huge thanks to our men and women in uniform, and limber up your scrolling finger — it’s a big one. If you dig the uber-list, be sure to send some comments our way down below!
http://mashable.com/2010/05/31/92-essential-social-media-resources/

325 Electronic_a # 11: Jeudi 29 avril 2010
Ben Edwards est un humble artisan amoureux de l’analogique, archéologue des temps pré-électroniques. "la musique synthétique", comme on l’appelait alors. Ben collectionne les synthétiseurs et en a accumulé une quantité invraisemblable. Si les noms suivants ne vous disent rien, Korg Modular, Oberheim SEM, Roland 100 M … souvenez-vous de Abbey Road ou de Blade Runner. C'est tout un pan de la musique pop qui fut irrigué des vibrations quasi cosmiques de ces machines et c’est une âme singulière et poétique que nous retrouverons ainsi ce soir. Ce que la presse en dit: « De son vrai nom Ben Edwards, Benge développe depuis ses premiers pas musicaux une passion peu commune pour les synthétiseurs, passion qui l’a conduit à amasser au fil du temps une collection de machines qui ferait baver d’envie bien des aficionados de la chose. Obsédé par cette famille d’instruments aux possibilités infinies et compositeur stakhanoviste si il en est, Benge passe sa vie à disséquer les algorithmes abscons de chacune de ses machines qu’il connaît jusqu’au plus profond de leur process électroniques » - A découvrir absolument « Album concept que ce Twenty Systems puisqu’il s’agit, en vingt pistes plutôt courtes, de présenter vingt synthétiseurs différents, un par année de 1968 à 1988. Dans un esprit didactique, le disque est accompagné d’un livret cartonné de 52 pages détaillant les caractéristiques de chaque synthétiseur tandis que les morceaux portent le nom de l’instrument ayant été utilisé pour chacun et l’année correspondante (utilisation unique et solitaire d’ailleurs, Ben Edwards indiquant n’avoir employé aucun autre effet ou appareil en dehors de ces synthétiseurs). » - Etherreal « Avec ce disque poétique, à la naïveté parfois désarmante (Yamaha CS30) mais toujours très inspiré, Benge nous fait voyager à travers les époques et rend un bel hommage à ces machines pleines de chaleur (qui sont pour certaines de véritables antiquités !) et à leurs géniaux créateurs. Rarement une leçon d'histoire aura été aussi délicieuse que celle-ci. » - Pop News « La musique de Ben Edwards est en effet bien plus et bien moins qu'un impossible catalogue de sons ou une ode technopositiviste : c'est un réenchantement viscéral du son électronique. » - Chronic’art « A brilliant contribution to the archaeology of electronic music » - Brian Eno « Indicates what a deliriously desirable thing the synthesis of sound has historically been » - The Wire « Absolutely cast iron irrefutable proof that synthesisers are better than guitars » - Vice Magazine
http://bellegarde.toulouse.fr/archives/154-electronica11

316 100 Fresh And Free xHTML Templates Of Year 2010
If you remember some long time at 1stwebdesigner we published huge 2-part article (part 1, part 2) with 202 free HTML templates there, time has been passed and this is follow-up articles. This time you will find here just really new templates, mostly created in this year 2010! Hopefully this article will be good success as well, because I think these templates can really help if you need to complete any fast project, see how things work and finally get inspired! Enjoy!
http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/freebies/fresh-free-xhtml-templates-2010/

298 The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook
Facebook is a great service. I have a profile, and so does nearly everyone I know under the age of 60. However, Facebook hasn't always managed its users' data well. In the beginning, it restricted the visibility of a user's personal information to just their friends and their "network" (college or school). Over the past couple of years, the default privacy settings for a Facebook user's personal information have become more and more permissive. They've also changed how your personal information is classified several times, sometimes in a manner that has been confusing for their users. This has largely been part of Facebook's effort to correlate, publish, and monetize their social graph: a massive database of entities and links that covers everything from where you live to the movies you like and the people you trust. This blog post by Kurt Opsahl at the the EFF gives a brief timeline of Facebook's Terms of Service changes through April of 2010. It's a great overview, but I was a little disappointed it wasn't an actual timeline: hence my initial inspiration for this infographic.
http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/

