100SILEX, de 0 à 100 s: each
1517 THE MUTANT MACHINE Dynamic Analog Percussion Engine
MICROCONTROLLER FREE ANALOG PERCUSSION SYNTHESIS unique Inverter Core oscillators form the MEMBRANE. Each analog oscillator has three waveforms to select from capable of synthesizing everything from heavy-hitting bassdrums to classic 909-style snares and other complex timbres modular design gives the Machine many auxiliary purposes, great for modular sound design of many varieties, and not just percussion the SNAPPY section is comprised of a voltage controlled noise oscillator, for modelling the noisy part of drum timbres both MEMBRANE and SNAPPY elements have an external input for replacing the built-in sound sources, opening up many avenues of possibility 13 control voltage and audio inputs, for a fully modular drum experience 7 audio and CV/gate outputs for maximum integration with other modules dedicated outputs for each WAVE and NOISE oscillator mean you can use the Machine as a complex VCO in your system, when not synthesizing percussion WAVEFORM SCANNING FEATURE GENERATES COMPLEX TIMBRES the MEMBRANE’s waveforms can be scanned through automatically by the wavescanner’s voltage controlled clock generator, or an external clock or VCO can be used SCAN FREQ CV forms a unique form of timbre control, making the Machine act like a complex oscillator at its WAVES output the ENABLE input allows you to gate the wavescanner on and off with a CV or gate signal ARCHITECTURE OF THE MACHINE The Mutant Machine is a dynamic analog instrument capable of generating a wide palette of sounds, ranging from various forms of analog percussion to complex drones and oscillations. To achieve this, the Machine features two synthesis sections which are summed together at the final output: MEMBRANE and SNAPPY. Like the other Mutant Drums, the MEMBRANE and SNAPPY circuits began their mutation as classic analog percussion techniques and have been reimagined for 21st century modular synthesis. The MEMBRANE forms the main body of the sound by way of two analog VCOs, and the SNAPPY section further adds to the timbre by contributing noisy elements to the mix. A noisy CLICK which occurs at the beginning of the SNAPPY sound can have its volume adjusted independent of the main decaying SNAPPY texture. The waveforms which make up the MEMBRANE can be selected manually by button press, or the WAVESCANNER can be used to automatically scan through the available analog waveforms. By modulating the frequency through which waves are scanned, unique, complex sounds are created. Experimentation is encouraged by the many modulation inputs and outputs available to you. The Machine features 8 CV and gate inputs for modulation as well as two external audio inputs, for bringing other modules into the Machine’s core. There are many audio outputs for maximum versatility, allowing you to use the Machine to create drones and alien timbres for use elsewhere in the modular analog system.
http://www.hexinverter.net/mutant-machine

1408 » Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Animodule.com
Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Here’s a quick photodoc of how I made a reusable SMT stencil from some aluminum siding I had laying around. It’s very simple to assemble and works great. Dirt cheap too. I had picked up a roll of aluminum flashing a few years ago to flash some chimneys I rebuilt/repointed and was curious to see how it would hold up as an SMT stencil. To buy an SMT stencil frame is near $1000 so I didn’t have much to lose if it didn’t work out. I cut the frame out of some birch plywood since I had some handy. Really any sturdy frame would do the trick. You could easily glue one together out of some 1x or trim board. I put a thicker sheet of aluminum down underneath the flashing to give the CNC endmill something sturdy to cut against and clamped it down stretched and tight. My thought there was that If I cut straight on the MDF it might push on the flashing and bend it before it cut through. A 1mm endmill did the trick. Each pass was .05mm deep. I pulled the Flashing tight and stapled it to the frame. No rocket science here. I taped up the inside edges so no solderpaste could squeeze between the frame and the stencil. I had some old screen print hinge boards so I just attached this frame the same way I would a screen print stencil. The only fiddly part was aligning the first PCB. You have to push around a little and lift the stencil and fiddle with it a little bit. Once I get all the pads lined up correctly I hold it in place and trace around it with a thin tip sharpie marker. Then you place the PCB in the outline. If you have the height adjusted correctly the stencil is sturdy enough to hold the PCB in place while you print the Solderpaste on it. just hold the stencil frame down and it pushes down on the PCB. I used a flexible putty knife as a squeegee. It worked fine. Cleanup was a breeze. Just scrape it off, unscrew the stencil frame from the hingeboard and stick it in the corner till you are ready to do another run.
http://www.animodule.com/diy-2/cut-simple-smt-stencil-from-common-aluminum-flashing-on-your-cnc/

