100SILEX, de 0 100 s: build
1495 Building a Custom HTML5 Audio Player with JavaScript - Forays In Web Development

http://www.alexkatz.me/html5-audio/building-a-custom-html5-audio-player-with-javascript/

1393 Top 25 Fantastic Soviet Buildings | English Russia
Interesting news from Russia in English language. Russia, Moscow, Russian news, Moscow news, Russian newspaper, daily news, independent news, reliable news, USSR, Soviet Union, CIS, Russian politics, Russian business, Russian culture, Russian opinion, St Petersburg, Saint Petersburg, oligarch, Kremlin, Berezovsky, Khodorkovsky, Abramovich, Putin, Yeltsin, Kursk, KGB, FSB, russia, news, russia news, finance, business, weather, sports, map of russia, newspapers, vladimir putin, prime minister, russia, russian, putin, government, post, journal, pravda, moscow times, rosbalt news agency, soccer, russes, spartak, lokomotiv, torpedo, cska, hockey, russia map, hotels, airlines, travel, government, soviet, union, russian, foreign currency rates, russian ruble, ruble, russia, news, russian news, russia journal, journal, latest news, russia weather, russia politics, russia daily news, norasco, russia journal news network, russia international, russia economy, russia business, russia moscow putin hotels flights visa to russia moscow st.petersburg translation business in russia, real estate russia, hotels russia, dating russia, brides russia
http://englishrussia.com/2013/11/19/top-25-fantastic-soviet-buildings/

1379 Comparing values of capacitance in µf, nf and pf.
A table comparing values of capacitance in µf, nf and pf. capacitors, capacitance, µf micro-farad, microfarad, micro-farads, microfarads, nf, nanofarad, nano-farad, nanofarads, nano-farads, picofarad, pico-farad, picofarads, pico-farads
http://www.repeater-builder.com/tech-info/capacitance-table.html

1362 Rock box Theme Tags
create make and build a rockbox theme
http://download.rockbox.org/daily/manual/rockbox-sansaclipplus/rockbox-buildap4.html#x20-354000D

1361 Java Online Compiler & Runner
Java Online Compiler IDE and Launcher for console programs and applets java compiler online, java compiler, online java compiler, applet compiler, java runner, java launcher, online java ide, java ide online, java program builder, online java publisher
http://www.browxy.com/

1315 Amanda Dunbar - World Class Bodybuilding Forum
Amanda Dunbar Female Bodybuilders Amanda,Dunbar, Amanda Dunbar, anabolic steroids,steroid forum,bodybuilding,bodybuilder,bodybuilding forum,bodybuilding supplement,muscle building,fitness,steroids,bodybuilding discussion,health,diet,fitness,steroid profiles,steroid information,steroid cycles, post cycle therapy,igf-1 reconstitution,best prohormones,fitness training,bodybuilding recipes,steroid conversion recipes
http://www.worldclassbodybuilding.com/forums/f465/amanda-dunbar-125896/

1314 Giant Bodybuilders,Female Bodybuilding,Woman Body Building Tips,Fitness Sliming Techniques

http://giant-bodybuilders.blogspot.fr/

1310 FFMPEG builds

http://aegiscorp.free.fr/ffmpeg/

1254 SONY TC-D5 Pro II, an impressive machine
Hi there, I received yesterday a SONT TC-D5 Pro II. I have seen it in photos and read comments about its quality, similar to the D6C. I liked so much the design with the two VU meters, and it seemed to me that it belongs to an era when build quality was driven by other rules.
http://www.stereo2go.com/displayForumTopic/content/284032791466040094?reply=288255372213350915

