100SILEX, de 0 100 s: comments
1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1381 COLLIN CUNNINGHAM / NARBOTIC INSTRUMENTS
COLLIN CUNNINGHAM / NARBOTIC INSTRUMENTS [BLOG] MidiVox CV sketch update 02.05.2012 The MidiVox CV sketch has been updated to work with Arduino 1.0 - grab it here Also be sure to use the new version of the Midi Library as well! Also, also: Some previous comments on earlier posts seem to have been lost in a recent Disqus migration - apologies to previous commenters. 7 Comments Updated Midi Library & site changes 01.23.2012 Perhaps you noticed narbotic.com looks different? It is different! A big thanks to everyone who picked up a MidiVox kit - you are now the proud owner of a rare piece of electronics. Though the kit is no longer in production, there is now a new version of the Midi Libray which has been updated to work with the Arduino 1.0 IDE. In addition to an aesthetic reboot, this site will now serve as your premiere destination for all things Collin Cunningham on the web. (and I vow that will be the one & only time I refer to myself in the third-person) New things are in the works - more to come 2 Comments
http://narbotic.com/?p=130

1255 Sony Cassette Walkman Overview (1979 - 2003) - sonyvintage.com
Unofficial SONY vintage page Skip to content Home Personal Audio HiFi about sonyvintage.com My Collection ← Sony WM-WE1 (1997) Cassette Walkman 1979 → Sony Cassette Walkman Overview (1979 – 2003) Posted on February 18, 2012 by Quo TPS-L2 WM-2 WM-3 WM-3Ex WM-R2 WM-F2 WM-D6 WM-7 WM-DD WM-F5 WM-20 WM-F20 WM-DC2 WM-D6C WM-DDII WM-F15 WM-R15 WM-30 WM-F30 WM-40 WM-75 WM-F75 WM-F55 WM-55 WM-W800 WM-R55 WM-F85 WM-101 WM-F101 WM-F202 WM-R202 WM-F60 WM-57 WM-60 WM-F107 WM-D3 WM-109 WM-F109 WM-101 WM-102 WM-104 WM-F203 WM-51 WM-51 with radio WM-501 WM-504 WM-503 WM-509 WM-550C WM-52 WM-505 WM-701C WM-F701C WM-506 WM-F506 WM-F606 WM-609 WM-170/171/172 WM-F180 WM-F181 WM-607 WM-DD9 WM-R707 WM-F707 WM-702 WM-F702 WM-703C WM-507 WM-F507 WM-600 WM-190 WM-805 WM-EX80 WM-EX60 WM-EX70 WM-FX70 WM-EX85 WM-FX85 WM-EX90 WM-SX77 WM-WX88 WM-GX90 WM-EX88 WM-EX77 WM-FX77 WM-DX100 WM-EX78 WM-RX77 WM-EX66 WM-EX909 WM-GX77 WM-FX909 WM-EX707 WM-FX707 WM-FX505 WM-WX808 WM-EX606 WM-EX808/808HG WM-FX808 WM-GX707 WM-RX707 WM-EX999 WM-FX999 WM-EX777 WM-FX777 WM-EX555 WM-WX777 WM-EX666 WM-EX1・EX1HG WM-FX1 WM-EX511 WM-FX811 WM-EX911 WM-EX811 WM-GX711 WM-EJ95 WM-WX1 WM-GX312 WM-EX2 WM-FX2 WM-EX622 WM-FX822 WM-EQ2 WM-GX622 WM-EX922 WM-GX822 WM-RX822 WM-EX633 WM-EX641 WM-EX5 WM-FX5 WM-EX3 WM-FX833 WM-GX322 WM-MV1 WM-GX622 WM-GX655 WM-EQ3 WM-FX855 WM-WE1 WM-WE7 WM-FS1 WM-EX655 WM-EX7 WM-EQ5 WM-FK2 WM-EK1 WM-EQ9 WM-EX9 WM-EX677 WM-GX677 WM-FX877 WM-WE01 WM-FK5 WM-EK3 WM-EX20 WM-EX900 WM-EX600 WM-GX323 WM-GX200 WM-FX200 WM-EX2000 WM-EX910 WM-EX610 WM-EX615 WM-GX688 WM-GX400 WM-EX921 WM-EX621 WM-FX888 WM-EX631 WM-FX202 WM-GX202 WM-GX788 +22 0 This entry was posted in Cassette Walkman. Bookmark the permalink. ← Sony WM-WE1 (1997) Cassette Walkman 1979 → Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website Comment You may use these HTML tags and attributes:
