100SILEX, de 0 100 s: better
1522 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader
secure tt-rss, tt-rss security 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader July 27, 2015 by Anand Leave a Comment secure-tt-rss-ft Share: share htpcBeginner We recently presented Tiny Tiny RSS to you as a great alternative to Google reader, which is one more way you can extend the functionality of your home server or your hosting space. Hopefully, you already exported your data from Google Reader. In this post, we will show you how to secure TT-RSS reader to prevent unauthorized access. Tiny Tiny RSS is an open source web-based news feed (RSS/Atom) reader and aggregator, designed to allow you to read news from any location, while feeling as close to a real desktop application as possible. As we previously explained, it makes an ideal candidate to replace Google Reader. While there are services like Feedly and Newsblur grabbing the crowd Google Reader, which some of you may prefer, there are a group of people who would like to run a RSS reader on their own server and keep things private. Assuming that you have already installed Tiny Tiny RSS on your alternative to Google reader or hosting space, we will now show you how to secure TT-RSS reader. Secure TT-RSS Reader One of the main reasons to move to an RSS aggregator like TT-RSS is maintaining your privacy. So if you do not secure TT-RSS reader well you are not only making your data available public but also making your system vulnerable to potential attacks. Choosing a strong username and password while setting your TT-RSS is the first basic thing that you can do to secure TT-RSS reader. Listed below are few more ways you can increase TT-RSS reader’s security. 1. Rename TT-RSS Folder One of the first lines of defense is to not use tt-rss in your URL to access your TT-RSS reader. To do this on your hosting account, use a folder name other than tt-rss while installing TT-RSS. On your Linux home server, edit /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf and change the first /tt-rss to something else. An example is shown below. TT-RSS Rename URL TT-RSS Rename URL After making the change, restart your TT-RSS and Apache to apply the changes: sudo service tt-rss restart sudo serivce apache2 reload Your TT-RSS reader is now available through the new URL (example: http://mydomain.com/myreader) only. Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 2. Enable SSL Accessing TT-RSS through http sends all information as unencrypted data. This could mean less privacy due to potential sniffing. The solution is to encrypt the data during transfer, which makes sniffing by hackers harder. To enable and enforce HTTPS access on Linux servers with Apache, install the following run-time libraries: sudo apt-get install libssl0.9.8 libpam0g openssl Restart your Apache server as shown above. You should now be able to access your TT-RSS reader with HTTPS. Note that you may have to have a SSL certificate generated. Refer to Apache documentation if you want to generate your own certificate. By default, the system will install self-signed certificates for you. These certificates are likely to raise warnings when you point your browser to the site. 3. Disable Single User Mode By default the single user mode is already disabled (in /etc/tt-rss/config.php). Enabling single user mode will also disable TT-RSS login system. Therefore, keep the single user mode disabled. Disable Single User Mode Disable Single User Mode A better way to make it a single user system is by limiting the number of registrations to 1 as described below. For whatever reason, you still want to enable single user mode, make sure you implement Apache Authentication method described below. 4. Self Registrations Self registrations allow a visitor to register themselves, which could reduce TT-RSS security. If your TT-RSS will be for personal use only, then you may want to disable user registration by setting “ENABLE_REGISTRATION” to “false”. TT-RSS Self Registrations TT-RSS Self Registrations To further secure TT-RSS Reader, uou may also want to change “REG_MAX_USERS” to “1” to make your account the only account on TT-RSS. asus n66uASUS RT-N66U Dual-Band Wireless-N900 Gigabit Router asus n66u reviewsFind out why it is rated the best wireless router in its class. 5. Apache Authentication Last but not the least, enable Authentication. This is even more important if you have enabled “Single User Mode” describe above. Every time you access TT-RSS, you will be asked for a username and password as shown in the picture below: Secure TT-RSS Reader On your hosting account this equivalent to password protecting a directory, in this case the TT-RSS directory. To do this on your Ubuntu server, you will have to create a .htpasswd file. More information is available in Apache documentation. But the easiest way to achieve this is to use one of the htpasswd generators available online. After you enter the username and password two code blocks will be generated. Copy the contents of the .htpasswd code block and save it to /etc/apache2/.htpasswd_ttrss. Next, copy the contents of the .htaccess code block and add it to /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf as shown below: TT-RSS Apache Authentication TT-RSS Apache Authentication Save and exit. Restart both TT-RSS and Apache previous shown above. You should be prompted for a password every time you try to access TT-RSS. Some may think that this double authentication method is an extra inconvenience. But I would rather be safe than sorry. Go ahead, secure Tiny Tiny RSS Reader and enjoy reading articles on your private secure RSS Reader.
http://www.htpcbeginner.com/secure-tt-rss-reader/