1132 Mammoth Modular Synthesizer At MIT Museum
Just got an update from Joe Paradiso on his homebuilt mammoth analog modular synthesizer. He’s installed it in the MIT Museum and has completed a fairly epic patch which you can listen to (24 hours a day!) here. Joe will be at the museum this Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm, demoing the synth to visitors, so be sure to stop by if you’re in the neighborhood. Here’s some info from Joe on the construction and inspiration for the latest patch. The second patch I made at the MIT Museum is totally done now, and you can hear it live on the stream. Listen to it at http://synth.media.mit.edu, and let me know what you think if you’re inclined – it’s running in physical space in Quad, of course – stereo on the stream. Note that this one has absolutely NO sequencer of any sort on it – all of the patterns you hear were made entirely from hand-patched logic (counters, ands, ors, flip flops, ring counters, rate multipliers, etc.). It’s an entirely different kind of composition environment from the norm – you really need to simultaneously be an engineer while being an artist and something of a performer. The inspiration for this patch started with the Boredoms – if you don’t know who they are, you should (http://www.boredoms.jp/). In particular, I was thinking of SuperRoots 9. The beauty of the patching interface is that you can never exactly nail what you start out to attain, but on the other hand, you get drawn into places you wouldn’t have normally gone once you start. The 3 drummers that Yamantaka Eye performs with lay down a compelling rhythm that my hand-patched logic and analog processing can’t match, of course. But this patch definitely has a strange jumpy groove once it gets into gear, and the 2-chord pad is archetypical too. Yes, Boredoms rule today! BTW, this patch took every cord I had, plus a good 30 more wires just shoved into the pin jacks – check out the photos here and here – the latter shows the kind of logic section patching complexity you need to build a sonic environment like this one. I’m ripping this baby out next Thursday, as I’ll be at the museum next Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm to demonstrate the synthesizer to visitors – doing some very simple patches and showing off what the modules do in case anybody is interested in this. It will run continuously until then. Otherwise, enjoy the stream – there are moments of introspective drift in-between wild percussion (yes, Boredoms!). I might pull the percussion line back so it doesn’t come so often or regularly, but it’s essentially a wrap.
http://synth.media.mit.edu/

1114 Custom EMS Oscillator Bank in Euro module format | Hinton Instruments News
Hinton Instruments has provided a custom rebuild of an EMS Board “C” into a 3U 62HP Eurorack format module incorporating all of Graham Hinton’s modifications and more, all within a 40mm depth. This is not a clone, we don’t do clones so don’t ask. The module is shown here mounted in our new four rail open Euro frame with rear mounted Triple 1A PSU module and our new ModMix module. The combination provides a very high specification, comprehensive modular synthesizer front end.
http://hinton-instruments.co.uk/wp/2011/05/18/custom-ems-oscillator-bank-in-euro-module-format/

1104 Custom EMS Oscillator Bank in Euro module format | Hinton Instruments News
Hinton Instruments has provided a custom rebuild of an EMS Board “C” into a 3U 62HP Eurorack format module incorporating all of Graham Hinton’s modifications and more, all within a 40mm depth. This is not a clone, we don’t do clones so don’t ask. The module is shown here mounted in our new four rail open Euro frame with rear mounted Triple 1A PSU module and our new ModMix module. The combination provides a very high specification, comprehensive modular synthesizer front end.
http://hinton-instruments.co.uk/wp/2011/05/18/custom-ems-oscillator-bank-in-euro-module-format/

1078 The Modular Synth
A long time ago, in a galaxy far away, before your local music shop was packed with the latest digital synths, even before the early analogue monosynths, if you wanted a synthesizer you had to make it yourself. Modular synthesis is not in itself a different type of synthesis, but refers to the fact that a synth would be built up from individual components (modules) , which would be linked together (patched) in a configuration decided by the person doing the building. Compared with today's 'plug and play' synths which come with 100's of presets, GM soundsets, etc, this has the obvious disadvantage that 'recalling' a preset can only be done if your synth is patched together in exactly the same way every time and every controller has to be manually set to the same parameter. However, the big advantage of Modular synthesis, of course, is that, providing you have the right components, you can build practically anything you want, without being constrained by the 'hardwired' configurations of modern factory built synthesizers. The Pulsar/Scope Modular synth, like any other Modular 'soft synth' brings together the advantages of both Modular synths and modern factory built synths. Modular configurations can be saved as patches for total recall later on, and each patch can contain any number of presets, again for later recall. Furthermore, with a software modular, you can re-use each component as many times as you wish within one patch, you never run out of cables, you don't have to dedicate a whole room to the synth and the modules never suffer from physical damage. What's more, each parameter can be controlled by MIDI so parameter changes can be recorded into your sequencer in real-time.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/themodularsynth.shtml

1057 x0xb0x Build Manual - Parts list
XoXBOX
http://www.ladyada.net/make/x0xb0x/fab/parts.html

1033 "I'm a technical lead on the Google+ team. Ask me anything."
I helped design and build a lot of the circles model and sharing UI for Google+. I was recruited to Google to work on "getting social right" in early 2010. Prior to that, I was CTO of Plaxo, and also its first employee (since March 2002). I've also spent many years working on open standards for the social web (OpenID, OAuth, Portable Contacts, WebFinger, etc.) Since I work for a big/public company (albeit a pretty cool one), I can't provide specific stats, dates for future features, or details of confidential code/algorithms. But I will do my best to be "refreshingly frank" about everything else. :)
http://anyasq.com/79-im-a-technical-lead-on-the-google+-team%20%20%20%20--