Recent Posts Minidisc Walkman 2003 Minidisc Walkman 2002 Minidisc Walkman 2001 Minidisc Walkman 2000 Minidisc Walkman 1999 Minidisc Walkman 1998 Minidisc Walkman 2004 Minidisc Walkman 2005 Minidisc Walkman 2006 Minidisc Walkman 1997 Minidisc Walkman 1996 Minidisc Walkman 1995 Minidisc Walkman 1993 1994(us) Minidisc Walkman 1992 Sony TPS-L2 SOUNDABOUT (1979) Sony MZ-R91 MD Minidisc Walkman (1999) Sony MZ-R30 MD Minidisc Walkman (1996) Sony MZ-R2 MD Minidisc Walkman (1993) Sony MZ-E800 MD Minidisc Walkman (2000) Sony MZ-E90 MD Minidisc Walkman (1999) Sony MZ-E80 MD Minidisc Walkman (1998) Sony MZ-E75 MD Minidisc Walkman (1999) Sony MZ-E55 MD Minidisc Walkman (1998) Sony MZ-RH1 / MZ-M200 Hi-MD Minidisc Walkman (2006) Sony WM-EX999 Cassette Walkman (1993) Sony WM-F404 Cassette Walkman (1988) Sony WM-F501 Cassette Walkman (1987) Sony WM-F15 Cassette Walkman (1984) Sony WM-FX1 Cassette Walkman (1994) Sony WM-F101 Cassette Walkman (1985) Recently Liked Posts CD WALKMAN DISCMAN (1991) Sony D-50 D-5 DISCMAN (1984) Sony WM-F107 Cassette Walkman (1987) Sony TPS-L2 WALKMAN (1979) Sony WM-109 Cassette Walkman (1986) Sony D-EJ815 CD WALKMAN (2000) Sony D-E999 CD Walkman (2000) Sony D-NE900 CD Walkman (2004) CD WALKMAN DISCMAN (1987) Sony WM-150 Cassette Walkman (1988) CD WALKMAN DISCMAN (2005) Minidisc Walkman 1992 Cassette Walkman 1986 Sony D-515 DISCMAN (1992) Sony D-EJ01 D-E01 DISCMAN (1999) CD WALKMAN DISCMAN (1990) Sony D-11 DISCMAN (1990) Sony WM-EX505 Cassette Walkman (1999) Sony D-100 D-10 DISCMAN (1986) Sony WM-51 CASSETTE WALKMAN (1987) Sony WM-701C CASSETTE WALKMAN (1988) Cassette Walkman 1988 Minidisc Walkman 2003 Sony D-20 Discman (1988) Cassette Walkman 1989 Sony D-50mkII DISCMAN (1985) Sony D-135 DISCMAN (1994) Sony Cassette Walkman Overview (1979 - 2003) Sony MZ-R50 MINIDISC RECORDER (1997) Sony WM-50 (1985) Sony WM-EX606 Cassette Walkman (1993) Sony MZ-RH1 / MZ-M200 Hi-MD Minidisc Walkman (2006) CD WALKMAN DISCMAN (1993) Sony D-33 DISCMAN (1991) Sony WM-EX80 Cassette Walkman (1990) Sony D-Z555 D-555 DISCMAN (1989) Recent Comments Brandon Edwards on OLIVIER SEKNAZI on Sony WM-D6C (1984) Brandon on sonyvintage.com wm-F2 1 Brandon on Sony WM-DD30 CASSETTE WALKMAN (1989) Vlad Sabbath on Traffic Pages Pages|Hits |Unique Last 24 hours: 1,154 Last 7 days: 7,160 Last 30 days: 24,957 Online now: 2 Old posts Proudly powered by WordPress.
http://www.sonyvintage.com/?p=1034

1254 SONY TC-D5 Pro II, an impressive machine
Hi there, I received yesterday a SONT TC-D5 Pro II. I have seen it in photos and read comments about its quality, similar to the D6C. I liked so much the design with the two VU meters, and it seemed to me that it belongs to an era when build quality was driven by other rules.
http://www.stereo2go.com/displayForumTopic/content/284032791466040094?reply=288255372213350915

1211 Korg Forums :: View topic - Tristan Calvaire � Thick (seeking mixing comments)

http://www.korgforums.com/forum/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=497353&sid=9a5582d966f57a74c1f37049379aecc5

1153 Piwigo - alloyphoto
The Piwigo Plug-in allows you to export photos from Adobe Lightroom directly to a Piwigo hosting service. Piwigo is a photo gallery software for the web that comes with powerful features for publishing and managing your photo collection. Features Supports Export operations in Lightroom 2, 3, and 4 Supports Publish operations in Lightroom 3 and 4 Supports photo comments and ratings Enables you to Import existing online gallery structures into Lightroom catalog Provides automatic pairing of online photos with photos in the catalog based on photo name and capture time Synchronizes photo metadata Enables you to assign and modify album covers
http://alloyphoto.com/plugins/piwigo/