1502 Phone-Reluctant Introverts, There is Nothing Wrong With You
As I sit down to write this blog post there is the dreaded sound of a prolonged vibration as my phone skids, bouncing and sporadically across my desk. This is perfectly ideal and ironic distraction that actually befits the very thing I am thinking about and from which it is distracting me… Itself! I have always had an absolute detest for talking on the phone. And I’ll say now that it has nothing whatsoever to do with the person at the other end, I just find it a horrible tool for communicating with. Phone Box I think I probably am, and always have been worse than most people when it comes to using the phone (in the traditional sense, ie speaking to people) but if you can identify with any of this then read on. If you’re thinking, “what are you on about, I love the phone” then you’ll probably just get confused, but if you also have friends who ‘never answer the phone’ then this might help you to understand them a bit better. I can’t sum it up any better than Sophia Dembling in her article, 9 Signs that You Might Be an Introvert:
http://www.sheepdressedlikewolves.com/phone-reluctant-introvert/

1352 The Recording Revolution - Home Studio Tips To Help You Make Better Music Now

http://therecordingrevolution.com/category/5-minutes-to-a-better-mix/page/10/

1020 GnomeActivityJournal - GNOME Live!
GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Contents GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Overview Code Getting in touch Use cases Grouping and Filtering Features TODO GUI Sprints Architecture Long term goals Video Mockups And Current Usage Sub Pages See Zeitgeist for information about the Zeitgeist engine used internally by the GNOME Activity Journal. Overview The GNOME Activity Journal is a tool for easily browsing and finding files on your computer. It uses Zeitgeist to get information and metadata on what files/websites/contacts/etc. you worked with. Links: Zeitgeist Website, Zeitgeist on Launchpad, GNOME Activity Journal on Launchpad Code The Zeitgeist code is split into two modules: GNOME Activity Journal (GTK+ interface) Project page: https://launchpad.net/gnome-activity-journal Repository: bzr branch lp:gnome-activity-journal Zeitgeist Engine Project page: https://launchpad.net/zeitgeist Repository: bzr branch lp:zeitgeist Getting in touch Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~gnome-zeitgeist-users IRC: #zeitgeist @ irc.freenode.net, #gnome-zeitgeist @ irc.gimp.org Use cases John turns on his computer to work on his seminar paper. Instead of digging through his hierarchal file system, he simply opens up GNOME Activity Journal and clicks on the top item in the "Recently Used Files" list. When he realizes that he can't remember the name of the website that he was reading for research yesterday, he simply looks at the list of files related to his paper and clicks on the website. More at the Zeitgeist Vision page. Grouping and Filtering Our goal is to group/filter the data by: Type of data Source Time Name Tags Neighbouring Data Comments Location of use (GPS) Features Browse activities Drag and Drop (not for links) Tagging Auto tagging Searching Filtering by Dataproviders/Time/Tags Bookmark Data TODO GUI Sprints Add an actions toolbar to quickly share items by email or instant messaging. (See nautilus-share) Architecture Experiment with Tracker, Soylent, and Empathy. Long term goals Better metadata extraction (see some of the sprints above) Integration with other computers and mobile devices. Video Zeitgeist video GAJ video Mockups And Current Usage Some work was done by the City of Largo in the past which replicated some of the features of the Activity Journal. Possibly some of this work can result in ideas for improving the User Interface. Mockups And Usage. Sub Pages /BolzanoIdeas /CityOfLargo /Ideas
http://live.gnome.org/action/show/GnomeActivityJournal?action=show&redirect=GnomeZeitgeist