987 Alesis Micron
This is one of the cutest, smallest, yet most powerful synths I've ever put my hands on! The Micron is the sequel to the popular Ion, and while it can be considered as the Ion's younger brother, it actually has a few enhancements that are absent on the big bro. This is a very clean, precise, sparkly and definitely virtual analog (or analog modeled) sounding synth. Eight voices of polyphony are plenty for these types of units, but we would always want more. The synth engine is the same as the Ion though, but extra and welcome features include sequencing, arpeggio, and great on board percussion, and the ability to build patterns. The Micron really sounds bigger than it looks: while personally I feel that the character of its synth engine leans on the more digitally precise DSP side of virtual analog technology, it's certainly capable of huge, warm and fat sounds. The main panel is logically laid out and easy to understand. At the very left, a big red knob offers volume control; the two "m1" and "m2" sliders provide useful modulation control, typically (but not always) vibrato and filter cutoff. The three knobs labeled "x", "y" and "z" also offer way of modulating sounds, and can (ought to) be assigned to your favorite parameters. Two octave buttons, and other useful commands such as tap (tempo) and latch (sustains the notes) occupy the space at the left of the two-line backlit green display. Finally, a multi-function matrix with push-down knob serve as the central nerve system of the machine, letting you easily access programs, setups, configurations, patterns and rhythms. You do the programming by turning the knob to view the various editing pages. In all, it's simple to program, and the manual does a fantastic job of being easy to follow and easy to understand.
http://www.synthmania.com/micron.htm

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.
http://jhaible.de/polykorg/jh_polykorg_clone.html

872 Boomkat - Your independent music specialist
Boomkat - A specialist music website selling VINYLs, CDs, DVDs and DIGITAL DOWNLOADS, brought to you by a dedicated team who have been operating in this field for 10 years - building up a huge resource of information and opinion about music that exists beyond the radar... Our product extends to cover the most underground forms of Electronic music, Hip Hop, Post-Folk, Alt.Country, IDM, Electro, Acoustica, Post-Rock, Ambient, Micro House, Detroit Techno, Mentalism, Electropop, Indiepop, Grime, Free Jazz, Modern Composition, Cologne Techno, Future Disco, Drone, Sublow, Soundtracks, Noise and out and out post-generic objects of wonder. Electronic Music, Electronica, IDM, Warp, Autechre, Aphex Twin, Boards Of Canada, Arovane, Bola, Experimental, Dance, Dance Music, Records, Vinyl, Skam, CCO, Morr Music, Kid 606, Isan, City Centre Offices, Pole, Matmos, Anticon, Mush, Schematic, Drexciya, Hip Hop, Mille Plateaux, VVM, Ryoji Ikeda, Fennesz, Mego, Raster Noton, Rephlex, Squarepusher, Skanfrom, Marumari, Force Inc, Stereolab, Herbert, Geiom, Neo Ouija, Tzadik, Team Doyobi, Black Dog, Ulrich Schnauss, Opiate, Bjork, Thrill Jockey, Scape, Gonzales, Benge, Toytronic, Gimmik, Abfahrt Hinwil, Kompakt, Berlin, Tigerbeat 6, Cex, Twerk, Neuton, Maurizio, Tikiman, Prefuse 73, Akufen, Cologne, A-Musik, Boomkat, Boomcat
http://boomkat.com/

846 100 Principles for Designing Logos and Building Brands | Brand Identity Essentials

http://brand-identity-essentials.com/100-principles/

794 TouellSkouarn Gallery
TouellSkouarn is a boutique pedal & stompboxes builder with breton serigraphy and/or etching, vintage and NOS components, based near Brest - France. pedal, fuzz, vintage, NOS, fuzzes, tube, preamp, breton
http://www.touellskouarn.fr/skeudennou-gallery-gallerie