1133 Shutterdown Blog: General Archives
Meeting: Pittsburgh Modular By Antisa on September 30, 2011 12:37 AM | No Comments Tonight we got to play in the basement studio of Pittsburgh's very own modular synth Stradivari - tucked away on unassuming Pocusset Street in Squirrel Hill. Headed by local Richard Nicol, Pittsburgh Modular is fast becoming a contender in the world market of modular synthesizers - supplying analog enthusiasts in the US, Europe and Australia (and possibly elsewhere, but I got too distracted by the beautiful glowing oscillators)... Interest in Pittsburgh Modular is picking up speed - and it's no wonder. The modules are as pretty as they are solidly built. Nicol, who now shares design and manufacturing duties with Thomas O'Connor (Australia) and Scott Swartz (USA), had moved away from producing electronic sounds digitally, in part, because analog is more fun. "The key to modular synthesis is that its captivatingly fun," he says. "After playing with it for 5 minutes, you get sucked into its world... and the next thing you know, you've created something new."
http://shutterdownmusic.com/a/archive/general/

1020 GnomeActivityJournal - GNOME Live!
GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Contents GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Overview Code Getting in touch Use cases Grouping and Filtering Features TODO GUI Sprints Architecture Long term goals Video Mockups And Current Usage Sub Pages See Zeitgeist for information about the Zeitgeist engine used internally by the GNOME Activity Journal. Overview The GNOME Activity Journal is a tool for easily browsing and finding files on your computer. It uses Zeitgeist to get information and metadata on what files/websites/contacts/etc. you worked with. Links: Zeitgeist Website, Zeitgeist on Launchpad, GNOME Activity Journal on Launchpad Code The Zeitgeist code is split into two modules: GNOME Activity Journal (GTK+ interface) Project page: https://launchpad.net/gnome-activity-journal Repository: bzr branch lp:gnome-activity-journal Zeitgeist Engine Project page: https://launchpad.net/zeitgeist Repository: bzr branch lp:zeitgeist Getting in touch Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~gnome-zeitgeist-users IRC: #zeitgeist @ irc.freenode.net, #gnome-zeitgeist @ irc.gimp.org Use cases John turns on his computer to work on his seminar paper. Instead of digging through his hierarchal file system, he simply opens up GNOME Activity Journal and clicks on the top item in the "Recently Used Files" list. When he realizes that he can't remember the name of the website that he was reading for research yesterday, he simply looks at the list of files related to his paper and clicks on the website. More at the Zeitgeist Vision page. Grouping and Filtering Our goal is to group/filter the data by: Type of data Source Time Name Tags Neighbouring Data Comments Location of use (GPS) Features Browse activities Drag and Drop (not for links) Tagging Auto tagging Searching Filtering by Dataproviders/Time/Tags Bookmark Data TODO GUI Sprints Add an actions toolbar to quickly share items by email or instant messaging. (See nautilus-share) Architecture Experiment with Tracker, Soylent, and Empathy. Long term goals Better metadata extraction (see some of the sprints above) Integration with other computers and mobile devices. Video Zeitgeist video GAJ video Mockups And Current Usage Some work was done by the City of Largo in the past which replicated some of the features of the Activity Journal. Possibly some of this work can result in ideas for improving the User Interface. Mockups And Usage. Sub Pages /BolzanoIdeas /CityOfLargo /Ideas
http://live.gnome.org/action/show/GnomeActivityJournal?action=show&redirect=GnomeZeitgeist

1005 COIL MUTEK
Blue Rats Drip Drop Triple Sun Radio Westin The First Five Minutes After Violent Death 7.5mb MOV 5.0MB MOV Live @ Mutek 29may03 Visit FlightDynamics Audio - 85.2MB MP3 Return to Offnominal Scraps Comments to logickal23@gmail.com
http://www.offnominal.com/scraps/coil/