992 Troy Hunt: Who’s who of bad password practices – banks, airlines and more
Troy Hunt on observations, musings and conjecture about the world of software and technology Troy Hunt, blog, .NET, Azure, Backup, Bing, Blogger, Career Development, Code Quality, Conference, Database, Design Utopia, DotNetNuke, Enterprise Software Platform, Internet Explorer, iPhone, K2, LinkedIn, Media, NDepend, Online Identity, OWASP, People Management, Personal Development, Product Review, ReSharper, Security, SharePoint, Silverlight, Software Quality, SQL Injection, SQL Server, Subversion, Travel, Twitter, Visual Studio, Windows Mobile, XSS, Ah, passwords. Love ‘em or hate ‘em, they’re a necessary evil of the digital age. The reality is we all end up with an alphabet soup of passwords spread over dozens of various sites and services across the internet. Whilst we might not always practice it, we all know the theory of creating a good password; uniqueness, randomness and length. The more of each, the better. Of course we frequently don’t do this because of all sorts of human factors such as convenience, memory or simple unawareness of the risks. Still, when it’s a case of individuals electing not to create secure passwords, they really only have themselves to blame. But what happens when the website won’t allow you to create a secure password? Or at least when they severely constrain your ability to create long, random, unique passwords? And what about when they don’t allow you to send it between your computer and their server securely? Even worse, what happens when our most “secure” institutions implement lazy password policies? Unfortunately, all of this is pretty rampant practice.
http://www.troyhunt.com/2011/01/whos-who-of-bad-password-practices.html

945 BBC News - 'Music of the stars' now louder
The Kepler space telescope is significantly better at measuring the age and sizes of stars by measuring the sounds they make, say researchers at the AAAS conference.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12507032

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.
http://jhaible.de/polykorg/jh_polykorg_clone.html

