100SILEX, de 0 100 s: classic
1517 THE MUTANT MACHINE Dynamic Analog Percussion Engine
MICROCONTROLLER FREE ANALOG PERCUSSION SYNTHESIS unique Inverter Core oscillators form the MEMBRANE. Each analog oscillator has three waveforms to select from capable of synthesizing everything from heavy-hitting bassdrums to classic 909-style snares and other complex timbres modular design gives the Machine many auxiliary purposes, great for modular sound design of many varieties, and not just percussion the SNAPPY section is comprised of a voltage controlled noise oscillator, for modelling the noisy part of drum timbres both MEMBRANE and SNAPPY elements have an external input for replacing the built-in sound sources, opening up many avenues of possibility 13 control voltage and audio inputs, for a fully modular drum experience 7 audio and CV/gate outputs for maximum integration with other modules dedicated outputs for each WAVE and NOISE oscillator mean you can use the Machine as a complex VCO in your system, when not synthesizing percussion WAVEFORM SCANNING FEATURE GENERATES COMPLEX TIMBRES the MEMBRANE’s waveforms can be scanned through automatically by the wavescanner’s voltage controlled clock generator, or an external clock or VCO can be used SCAN FREQ CV forms a unique form of timbre control, making the Machine act like a complex oscillator at its WAVES output the ENABLE input allows you to gate the wavescanner on and off with a CV or gate signal ARCHITECTURE OF THE MACHINE The Mutant Machine is a dynamic analog instrument capable of generating a wide palette of sounds, ranging from various forms of analog percussion to complex drones and oscillations. To achieve this, the Machine features two synthesis sections which are summed together at the final output: MEMBRANE and SNAPPY. Like the other Mutant Drums, the MEMBRANE and SNAPPY circuits began their mutation as classic analog percussion techniques and have been reimagined for 21st century modular synthesis. The MEMBRANE forms the main body of the sound by way of two analog VCOs, and the SNAPPY section further adds to the timbre by contributing noisy elements to the mix. A noisy CLICK which occurs at the beginning of the SNAPPY sound can have its volume adjusted independent of the main decaying SNAPPY texture. The waveforms which make up the MEMBRANE can be selected manually by button press, or the WAVESCANNER can be used to automatically scan through the available analog waveforms. By modulating the frequency through which waves are scanned, unique, complex sounds are created. Experimentation is encouraged by the many modulation inputs and outputs available to you. The Machine features 8 CV and gate inputs for modulation as well as two external audio inputs, for bringing other modules into the Machine’s core. There are many audio outputs for maximum versatility, allowing you to use the Machine to create drones and alien timbres for use elsewhere in the modular analog system.
http://www.hexinverter.net/mutant-machine

1454 Old Europa Cafe: ELECTRIC SEWER AGE [COIL] - Bad White Corpuscle (OLD EUROPA CAFE)
ELECTRIC SEWER AGE [COIL], Bad White Corpuscle, OLD EUROPA CAFE ,music, label, mailorder, industrial, neo folk, dark ambient, neo pop, neo classic, martial, noise, minimal, ambient, ebm, traditional, neo cabaret, military pop, combat folk, power electronics, etheral, heavenly voices, apocalyptic folk, black ambient
http://www.oldeuropacafe.com/main.php?nav=pd&prdct=12564

1241 Additional information on Canon 420EZ AF-Speedlite

http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/eos/EOS-1n/Flash/Canon_420EZ/index.htm