921 Tapeline.info - Content
Established in 1985 ~ Serving the Audio and Video industry for over 25 years News, news, New, new, Technology, technology, Headlines, headlines, Nuke, nuke, PHP-Nuke, phpnuke, php-nuke, Geek, geek, Geeks, geeks, Hacker, hacker, Hackers, hackers, Linux, linux, Windows, windows, Software, software, Download, download, Downloads, downloads, Free, FREE, free, Community, community, MP3, mp3, Forum, forum, Forums, forums, Bulletin, bulletin, Board, board, Boards, boards, PHP, php, Survey, survey, Kernel, kernel, Comment, comment, Comments, comments, Portal, portal, ODP, odp, Open, open, Open Source, OpenSource, Opensource, opensource, open source, Free Software, FreeSoftware, Freesoftware, free software, GNU, gnu, GPL, gpl, License, license, Unix, UNIX, *nix, unix, MySQL, mysql, SQL, sql, Database, DataBase, Blogs, blogs, Blog, blog, database, Mandrake, mandrake, Red Hat, RedHat, red hat, Slackware, slackware, SUSE, SuSE, suse, Debian, debian, Gnome, GNOME, gnome, Kde, KDE, kde, Enlightenment, enlightenment, Interactive, interactive, Programming, programming, Extreme, extreme, Game, game, Games, games, Web Site, web site, Weblog, WebLog, weblog, Guru, GURU, guru, Oracle, oracle, db2, DB2, odbc, ODBC, plugin, plugins, Plugin, Plugins
http://www.tapeline.info/site/modules.php?name=Content&pa=showpage&pid=6

721 DNA seen through the eyes of a coder
This is just some rambling by a computer programmer about DNA. I'm not a molecular geneticist. If you spot the inevitable mistakes, please mail me (bert hubert) at ahu@ds9a.nl. I'm not trying to force my view unto the DNA - each observation here is quite 'uncramped'. To see where I got all this from, head to the bibliography. Quick links: The source code, Position Independent Code, Conditional compilation, Dead code, bloat, comments ('junk dna'), fork() and fork bombs ('tumors'), Mirroring, failover, Cluttered APIs, dependency hell, Viruses, worms, Central Dogma, Binary patching aka 'Gene therapy', Bug Regression, Reed-Solomon codes: 'Forward Error Correction', Holy Code, Framing errors: start and stop bits, Massive multiprocessing: each cell is a universe, Self hosting & bootstrapping, The Makefile, Further reading.
http://ds9a.nl/amazing-dna/

714 30 free programming eBooks « citizen428.blog()
Since this post got quite popular I decided to incorporate some of the excellent suggestions posted in the comments, so this list now has more than 40 books in it. [UPDATED: 2010-10-12] Learning a new programming language always is fun and there are many great books legally available for free online. Here’s a selection of 30 of them: Lisp/Scheme: How to Desing Programs Interpreting Lisp (PDF, suggested by Gary Knott) Let Over Lambda On Lisp Practical Common Lisp Programming in Emacs Lisp Programming Languages. Application and Interpretation (suggested by Alex Ott) Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days Visual LISP Developer’s Bible (suggested by “skatterbrainz”) Ruby: Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Design Patterns in Ruby Learn to Program MacRuby: The Definitive Guide Mr. Neighborly’s Humble Little Ruby Book (suggested by @tundal45) Programming Ruby Read Ruby 1.9 Ruby Best Practices Ruby on Rails Tutorial Book (suggested by @tundal45) Javascript: Building iPhone Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Eloquent Javascript jQuery Fundamentals Mastering Node Haskell: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good Real World Haskell Erlang: Concurrent Programming in Erlang Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good Python: Dive into Python How to Think Like a Computer Scientist – Learning with Python Smalltalk: Dynamic Web Development with Seaside Pharo by Example (based on the next book in this list, suggested by Anonymous) Squeak by Example Misc: Algorithms The Art of Assembly Language Beginning Perl Building Accessible Websites (suggested by Joe Clark) The C Book C# Yellow Book (suggested by Joe Wyatt) Compiler Construction Dive Into HTML 5 (suggested by @til) Higher-Order Perl The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages (suggested by “Def”) An Introduction to R Learn Prolog Now! Objective-C 2.0 Essentials Programming Scala Of course there are many more free programming eBooks, but this list consists of the ones I read or want(ed) to read. This is far from comprehensive and languages that are completely missing are mostly left out on purpose (e.g. PHP, C++, Java). I’m sure somebody else made a list for them somewhere.
http://citizen428.net/archives/434

713 40 Useful Online Generators For Web Designers - Noupe Design Blog
Generators can be a great way to save time in your web design projects. High-quality generators can create graphics or code or even layouts in a matter of seconds or minutes, things that might take an hour or more if done by hand. Below are some useful generators to help you speed up your web design process. There’s everything from color scheme tools to complete layout generators included. If you know of other useful generators out there, please share in the comments!
http://www.noupe.com/tools/40-useful-online-generators.html