865 Evolver.html
Just Beautiful! What an amazing instrument! The DSI Evolver has the signature "old school" timbre down pat as well as being able to provide digital timbres reminiscent of the Waldorf Q. There's certainly a "rougher" side available as well with all the feedback implementation and controled distortion. Being able to make PM type plucked and blown sounds is just icing on the cake. Dave Smith should be commended for a job well done. Just have a look at the Panel Layout to get a taste of what this beauty can dish out - the controls are pretty much laid out in the form of a signal path graphic. Be sure to visit Dave Smith's Website! Evolver Sound Examples There are a lot of demos of the Evolver on the web showcasing the gutsy harsh sounds of this beast so I decided to post demos of some of my own patches as examples of the "softer" more "vintage" side of the Evolver's timbre. I make no apologies for these unpolished recordings - these are merely sound samples ;) Resonant Plucked Pad This pad shows some of the rich resonant nature of the filter. Soft Lead This is a simple analog brass lead patch. FM Pad A fun patch with lots of motion made using my "Audio-rate Filter FM" programming tip below. Warm Pad A nice bland-vanilla pad ^_^ What can I say? I love pads... For more MP3 demos showing the full gamut of sounds the Evolver and Polyevolver are capable of, please visit the excellent website of Stefan Trippler! The Definitive Guide to Evolver This rather in-depth guide to the Evolver goes places and does things a mere manual can't. This labor-of-love was crafted by Anu Kirk and with his kind permission, I am offering this fantastic resource right here in PDF format! A much smaller version (400K) is here but it dosen't have internal hyperlinks. Programming Tips Here's a fun repository of programming tips for the Evolver in all its incarnations. Please email me if you would like to add some. Fingered Wave Sequence Submitted by Dave Bryce. This brilliant technique has to be heard to be believed! Plus, its one of those cool things unique to the Evolver! This particular tip is so full of detailed information that it gets its own page! Audio-rate Filter FM Submitted by James Maier. Use the "Audio Mod" parameter in the Filter section to frequency-modulate the cutoff with the analog oscillator. Add resonance until the filter is just on the edge of oscillation then mod the cutoff with just a little triangle LFO set at a very slow speed. Amazing moving chorusing pad and lead sounds can be made this way. Fatter Bass/Pad Sounds Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the same sound in both channels (detuned saws, for instance). With the filters at the 24dB setting, increasing resonance cuts the passband as on the Moog filters. Set Envelope 3 to minimum attack, maximum decay and release, and sustain to maximum. This "creates" an offset, a continuous "on" signal while the keys are gated. Modulate one filters' resonance up (just one), or of the overall resonance level is high, us it to modulate one filters' resonance to its minimum. You get the resonant character plus the size of the non-resonant filter. Use Tri and Sine waves on that side too. "Warmer" Sounds Submitted by James Maier. The Evolver can make many ultra-bright and buzzy sounds due to its extensive feedback and distortion stages but sometimes people miss the subtler side of the beast. For a warmer sound use little or no distortion, close the filter just a bit and turn off the feedback and delay lines. I've managed to get dead-on Prophet5 timbres this way. Adding "Punch" Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the envelopes to linear, and use a Mod to modulate AmpEnv All by itself (lin through log responses with positive and negative self-modulation). This is of course fun on the filter envelopes as well. More Vintage Character Submitted by Mike Peake. Oscillator Slop, set at 5, doesn't come close to the Moog and other old-timer movement, so add slight (1 or 2) LFO to pitch modulations, with individual LFOs per oscillator, and a touch of LFO to LFO rate modulation. A tad of Envelope 3 to pitch helps as well. Don't miss out on the 12dB filter setting Submitted by Mike Peake. The 24dB setting has much more resonance, but the 12dB setting can sound nice and plucky, and do nice slightly fuzzy pads etc. DSI Evolver Waveshape Charts Below are charts I've assembled of the digital waveforms and their spectra as currently used in the DSI Evolver synthesizers. Originally these waves were unique to the SCI ProphetVS vector synth. I find these waveform/spectra graphics really usefull when programming sounds - maybe you will as well. Pay special attention to the spectra as this info is sometimes much more useful than waveshape in determining actual timbre - even before you hear what the waveform sounds like. These are designed to be downloaded (right-click & "save target as"), and printed at 300dpi on 8.5" x 11" pages - don't resize these images before printing or you will lose useful detail. Use them as a handy refrence. This information was cobbled together from various scattered sources (with very special thanks to Achim Gratz!). Any errors or omissions are my own. ^_^ HAVE FUN!!! Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 As far as the origin of these waves is concerned, one of the original VS engineers, Chris Meyer, said: "The original waves for the VS were created three ways - extracting single-cycles from sampled sounds, using a custom additive synthesis program, and using a program Josh (Josh Jeffe, another VS engineer) slapped together called "Hacker" where you could draw the waveshape. These were fed straight from the computer through the filter and VCA of a Pro-One to figure out what they might sound like in a patch. And by the way, no PPG waveforms appear inside the VS - we had access to them, but in the end our consciences got the better of us. We did steal some waveforms from the Korg DW6000, but only by looking at the harmonic drawings on the front panel and trying to imitate them in our additive synthesis program." Modulation Matrix "Cheat Sheet" This chart shows all the modulation routing available on the Evolver. This same info is available in the manual but this can be printed on a single sheet of paper as a handy refrence! Evolver Wallpaper These I created just for fun and desktop "beautification" ;) 1280 X 1024 1024 X 768 800 X 600
http://www.carbon111.com/evolver.html