761 Midi Software - Synth Zone
MIDI Sequencing SoftwareAnvil Studio Anvil Studio is a MIDI and audio sequencer and is free software for Windows users. Building Blocks Building Blocks for Windows is a multifunctional MIDI application / modular sequencer, that allows you to build custom controller remapping, LFO's, arpeggiators, autochords, drum and note sequences, echoes etc. Busker A Windows score editor and player that has Yamaha style support. 1000s of Yamaha styles can be downloaded for free. Another great music software tool from Jos Maas. Cakewalk Sonar Windows & Mac sequencer now with integrated midi and audio. Sonar demo available. For other Cakewalk resources see Synth Zone's Cakewalk Page Cubase - Steinberg Featuring integrated midi & audio package Cubase VST For more info & related links see Synth Zone's Cubase Links Cursed Sequencer Open Source sequencer for Windows and Linux. Digital Performer MOTU presents Digital Performer for the Mac, a complete digital audio and MIDI production environment. Competitive upgrades available. See the new Digital Performer mailing list. Ditty Ditty is a freeware MIDI sequencer for Windows aimed at assisting piano practice. Easybeat Mac MIDI sequencing software from Uni Software Plus. Features include a software GM wavetable synth. Energy XT Energy XT is Windows sequencer/composer software. Fl Studio Windows application that provides easy to use yet powerful MIDI/digital audio sequencing and looping tools. Intuem Mac OSX MIDI sequencer that provides a variable-tempo system and a simple way to transform a real, human, performance into a sequence where bars and beats actually have meaning. Time restricted version available to download. Jammer - Soundtrek Jammer for Windows provides a 256 Track MIDI sequencer with built in studio musicians. A very useful program for creating arrangements & drum tracks with assistance from the software. Also check the Yahoo Jammer Group. JUMP A highly streamlined Windows MIDI sequencer, designed to help you compose music Jazzware - Jazz++ Windows & Linux open source MIDI sequencer with audio support. If you need a MIDI sequencer you really should check it out. Logic Pro Audio Apple's MIDI & audio solution for the Mac. For Emagic product support see the Emagic Legacy pages at Apple. For related information see Emagic Users Page with resources & mailing list for Emagic products, the Logic Users' Net which includes Mac related info, and the Powerkeys "Learning Logic" web site. SwiftKick provides and archive for the Logic Users' Group environments. Editors, MIDI processors etc. are available. Omega Art has Logic info and resources. You can read the History Of Logic at Tweakheadz Lab. Magix Magix Music Studio incorporates a MIDI sequencer with its digital audio sequencer. Massiva An audio/MIDI sequencer for Windows users with undo plus plugin support. This is just an archive of an old site. You can still get it from AudioMelody.com. Massiva has now moved on to become Energy XT Mixcraft Windows software that supports MIDI and audio sequencing.. MU.LAB An alternative, hi-quality music application for Mac OSX and Windows with MIDI and audio support. MultitrackStudio Window digital audio recorder with VST 2.0 plugin and MIDI support. Freeware version and pro versions available. Music Master Win sequencing & notation package with a full graphic interface for Roland VS880 control & integration. Music Master Works A shareware Windows sequencing & accompaniment package. Win95 & Win3.1 versions available. From Aspire software MusicPhrase XL MusicPhrase for Windows is a creative tool for composing music. Features phrase sequencing and visual groove editing tools. Music Studio Producer Music Studio Producer is a free Windows MIDI sequencer, DAW which can host VST(i), supports ASIO. From Aspire software Numerology Numerology is a modular sequencing and audio plugin environment for Mac OS X. Onyx Onyx by Jasmine Music provides powerful sequencing, harmonizer and MIDI-2-Audio rendering. Power Chords By Howling Dog Systems - Innovative Windows midi sequencer using onscreen guitar fretboard interface, plus other unique features for creating strum & rhythm patterns. Demo available PowerTracks Pro Audio PG Music's budget priced sequencer for Windows now features up to 48 tracks of digital audio with effects, EQ, panning etc plus 3rd party plugin support. Pro Tools Digidesign provide Pro Tools for Windows and Mac with MIDI, multitrack audio and plugin support. Quartz Audio Master Quartz Audio Master is free Windows multitrack digital recording software and MIDI sequencing software. Provided by DigitalSound Planet Reaper REAPER is a fully featured Windows multitrack audio and MIDI recording, editing, processing, mixing, and mastering environment. Fully functional evaluation available for download. Rosegarden Rosegarden is a free MIDI sequencer and notation editor for Unix, and has binary distributions for Linux PCs and SGI IRIX. SoftStep SoftStep is a Win9x modular step sequencer based on modular analog step sequencers. Features modules, which are math and logic functions that you treat as physical boxes with knobs and sliders. Style Enhancer Windows MIDI sequencer based on Performance Modeling technology with powerful and intelligent MIDI-data generation and transformation. SwarShala Midi sequencer package for Windows software that covers both the melodic and rhythmic aspects of Indian music. Featured instruments include Sitar, Sarod, Tanpura, Guitar, Tabla, Pakhawaj, Dholki and Bells. MIDI files and WAV files can be output. Sweet Sixteen Midi sequencer package for Windows from Roni Music. And check out the Sweet MIDI arpeggiator for Windows, very cool !! TR-x0x Freeware Windows step sequencer based on the Roland TR-808/909 drum machines. Tracktion Tracktion from Mackie provides low cost MIDI and audio sequencing. Tunafish A Windows VSTi MIDI sequencer with sample support. A fully functional ( save disabled ) demo is available to download. Has sample support and provides a built-in sample/drum sequencer. Xx A multi-track MIDI sequencer for MacOS. It is also an algorithmic compositional tool. Requires OMS. Midi SoftwareAudible Oddities - Twerk's Tools Audible Oddities is an audio mastering business and Shawn Hatfield also provides some free music composition tools for the Mac featuring sequencing control and algorithmic music generation. Burnt Toast even has a beta version available for Win XP. Catanya Software pattern arpeggiator VST plugin. MIDI-OX Win9x/NT midi utility providing sysex handling, diagnostics, filtering & mapping of midi data Streams. All Windows MIDI users should check this out. It is also available from Yamaha UK. Also see MIDI Yoke which allows you to route MIDI between different applications. vanBasco's Karaoke Player vanBasco's Karaoke Player is freeware Windows software that plays Karaoke (.kar) and standard MIDI (.mid, .midi, .rmi) files. Provides a piano keyboard and lyric display. Vocal Writer Shareware music & vocal synthesis software for the Power Mac. Not only playback & edit GM midi files, but it will also sing your lyrics (85 voices to choose from) Zel Zel is an interpretive MIDI programming language for Windows. Version 1.2 includes the Zel Drum Machine, a style based composer and editor which makes it easy to create MIDI drum tracks without having to learn the Zel language. Freeware. Midi Sequencing Related SitesAtari-MIDI Yahoo Group for Atari computer users to discuss MIDI applications. Also check The Caged Artist Series Page for once commercial MIDI software that is now freeware. Audio Forums Forums for most major sequencing & digital audio software packages. Harmony Central Provide an archive of MIDI sequencer and notation applications to download. There is software for all platforms available. HitSquad Provide links to a number of MIDI sequencers and "tracker" sequencers for Windows, Mac and Linux. MacMusic.org Macmusic.org have lots of links to Mac specific audio and MIDI sequencing resources. . Mac OSX MIDI Apps A very useful list of links to Mac OSX MIDI applications with descriptions and direct links to the websites and apps. Midijoys Freeware Windows program that combines two independent fully programmable joystick controllers, and a Continuous MIDI Controller programmable sliders that can send a wide spectrum of MIDI control parameters. MidiPlugins.com Links to freeware and commercial MIDI plugins for both Windows and Mac OS9/OSX. Music-X Amiga University Info on the original Amiga sequencer Music-X including writing sysex protocols. Also see Driptomatic Fairytales for Music-X info and resources. AM/FM also provide disk images containing many Amiga MIDI articles and tools. Sonic Control Sonic Control provides information and reviews of sequencers for all platforms as well as MIDI hardware. SourceForge SourceForge provide freeware software for Windows, Mac and Linux platforms and have many MIDI sequencer applications. Sweetwater Sequencer Forum Sweetwater.com provides forums including one dedicated to MIDI sequencers. Vintage Sequencers Tweakheadz Lab provides a great rundown on the ancestors of todays sequencers on computers in the 80s. Very interesting and informative reading with screen shots of many sequencers from the early days of MIDI.
http://www.synthzone.com/midiseq.htm