623 Less Framework 2
A CSS framework for cross-device layouts .grid_5 .clearfix 960 px Everyone writes CSS differently. Less Framework takes this into account by having a minimal set of features, and does away with things like predefined classes. All it really contains are: a set of media-queries typography presets aligned to a 24 px baseline grid and a grid, with its column sizes noted down within CSS comments. Nothing more, nothing less. It doesn’t try to do anything for you, and doesn’t change the way you work.
http://lessframework.com/

608 Stories In Flight | HTML5/CSS3 Cheatsheet
Here are some simple cut-and-paste examples of HTML5/CSS3 features that are currently (mid-2010) usable across a number of web browsers, chief among them Firefox, Safari, Chrome and Opera. For many of the CSS3 examples, Internet Explorer is the lone holdout with a limited number of workarounds, however these features degrade gracefully and may still be useful on new projects as long as this limitation is kept in mind. Both for SVG and Canvas there exist solid workarounds in the form of JavaScript libraries that allow even Internet Explorer to display these new objects, and in the case of SVGweb it may be a good idea to use this workaround for all browsers to limit the variability of the SVG rendering across platforms. Please note: With the exception of SVGWeb, no Internet Explorer workarounds have been included on this page - most of the examples will therefore not work in IE6, IE7 or IE8. And if you want to discuss any of the code below or leave a correction or suggestion, you can leave comments below and here is also The Web We Should Have on my blog. Thanks! On this page: HTML5 DOCTYPE Rounded Corners Rounded Corners Redux: Circles Box Shadows Text Shadows Border Images Transform Rotate Column Layout SVG Canvas Canvas Text Canvas Text Rotate Some more complex subjects are also discussed in these separate pages: CSS3 Transforms Ruby Annotations Multiple Background Images HTML5 Audio and JavaScript Control HTML5 Audio Data API - Spectrum Visualizer JavaScript: Binary Loader Google Font API and Font Loading Behavior JavaScript: Sorting DIVs JavaScript: HTML5 Video with SRT Subtitles ...and don't forget to leave some comments below!
http://www.storiesinflight.com/html5/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

395 The Ultimate CSS3 Toolbox: 50+ Resources, Tutorials and Articles | CreativeFan
The ultimate CSS3 toolbox, with introductory articles, then tutorials, then see what's possible with inspiration and finally some more resources. css3, css, resources, tutorials, tips, tricks, techniques, css3 tips, css3 tutorials, css3 tutorial, css3 tip, css techniques, css3 techniques Last week, I published a massive roundup of HTML5 resources, articles, tips and techniques, and it was a big hit within the design and development community. Since HTML5 is only of the upgrades that is being rolled out, I thought it would be appropriate and helpful to assemble a set of CSS3 resources. This post serves as the ultimate CSS3 toolbox. You’ll start with a few introductory articles, then jump right in with tutorials, then see what’s possible with inspiration and finally some more resources. If you have any resources to add to the list, please, let us know in the comments!
http://creativefan.com/the-ultimate-css3-toolbox-50-resources-tutorials-and-articles/

372 La Taverne de GueX: Bruxelles
solfege ds
http://latavernedeguex.blogspot.com/2010/04/bruxelles.html#comments

362 90+ Essential Social Media Resources
Check out our extensive list of social media, business, mobile and tech resources. No matter what you're into, you're sure to find it here! Business Lists,Facebook Lists,Lists,Megalists,Mobile Lists,Social Media Lists,Twitter Lists,business,facebook,features,iPhone Resource Lists,social media,twitter,youtube Now you’ve gone and done it. You’ve come across a list so enormous, so useful, and so awesome, our futile attempts to describe it have been lost in the tubes of cyberspace. We’ll just say this: No matter what you’re into — Twitter, Facebook, Mobile Apps, Business Development, or good-old-fashioned YouTube hilarity — you will find it below. So put down your barbeque, send out another huge thanks to our men and women in uniform, and limber up your scrolling finger — it’s a big one. If you dig the uber-list, be sure to send some comments our way down below!
http://mashable.com/2010/05/31/92-essential-social-media-resources/

285 2010 Trends article on LogoLounge.Com
logo, logos, corporate identity, branding, brand, competition, graphic, design, graphic design, drawing, sketch, rendering, sketch, search, cross referenced, trade mark, word, word mark, typographic, designer, design firm, mark, logo lounge, lounge, submit, book, margo chase, john sayles, hornall anderson, art chantry, rudiger goetz, michael vanderbyl, chermayeff & geismar inc, cronan group, liska associates, werner design, werks bird design, sandstrom design, simon & goetz, jay vigon, wink, landor and associates, mires, willoughby design group
http://www.logolounge.com/articles/default_comments.asp?ArticleID=782

101 - 201