823 Avoid Added Stress by Just Deciding and Moving Forward
Because our brains have a way of creating a synthesized happiness when we don't get what we want, it's often hard for us to make a "wrong" decision. As a result, you're better off just deciding and moving forward. Avoid Added Stress by Just Deciding and Moving Forward, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/5719077/avoid-added-stress-by-just-deciding-and-moving-forward?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+lifehacker%2Ffull+%28Lifehacker%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

804 Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google)
You can Google just about anything, but it's not always your best resource for finding the exact answer to what you want. Here's a look at our top ten tools for finding better answers online. Top 10 Ways to Find Better Answers Online (that Aren't Google), software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/5714481/top-10-ways-to-find-better-answers-online-that-arent-google

767 The 5 types of programmers « Steven Benner's Blog
In my code journeys and programming adventures I’ve encountered many strange foes, and even stranger allies. I’ve identified at least five different kinds of code warriors, some make for wonderful comrades in arms, while others seem to foil my every plan. However they all have their place in the pantheon of software development. Without a healthy mix of these different programming styles you’ll probably find your projects either take too long to complete, are not stable enough or are too perfect for humans to look upon. The duct tape programmer The code may not be pretty, but damnit, it works! This guy is the foundation of your company. When something goes wrong he will fix it fast and in a way that won’t break again. Of course he doesn’t care about how it looks, ease of use, or any of those other trivial concerns, but he will make it happen, without a bunch of talk or time-wasting nonsense. The best way to use this person is to point at a problem and walk away. The OCD perfectionist programmer You want to do what to my code? This guy doesn’t care about your deadlines or budgets, those are insignificant when compared to the art form that is programming. When you do finally receive the finished product you will have no option but submit to the stunning glory and radiant beauty of perfectly formatted, no, perfectly beautiful code, that is so efficient that anything you would want to do to it would do nothing but defame a masterpiece. He is the only one qualified to work on his code. The anti-programming programmer I’m a programmer, damnit. I don’t write code. His world has one simple truth; writing code is bad. If you have to write something then you’re doing it wrong. Someone else has already done the work so just use their code. He will tell you how much faster this development practice is, even though he takes as long or longer than the other programmers. But when you get the project it will only be 20 lines of actual code and will be very easy to read. It may not be very fast, efficient, or forward-compatible, but it will be done with the least effort required. The half-assed programmer What do you want? It works doesn’t it? The guy who couldn’t care less about quality, that’s someone elses job. He accomplishes the tasks that he’s asked to do, quickly. You may not like his work, the other programmers hate it, but management and the clients love it. As much pain as he will cause you in the future, he is single-handedly keeping your deadlines so you can’t scoff at it (no matter how much you want to). The theoretical programmer Well, that’s a possibility, but in practice this might be a better alternative. This guy is more interested the options than what should be done. He will spend 80% of his time staring blankly at his computer thinking up ways to accomplish a task, 15% of his time complaining about unreasonable deadlines, 4% of his time refining the options, and 1% of his time writing code. When you receive the final work it will always be accompanied by the phrase “if I had more time I could have done this the right way”. Where do you fit? Personally, I’d have to classify myself as the perfectionist. So, which type of programmer are you? Or perhaps you know another programming archetype that is missing from my list? Post a comment below and I’ll add it to a new updated list.
http://stevenbenner.com/2010/07/the-5-types-of-programmers/

711 50 Excellent Photography-Related Tutorials
This is a collection of 50 of the best tutorials and guides we could find for helping you capture better digital photos. photography
http://sixrevisions.com/photography/50-excellent-photography-related-tutorials/

634 50 Free Expedient High-Resolution Fabric Textures | Naldz Graphics
Textures serve a big advantage in making websites and other graphics design projects better looking and efficient. Another great thing about it is that you can find it anywhere,in your town, maybe in streets, or even in your homes. Examples of this are fabric textures from your clothes, linen or any fabric materials you have. After capturing the texture it can help your blog in making it more effective and giving it a nice touch. In our next post, we will be showcasing 50 Free Expedient High-Resolution Fabric Textures. We have collected some of the beautiful fabric textures that have different designs for you to choose from. They all are high-resolution images and best of all, they all come for free. Don’t hesitate to check them out, these showcase may include the texture that will suite your taste. Come, take a peek, and choose your pick.
http://naldzgraphics.net/freebies/50-free-expedient-high-resolution-fabric-textures/