755 Lotus Notes/Domino 7 application performance: Part 2: Optimizing database views
In part two of this article series, we explain how you can build views that are optimized for performance in your Notes/Domino applications. lotus notes, lotus domino, view performance, application performance, view indexing, reader names field, dddlsca
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/lotus/library/notes7-application-performance2/

720 Common Security Mistakes in Web Applications - Smashing Magazine
Web application developers today need to be skilled in a multitude of disciplines. It’s necessary to build an application that is user friendly, highly performant, accessible and secure, all while executing partially in an untrusted environment that you, the developer, have no control over. I speak, of course, about the User Agent. Most commonly seen in the form of a web browser, but in reality, one never really knows what’s on the other end of the HTTP connection. There are many things to worry about when it comes to security on the Web. Is your site protected against denial of service attacks? Is your user data safe? Can your users be tricked into doing things they would not normally do? Is it possible for an attacker to pollute your database with fake data? Is it possible for an attacker to gain unauthorized access to restricted parts of your site? Unfortunately, unless we’re careful with the code we write, the answer to these questions can often be one we’d rather not hear. We’ll skip over denial of service attacks in this article, but take a close look at the other issues. To be more conformant with standard terminology, we’ll talk about Cross-Site Scripting (XSS), Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF), Phishing, Shell injection and SQL injection. We’ll also assume PHP as the language of development, but the problems apply regardless of language, and solutions will be similar in other languages.
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/10/18/common-security-mistakes-in-web-applications/