1007 Advanced Programming Techniques for Modular Synthesizers / Nord Modular
1 Introduction 1.1 The Purpose of this Document 1.2 Acknowledgements 2 Oscillator Waveform Modification 2.1 Sync 2.2 Frequency Modulation Techniques 2.3 Wave Shaping 2.4 Vector Synthesis 2.5 Wave Sequencing 2.6 Audio-Rate Crossfading 2.7 Wave Terrain Synthesis 2.8 VOSIM 2.9 FOF Synthesis 2.10 Granular Synthesis 3 Filter Techniques 3.1 Resonant Filters as Oscillators 3.2 Serial and Parallel Filter Techniques 3.3 Audio-Rate Filter Cutoff Modulation 3.4 Adding Analog Feel 3.5 Wet Filters 4 Noise Generation 4.1 White Noise 4.2 Brown Noise 4.3 Pink Noise 4.4 Pitched Noise 5 Percussion 5.1 Bass Drum Synthesis 5.2 Snare Drum Synthesis 5.3 Synthesis of Gongs, Bells and Cymbals 5.4 Synthesis of Hand Claps 6 Additive Synthesis 6.1 What is Additive Synthesis? 6.2 Resynthesis 6.3 Group Additive Synthesis 6.4 Morphing 6.5 Transients 6.7 Which Oscillator to Use 7 Physical Modeling 7.1 Introduction to Physical Modeling 7.2 The Karplus-Strong Algorithm 7.3 Tuning of Delay Lines 7.4 Delay Line Details 7.5 Physical Modeling with Digital Waveguides 7.6 String Modeling 7.7 Woodwind Modeling 7.8 Related Links 8 Speech Synthesis and Processing 8.1 Vocoder Techniques 8.2 Speech Synthesis 8.3 Pitch Tracking 9 Using the Logic Modules 9.1 Complex Logic Functions 9.2 Flipflops, Counters other Sequential Elements 9.3 Asynchronous Elements 9.4 Arpeggiation 10 Algorithmic Composition 10.1 Chaos and Fractal Music 10.2 Cellular Automata 10.3 Cooking Noodles 11 Reverb and Echo Effects 11.1 Synthetic Echo and Reverb 11.2 Short-Time Reverb 11.3 Low-Fidelity Echo and Reverb 12 Distortion Effects 12.1 Distortion using Nonlinearities 12.2 Multiband Distortion 12.3 Polynomial Distortion 12.4 Distortion using Time-Variant Systems 13 Frequency and Pitch Shifting 13.1 Frequency Shifting 13.2 Pitch Shifting 14 Spatialization 15 Emulating Classic Synths 15.1 General Guidelines 15.2 Yamaha DX7 15.3 Octave Cat 15.4 ARP Odyssey 15.5 Casio 15.6 Hallsey Mark 1 and 2 15.7 Other Emulations
http://www.cim.mcgill.ca/~clark/nordmodularbook/nm_book_toc.html

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.
http://jhaible.de/polykorg/jh_polykorg_clone.html

759 C-DOS Abandonware Games
Classic abandonware DOS games! Downloads including games, reviews, manuals, walkthroughs, screenshots & extras. Dosbox support! DOS Games, Games, Abandonware, Abandon, Old, Warez, Old Dos Games, dos, dos games, abandonware, abandon
http://www.cdosabandonware.com/std_search.php?search=duke

545 The Wire: Adventures in Modern Music: Article
The Wire is a magazine about modern music - improvisation, electronics, avant rock The Wire, Adventures, Modern, Music, Rock, Classical, Electronic, Improvisation, Jazz, Folk, Magazine, Writing, Eclectic
http://www.thewire.co.uk/articles/mp3_specials/

543 Music Thing
The essential, funny guide to retro and future synths, guitars, music making, gear, gadgets and techology. retro, VST, synth, synthesizer, synthesiser, computers, vintage, classic, guitar, effects, pedals, moog, roland, korg, fender, gibson, akai
http://musicthing.blogspot.com/