610 . � ��'�i|�,_ � ��'�i|�,_ . welcome @ deep!sonic � ��'�i|�,_ . � ��'�i|�,_ .
.:[ Hello Electromusic Lovers ! ]:. Es ist gelogen, dass Videogames Kids beeinflussen. Hätte PAC MAN das getan, würden wir heute durch dunkle Räume irren, Pillen fressen und elektronische Musik hören! (Christian Wilson, Nintendo Inc., 1989) In deep!sonic i primary show my musican side in my life. More and more also people come here to watch the balance in my life - photography in nature. I like the world wide web and found lot of information and answers. Because this i feel better to give a little bit back and presents my works here in deep!sonic. But more i think it's important to feel and life culture with all kinds.
http://www.deepsonic.ch/

575 SymKat» SymKat | SSH: Tips And Tricks You Need
The most-used SSH client remains OpenSSH's ssh. Read on to find Tips and Tricks to make your experience even better!
http://symkat.com/35/ssh-tips-and-tricks-you-need/

366 How to Track Down Anyone Online
When you're trying to find someone online, Google's not the only game in town. In the last two years, a handful of new people search engines have come onto the scene that offer better ways to pinpoint people info by name, handle, location, or place of employment. While there's still no killer, one-stop people search, there are more ways than ever to track down a long-lost friend, stalk an ex, or screen a potential date or employee. The next time you wonder, "What ever happened to so-and-so?" you've got a few power people search tools to turn to. How to Track Down Anyone Online, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/329033/how-to-track-down-anyone-online/

325 Electronic_a # 11: Jeudi 29 avril 2010
Ben Edwards est un humble artisan amoureux de l’analogique, archéologue des temps pré-électroniques. "la musique synthétique", comme on l’appelait alors. Ben collectionne les synthétiseurs et en a accumulé une quantité invraisemblable. Si les noms suivants ne vous disent rien, Korg Modular, Oberheim SEM, Roland 100 M … souvenez-vous de Abbey Road ou de Blade Runner. C'est tout un pan de la musique pop qui fut irrigué des vibrations quasi cosmiques de ces machines et c’est une âme singulière et poétique que nous retrouverons ainsi ce soir. Ce que la presse en dit: « De son vrai nom Ben Edwards, Benge développe depuis ses premiers pas musicaux une passion peu commune pour les synthétiseurs, passion qui l’a conduit à amasser au fil du temps une collection de machines qui ferait baver d’envie bien des aficionados de la chose. Obsédé par cette famille d’instruments aux possibilités infinies et compositeur stakhanoviste si il en est, Benge passe sa vie à disséquer les algorithmes abscons de chacune de ses machines qu’il connaît jusqu’au plus profond de leur process électroniques » - A découvrir absolument « Album concept que ce Twenty Systems puisqu’il s’agit, en vingt pistes plutôt courtes, de présenter vingt synthétiseurs différents, un par année de 1968 à 1988. Dans un esprit didactique, le disque est accompagné d’un livret cartonné de 52 pages détaillant les caractéristiques de chaque synthétiseur tandis que les morceaux portent le nom de l’instrument ayant été utilisé pour chacun et l’année correspondante (utilisation unique et solitaire d’ailleurs, Ben Edwards indiquant n’avoir employé aucun autre effet ou appareil en dehors de ces synthétiseurs). » - Etherreal « Avec ce disque poétique, à la naïveté parfois désarmante (Yamaha CS30) mais toujours très inspiré, Benge nous fait voyager à travers les époques et rend un bel hommage à ces machines pleines de chaleur (qui sont pour certaines de véritables antiquités !) et à leurs géniaux créateurs. Rarement une leçon d'histoire aura été aussi délicieuse que celle-ci. » - Pop News « La musique de Ben Edwards est en effet bien plus et bien moins qu'un impossible catalogue de sons ou une ode technopositiviste : c'est un réenchantement viscéral du son électronique. » - Chronic’art « A brilliant contribution to the archaeology of electronic music » - Brian Eno « Indicates what a deliriously desirable thing the synthesis of sound has historically been » - The Wire « Absolutely cast iron irrefutable proof that synthesisers are better than guitars » - Vice Magazine
http://bellegarde.toulouse.fr/archives/154-electronica11