297 Synth Finder v5
Find the synth that is right for you! Now you can easily find the synthesizer that you have been searching for. Simply choose the options from the menu to the left that best describe the types of synthesizers you are looking for and we'll do the rest! You may choose any options and in any combination. For example, simply choose 'Analog' for a complete list of all analog synths, or get more specific and choose additional options for a more personalized set of results. Note that we only list synths that are featured in our database here at the Vintage Synth Explorer. For more details and descriptions of what the Synth Finder options mean, click here.
http://www.vintagesynth.com/synthfinder/

284 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Tip
Alesis Andromeda A6 Tip If you own an Andromeda, give this a try. Via this gearslutz thread where you'll find additional details, via mister bunty on AH: "For those that asked, here's the thread on gearslutz that explains the waveshaping that happens above level 30. I know it sounds crazy, but if you keep the levels pre-mix below 30 total (yes, total!) and then the filter/ringmod/postmix levels around 70 at sum, you'll hear a whole new definition. I tried it on a crappy set of headphones and was amazed. Then, I listened through my bluesky monitors and a set of NS-10s, and couldn't believe the detail I had been missing. For me, at least, the juice and "vintage-ness" of the Andy was discovered." http://www.gearslutz.com/board/electronic-music-instruments-electronic-music-production/473535-what-does-andromeda-do-better-6.html#post5206610
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/05/alesis-andromeda-a6-tip.html

279 VI Editor / Linux Terminal Cheat Sheet (PDF) - Smashing Magazine
We've been releasing many icon sets and WordPress themes on Smashing Magazine, yet today we are glad to announce the release of a bit different freebie. This post... freebies, design, magazine, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons, css, fonts
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/05/03/vi-editor-linux-terminal-cheat-sheet-pdf/

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/01/alesis-andromeda-aurora.html

202 How Accessible is Your Website? 8 Tools to Analyze Your Website’s Level of Accessibility | Spyre Studios
Designing a website that's as much successful as it is effective takes time, skills, and a lot of testing. Normally, when we're talking about web design and we hear the word testing, the first thing that comes to mind is usability, and that's fine, but when was the last time you sat down to analyze the level of accessibility of your website? Testing on other aspects of your website are important, however, a lot of us seem to neglect our websites accessibility. This can ultimately lead to the loss of a wide range of users and poor elements of design. But not to fear, below we've compiled a set of tools that will help you combat poor accessibility. Every tool is free to use and has been chosen because it's easy to use and offers quality testing. accessibility,tools
http://spyrestudios.com/website-accessibility-tools/

199 20 Portable Applications Web Designers Should Have On Their USB Sticks | Design Reviver
Portable applications have been known to be used by the professional on-the-go for quite some time now. These amazingly lightweight applications allow us to portable,usb,usb drive,web designer
http://designreviver.com/tips/20-portable-applications-web-designers-should-have-on-their-usb-sticks/

143 Granular Synthesis: Resource Site
This web site has been designed as a major reference site for the sound synthesis technique known as granular synthesis. It contains some software, music, essays, publications and lots of other information
http://granularsynthesis.com/index.php

135 all - dj accessories - Turntablelab.com
we started the Lab in 1998, our first year out of college. Turntable Lab was established in 1998 by Anthony Cattarina, Jasper Goggins, and Peter Hahn. The trio formed the idea for the Lab based on numerous negative experiences at stores that sold dj equipment: both big musical instrument chains and shady Canal Street stereo stores. Turned off by haggling, uninformed salesmen, and questionable product, Turntable Lab built its business on fair pricing, informed reviews, and a well researched selection of “Lab approved” items. Most of the Lab's employees are working djs / producers / musicians, which helps to ensure this high standard. The business model was an immediate success, establishing rapid growth and a dedicated customer base. Turntable Lab soon applied their business model to other areas including recorded music, production equipment, clothing, and books. Each expansion has been met with success, and today Turntable Lab is a recognized tastemaker in all those areas. To bring the Turntable Lab experience directly to consumers, Turntable Lab opened its first retail location in 2001. In December of 2005, Turntable opened its flagship store in Hollywood, California. Currently the Turntable Lab headquarters is located in Brooklyn, New York.
http://www.turntablelab.com/dj_equipment/42/2204/

74 The RayographsBlog MySpace de |
The Rayographs are Astrud Steehouder on guitar and vocals, Jessamine Tierney on bass and vocals and Amy Hurst on drums and occasional vocals. The motivation that glues this band together has been the attempt to create a sound that satifies a combined aesthetic; the intention to write songs that resonate. The songs are ideas-based: cropped observational narratives, stark impressions of strange histories, dark blue cinematic lynchian atmospherics cut with sharp drums and curious basslines.
http://blogs.myspace.com/therayographs

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