714 30 free programming eBooks « citizen428.blog()
Since this post got quite popular I decided to incorporate some of the excellent suggestions posted in the comments, so this list now has more than 40 books in it. [UPDATED: 2010-10-12] Learning a new programming language always is fun and there are many great books legally available for free online. Here’s a selection of 30 of them: Lisp/Scheme: How to Desing Programs Interpreting Lisp (PDF, suggested by Gary Knott) Let Over Lambda On Lisp Practical Common Lisp Programming in Emacs Lisp Programming Languages. Application and Interpretation (suggested by Alex Ott) Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days Visual LISP Developer’s Bible (suggested by “skatterbrainz”) Ruby: Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Design Patterns in Ruby Learn to Program MacRuby: The Definitive Guide Mr. Neighborly’s Humble Little Ruby Book (suggested by @tundal45) Programming Ruby Read Ruby 1.9 Ruby Best Practices Ruby on Rails Tutorial Book (suggested by @tundal45) Javascript: Building iPhone Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Eloquent Javascript jQuery Fundamentals Mastering Node Haskell: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good Real World Haskell Erlang: Concurrent Programming in Erlang Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good Python: Dive into Python How to Think Like a Computer Scientist – Learning with Python Smalltalk: Dynamic Web Development with Seaside Pharo by Example (based on the next book in this list, suggested by Anonymous) Squeak by Example Misc: Algorithms The Art of Assembly Language Beginning Perl Building Accessible Websites (suggested by Joe Clark) The C Book C# Yellow Book (suggested by Joe Wyatt) Compiler Construction Dive Into HTML 5 (suggested by @til) Higher-Order Perl The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages (suggested by “Def”) An Introduction to R Learn Prolog Now! Objective-C 2.0 Essentials Programming Scala Of course there are many more free programming eBooks, but this list consists of the ones I read or want(ed) to read. This is far from comprehensive and languages that are completely missing are mostly left out on purpose (e.g. PHP, C++, Java). I’m sure somebody else made a list for them somewhere.
http://citizen428.net/archives/434

691 visualizing.org
Visualizing.org is a community of creative people working to make sense of complex issues through data and design… and it’s a shared space and free resource to help you achieve this goal. Why Visualizing.org? By some estimates, we now create more data each year than in the entirety of prior human history. Data visualization helps us approach, interpret, and extract knowledge from this information. Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen government agencies, NGOs, and companies open up their data for the public to see and use. And we’ve seen data visualization figure more prominently in design curricula, conference programs, and the media. We created Visualizing.org because we want to help connect the proliferation of public data… with a community that can help us understand this data… with the general public. What is Visualizing.org? What can I do on the site? For designers: Visualizing is a place to showcase your work, get feedback, ensure that your work is seen by lots of people and gets used by teachers, journalists, and conference organizers to help educate the public about various world issues Visualizing is a free resource to search for data Use Visualizing to keep up with and be inspired by the latest work from other designers and design schools Learn about new visualization tools, blogs, books and other resources to help your work Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike License For teachers and schools: Visualizing is a place to exhibit the collective work of your students, organize assignments and class projects, and help your students find data for their own visualizations We’re working on new tools to help you share teaching material with other teachers As an Academic Partner, your students are eligible to participate in various design competitions – we’re hosting the first Visualizing Marathon in New York in October To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For bloggers and journalists: Visualizing is a resource to find data visualizations about a wide variety of world issues to inform and accompany your own reporting – and it’s easy to embed visualizations and widgets from Visualizing on your own site For conference organizers: As a Knowledge Partner, Visualizing allows you to use data visualizations at your conferences under a Creative Commons License To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For all: Visualizing is a new and fun online resource to learn more about the world in all its complexity and inter-dependence -- and become more comfortable with data and how it can be visually represented How does it work? The site is open and free to use. Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. Simply put, this means that anyone can share, copy, remix, or build upon the visualization as long as: (i) it is used non-commercially; and (ii) the visualization’s creator and source are credited.
http://www.visualizing.org/

647 Brady Cases – Custom Made Road Cases, Guitar Cases, Pedalboards, and More
Brady Cases builds the best custom guitar cases, merchandise cases, and road cases. Protect your instruments, amps, pedals, and gear with a Brady Case. Guitar Cases,Road Cases,ATA Cases,Instrument Cases,Keyword Cases,AMP Cases,Merchandise Cases,Custom Cases,Band Gear Cases,Pedalboard Cases
http://www.bradycases.com/