323 F.lux: software to make your life better
Ever notice how people texting at night have that eerie blue glow? Or wake up ready to write down the Next Great Idea, and get blinded by your computer screen? During the day, computer screens look good—they're designed to look like the sun. But, at 9PM, 10PM, or 3AM, you probably shouldn't be looking at the sun. f.lux F.lux fixes this: it makes the color of your computer's display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day. It's even possible that you're staying up too late because of your computer. You could use f.lux because it makes you sleep better, or you could just use it just because it makes your computer look better.
http://stereopsis.com/flux/

312 12 Applications to Make Your Facebook Page More Engaging
Currently, there are more than three million active Facebook Pages on the top ranked site, with the typical Page boasting an average of less than 1,000 fans – oops, I mean ‘likes‘ (seriously, that just doesn’t roll off your tongue quite the same way). Standing out from the static requires you to dress up your Page and make it more interesting and fun for your ‘likers’. That’s where Facebook applications come in. They’re basically like plugins for your Page and there are tens of thousands of them available. Deciding what apps you’d like to incorporate depends on how you’d like to engage with your peeps (that’s an even better word than ‘likers’). Here’s a compilation of some must have applications for any Page. They’re great additions to the the basic layout that Facebook provides and they can be used in interesting ways to move your ‘likes‘ into action.
http://www.socialmediatoday.com/SMC/197503/

284 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Tip
Alesis Andromeda A6 Tip If you own an Andromeda, give this a try. Via this gearslutz thread where you'll find additional details, via mister bunty on AH: "For those that asked, here's the thread on gearslutz that explains the waveshaping that happens above level 30. I know it sounds crazy, but if you keep the levels pre-mix below 30 total (yes, total!) and then the filter/ringmod/postmix levels around 70 at sum, you'll hear a whole new definition. I tried it on a crappy set of headphones and was amazed. Then, I listened through my bluesky monitors and a set of NS-10s, and couldn't believe the detail I had been missing. For me, at least, the juice and "vintage-ness" of the Andy was discovered." http://www.gearslutz.com/board/electronic-music-instruments-electronic-music-production/473535-what-does-andromeda-do-better-6.html#post5206610
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/05/alesis-andromeda-a6-tip.html

260 15 Applications For A Better Facebook Fan Page | Inspired Magazine
Time to boost popularity of your fan page with the right Facebook applications. facebook,promotion,fan page,apps,applications,marketing
http://www.inspiredm.com/2010/04/25/15-facebook-apps/

203 What does an Andromeda do better? - Gearslutz.com
Roland Jupiter 8 does its thing better than any other. Oberheim OBxa has its sound. Arp 2600 is unparalled. Prophet 5 set the bar. Moog Model D a What,does,Andromeda,do,better, What does an Andromeda do better?, recording, studio, microphone, mic pre, compressor, equalizer, pro tools, DAW, Nuendo, Cubase, SSL, Neve, Helios, review, reviews
http://www.gearslutz.com/board/electronic-music-instruments-electronic-music-production/473535-what-does-andromeda-do-better.html

89 Top 20+ MySQL Best Practices
Database operations often tend to be the main bottleneck for most web applications today. It's not only the DBA's (database administrators) that have to worry about these performance issues. We as programmers need to do our part by structuring tables properly, writing optimized queries and better code. Here are some MySQL optimization techniques for programmers.
http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/other/top-20-mysql-best-practices/

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