533 The Theory and Technique of Electronic Music
Contents Sinusoids, amplitude and frequency Measures of Amplitude Units of Amplitude Controlling Amplitude Frequency Synthesizing a sinusoid Superposing Signals Periodic Signals About the Software Examples Examples Wavetables and samplers The Wavetable Oscillator Sampling Enveloping samplers Timbre stretching Interpolation Examples Audio and control computations The sampling theorem Control Control streams Converting from audio signals to numeric control streams Control streams in block diagrams Event detection Audio signals as control Operations on control streams Control operations in Pd Examples Automation and voice management Envelope Generators Linear and Curved Amplitude Shapes Continuous and discontinuous control changes Muting Switch-and-ramp Polyphony Voice allocation Voice tags Encapsulation in Pd Examples Modulation Taxonomy of spectra Multiplying audio signals Waveshaping Frequency and phase modulation Examples Designer spectra Carrier/modulator model Pulse trains Pulse trains via waveshaping Pulse trains via wavetable stretching Resulting spectra Movable ring modulation Phase-aligned formant (PAF) generator Examples Time shifts and delays Complex numbers Complex sinusoids Time shifts and phase changes Delay networks Recirculating delay networks Power conservation and complex delay networks Artificial reverberation Controlling reverberators Variable and fractional shifts Fidelity of interpolating delay lines Pitch shifting Examples Filters Taxonomy of filters Low-pass and high-pass filters Band-pass and stop-band filters Equalizing filters Elementary filters Elementary non-recirculating filter Non-recirculating filter, second form Elementary recirculating filter Compound filters Real outputs from complex filters Two recirculating filters for the price of one Designing filters One-pole low-pass filter One-pole, one-zero high-pass filter Shelving filter Band-pass filter Peaking and stop-band filter Butterworth filters Stretching the unit circle with rational functions Butterworth band-pass filter Time-varying coefficients Impulse responses of recirculating filters All-pass filters Applications Subtractive synthesis Envelope following Single Sideband Modulation Examples Fourier analysis and resynthesis Fourier analysis of periodic signals Periodicity of the Fourier transform Fourier transform as additive synthesis Properties of Fourier transforms Fourier transform of DC Shifts and phase changes Fourier transform of a sinusoid Fourier analysis of non-periodic signals Fourier analysis and reconstruction of audio signals Narrow-band companding Timbre stamping (classical vocoder) Phase Phase relationships between channels Phase bashing Examples Classical waveforms Symmetries and Fourier series Sawtooth waves and symmetry Dissecting classical waveforms Fourier series of the elementary waveforms Sawtooth wave Parabolic wave Square and symmetric triangle waves General (non-symmetric) triangle wave Predicting and controlling foldover Over-sampling Sneaky triangle waves Transition splicing Examples Index Bibliography
http://crca.ucsd.edu/~msp/techniques/latest/book-html/book.html

385 oliverbass on Virb
Classic Rock / Experimental / Ambient Alsace
http://virb.com/oliverbass

347 Pixelh8 - Multidisciplinary Artist and Techno Anthropologist » Software
The Pixelh8 Music Tech Master Stroke DS is a real time synthesizer for the Nintendo DS system it allows for extensive sound design and is the natural evolution of the Music Tech Series allowing for the classic chip tune sound on a modern device. The new system allows for keyboard style play by pressing “X” to bring up the 2 Ocatve Xylophone or classic Music Tech mode by using the directional pad to control the sounds in the same way as the Music Tech Game Boy and Pro Performer Game Boy Advance. Loads of new combinations are possible as you can now combine interval settings with time based effects as well as using the noise channel instead of tone and the easy change between menus allow for quick change during performance. All sounds are produced via the on board sound chip and no samples or sample manipulation is used, this is a real time chip tune synth for the DS.
http://pixelh8.co.uk/software/

315 exp etc
An Anthology Of Noise & Electronic Music Marcadores: Anthology of Noise and Electronic Music, • avantgarde, • classical, • electronica, • experimental, • noise
http://experimentaletc.blogspot.com/2010/05/anthology-of-noise-electronic-music.html

300 YAMAHA CS-30 SYNTHESIZER
This page is dedicated to the Yamaha CS-30, the monophonic top-of-the-line of Yamahas CS-series synthesizers. This synthesizer series comprised of the CS-5, CS-10, CS-15 and the CS-30. These were all monophonic. The polyphonic series comprised of the CS-50, CS-60 and the classic CS-80, Later came the CS-30M and CS-40 monophonics as well as the CS-70 polyphonic with some patch saving capabilities and different design. All the units of this series of vintage synthesizers are very nice and collectable, but the CS-30 was the largest and most flexible of the monophonic series. If Yamaha had ever decided to build a large modular system they could have done so using some of the designs of the CS-series. In this page I will go through the features of the CS-30, for anyone interested.
http://212.242.106.33/~etcetera/public/instruments/CS-30/cs30page.htm

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/01/alesis-andromeda-aurora.html

176 Retro Thing
The independent guide to vintage gadgets and retro technology. retro, vintage, technology, hi-fi, photography, video games, home computers, film, movie cameras, watches, classic cars, robots, sixties, seventies, eighties, space, turntables, super 8, design
http://www.retrothing.com/

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