628 Get LoFi Circuit Bending Blog: January 2006
Circuit bending, synth building, Circuit bending projects, links, and pictures Circuit Bent, Synth DIY, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent, Circuit Bent,Circuit Bent Cedar Rapids, Casio SK-1, Casio, Yamaha, Speak and Spell, Casio SK-1, Casio, Yamaha, Speak and Spell, Casio SK-1, Casio, Yamaha, Speak and Spell, Casio SK-1, Casio, Yamaha, Speak and Spell, Casio SK-1, Casio, Yamaha, Speak and Spell, Casio SK-1, Casio, Yamaha, Speak and Spell, Casio SK-1, Casio, Yamaha, Speak and Spell, Casio SK-1, Casio, Yamaha, Speak and Spell, Rap machine, casio mods, casio hacks, circuit bent schematics, pictures, free music, theremin, kaoss pad, super speak and spell, bentstruments, bentfest 2005, circuit bent nanoloop, nanoloop music, optical theremin, theremin, vtech, talking scholar, sonar, synth, making a synth
http://www.getlofi.com/2006_01_01_archive.html

616 Alphabet Soup modular synth
The STS Serge Modular can be a daunting system at first blush, especially for those who come from an "East Coast" modular synth background. My first synthesizers were Moog analogs and my first Analog Modular Synth was an Arrick "Dotcom" system - so I started out with East Coast paradigms that I had to "unlearn" in order to use my Serge Modular to the fullest. For those of you coming from a similar background or those just discovering the Serge Modular for the first time, these "Alphabet Soup" pages are dedicated to you! The Serge Modular is intuitive and fun to use - especially when you realize the main difference between a Serge Modular and most others has to do with the size of the building blocks, where a Moog or similar modular will have monolithic building blocks like ADSRs and Oscillators, the Serge can be more "low-level" in that you can build ADSRs and oscillators from Serge modules or, more properly, Function Blocks. These Function Blocks usually come bearing arcane names that have been shortened to an "Alphabet Soup" conglomeration of acronyms. In this series of articles, I'll be talking about some of the ways to approach these Function Blocks to create much more useful, surprising, complex or just simply fun synthesis features. The first function block we're going to look at is the "DSG", otherwise known as the Dual Universal Slope Generator. This mild-mannered module is in some ways the most powerful one in the entire Serge catalog because it can become so many different things depending on where you place the patch cords...as you'll soon see.
http://www.carbon111.com/alphabet1.html

497 Malekko Heavy Industry «» Euro Rack Synth Modules
We design and build high-quality guitar and effects pedals and synthesizer modules.
http://malekkoheavyindustry.com/index.php/all-synth-modules

488 gridr buildrrr
A tool to plan your web grid -- with the best name ever. web design, grid, web development
http://gridr.atomeye.com/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

466 Musicians – This Is How You Create A Great Looking Facebook Page
Like most of you, I too LIKE Facebook, and ever since my last TechCrunch post (How to Build Engaging One-of-Kind Facebook Fan Pages), I've been exploring and trying to find new ways to improve the creation process of a Page. This time, I'd like to focus on a how-to for the musicians among you.
http://techcrunch.com/2010/06/27/facebook-musicians-page/

423 MACBETH STUDIO SYSTEMS
Welcome to MacBeth Synthesizers! LATEST NEWS: 20/07/09 please scroll down for infoOver the last year and half or so, more products have been developed. Work has gone into the design of a new modular synthesizer system shared by two formats- the 3U format and the 5U format. The designs are relatively new but still retain the inherant qualities of the M3X, M5 and M5N synthesizers. The system is called the X-Series Modular Synthesizer after the popular M3X and its protégé keyboard synthesizer the X-Factor. This fully analogue keyboard is still under serious development and there will be more information to follow on that one. As a refreshing change from making the large scale semi modular M5 and M5N, I am now delving into the production of smaller, free for all systems that will probably grow large! I'm taking into it all my experience of designing both large and small analogue synthesizers as well as a few new ideas too. Please take the time to look around this website. In each catagory there is product information, sounds, tracks and links to other related media on the internet. Currently the 3U X-Series Dual Oscillator and 'Backend' Filter Combo are in production. I expect delivery of the Dual Oscillator within the next two weeks- shortly after that the 'Backend' Filter Combo will roll out of production. Please contact any of the Distributers listed to get your modules. I intend to produce a short run of the 5U modules soon, so once again- stay tuned for that... ...anyway! I have uploaded quite a few demo sounds on here- maybe not to everyones taste- but at least they make you think of what these modules could do in the right hands, i.e. you! - after all- I'm an engineer, not a muscian as such!...Well you decide! All MacBeth Products are built to exacting standards- from materials selection to the physical build. The PCBs and Sheet Metalwork are fabricated by Zot Engineering from Musselburgh, Scotland http://www.zot.co.uk and final assembly is performed by Diatron Assembly Systems from Norwich, England http://www.diatron.co.uk Both companies also manufacture equipment for the medical, military and aerospace sectors of industrial engineering
http://www.macbethstudiosystems.com/

418 RAISERROR (Transact-SQL)
Generates an error message and initiates error processing for the session. RAISERROR can either reference a user-defined message stored in the sys.messages catalog view or build a message dynamically. The message is returned as a server error message to the calling application or to an associated CATCH block of a TRY…CATCH construct.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178592(v=SQL.100).aspx

416 Welcome to the Modular Corner
Welcome to the Modular Corner! This site is intended as a resource for all users of the Pulsar / Scope Modular synth, a software synthesizer which comes with the Scope range of soundcards from Sonic Core (formerly Creamware). Here you will find information about the Modular Synth, it's various components, the many patches that are available for the Synth along with other related documents and links to do with all things Modular. On the Patches page, you will find information about individual patches that have been created for the Modular. This aims to be a complete listing of all the Modular patches that have become available, with a brief description of the patch. Where possible this will include a more detailed description, mp3 examples, signal flow diagrams, etc, in order to build up a more comprehensive 'manual' for the many patches that are available. The downloads page has other related resources, such as freeware modules, documents on modular synthesis, etc. Your contributions are vital - If you made a patch that you're proud of, or if you've downloaded someone else's that you like - let me know. I can't write up every patch on my own.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/index.html

405 AudioLemon: HOWTO: Build A Steampunk Oscilloscope
AudioLemon is a blog that looks at all things audio related. Synths, samplers, software, effects and a little bit of electronic music and culture. A steampunk oscilloscope built by Andrew Smith from parts found in a junk box. "Although not intended to be fully functional it does actually work." It's looks so cute... if you have the DIY skills you can read an article over on electronicsweekly detailing the build, components used and a schematic. "I discovered that I had a really cute little 7cm CRT in the loft, together with several other valves of different types, and it seemed a good idea to make something decorative with them. For me, a lot of the charm of this piece resides in the unconventional layout and design, using a polished wooden box instead of the more usual metal chassis."
http://audiolemon.blogspot.com/2007/10/howto-build-steampunk-oscilloscope.html

370 Welcome, WebM <video>
In February 2007, 1177 days ago to be exact, Opera proposed the <video> element and we published a manifesto for video on the Web. When proposing <video>, we knew there would be two challenges. The first was easy: to get consensus around the syntax. We wanted <video> to be as easy to use as <img>. The second was harder: to find an open and freely-usable high quality video format. The web has always been open and freely-usable; Tim didn’t patent HTML, I didn’t patent CSS and Brendan didn’t patent JavaScript. The big news today is that WebM will join the list of open and freely usable Web formats, and video will finally become a first-class citizen of the Web. This is a big deal, and the day will be remembered in the history of the Web. At Opera, we’re proud to add support for WebM into a Labs build — you can download this build for:
http://labs.opera.com/news/2010/05/19/

300 YAMAHA CS-30 SYNTHESIZER
This page is dedicated to the Yamaha CS-30, the monophonic top-of-the-line of Yamahas CS-series synthesizers. This synthesizer series comprised of the CS-5, CS-10, CS-15 and the CS-30. These were all monophonic. The polyphonic series comprised of the CS-50, CS-60 and the classic CS-80, Later came the CS-30M and CS-40 monophonics as well as the CS-70 polyphonic with some patch saving capabilities and different design. All the units of this series of vintage synthesizers are very nice and collectable, but the CS-30 was the largest and most flexible of the monophonic series. If Yamaha had ever decided to build a large modular system they could have done so using some of the designs of the CS-series. In this page I will go through the features of the CS-30, for anyone interested.
http://212.242.106.33/~etcetera/public/instruments/CS-30/cs30page.htm

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/01/alesis-andromeda-aurora.html

213 All Design Patterns | Open Source Design Pattern Library
Fluid is an open-source software community Fluid builds user interfaces, designs commonly used interactions, teaches others how to build good user-centred designs, and works with other software projects to integrate our solutions into their applications.
http://uidesignpatterns.org/designPatterns/

101 - 201