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1257 CiteSeerX — Eigenrhythms: Drum pattern basis sets for classification and generation
CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): We took a collection of 100 drum beats from popular music tracks and estimated the measure length and downbeat position of each one. Using these values, we normalized each pattern to form an ensemble of aligned drum patterns. Principal Component Analysis on this data set results in a set of basis ñ€˜patterns ñ€™ that can be combined to give approximations and interpolations of all the examples. We use this low-dimension representation of the drum patterns as a space for classification and visualization, and discuss its application to generating continua of rhythms. Our classification results were very modest ñ€“ about 20 % correct on a 10-way genre classification task ñ€“ but we show that the projection into principal component space reveals aspects of the rhythm that are largely orthogonal to genre but are still perceptually relevant. CiteSeerX, Daniel P. W. Ellis, John Arroyo
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.113.1505

1256 Sony | Vintage Electronics Have Soul – The Pocket Calculator Show Website
We owe much gratitude to Sony, for they were responsible for making the personal stereo cassette player a reality. For over 25 years, Sony has been bringing a personal, portable stereo music experience to our ears–creativity and innovation have continued to make Walkman a useful product to everyone. Walkman has reached pop icon status and become a symbol of youth, individuality and freedom. In 1979 Sony warned, “Remember the name: Walkman.” How could we forget?
http://pocketcalculatorshow.com/walkman/sony/

1244 CiteSeerX — Eigenrhythms: Drum pattern basis sets for classification and generation
CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): We took a collection of 100 drum beats from popular music tracks and estimated the measure length and downbeat position of each one. Using these values, we normalized each pattern to form an ensemble of aligned drum patterns. Principal Component Analysis on this data set results in a set of basis ñ€˜patterns ñ€™ that can be combined to give approximations and interpolations of all the examples. We use this low-dimension representation of the drum patterns as a space for classification and visualization, and discuss its application to generating continua of rhythms. Our classification results were very modest ñ€“ about 20 % correct on a 10-way genre classification task ñ€“ but we show that the projection into principal component space reveals aspects of the rhythm that are largely orthogonal to genre but are still perceptually relevant. CiteSeerX, Daniel P. W. Ellis, John Arroyo
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.113.1505

1078 The Modular Synth
A long time ago, in a galaxy far away, before your local music shop was packed with the latest digital synths, even before the early analogue monosynths, if you wanted a synthesizer you had to make it yourself. Modular synthesis is not in itself a different type of synthesis, but refers to the fact that a synth would be built up from individual components (modules) , which would be linked together (patched) in a configuration decided by the person doing the building. Compared with today's 'plug and play' synths which come with 100's of presets, GM soundsets, etc, this has the obvious disadvantage that 'recalling' a preset can only be done if your synth is patched together in exactly the same way every time and every controller has to be manually set to the same parameter. However, the big advantage of Modular synthesis, of course, is that, providing you have the right components, you can build practically anything you want, without being constrained by the 'hardwired' configurations of modern factory built synthesizers. The Pulsar/Scope Modular synth, like any other Modular 'soft synth' brings together the advantages of both Modular synths and modern factory built synths. Modular configurations can be saved as patches for total recall later on, and each patch can contain any number of presets, again for later recall. Furthermore, with a software modular, you can re-use each component as many times as you wish within one patch, you never run out of cables, you don't have to dedicate a whole room to the synth and the modules never suffer from physical damage. What's more, each parameter can be controlled by MIDI so parameter changes can be recorded into your sequencer in real-time.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/themodularsynth.shtml

1069 WebAudio Drum Machine
Create custom drum beats with a few clicks. Choose from 15 drum kits and 26 effects, and adjust the pitch of each drum. Save and share your beatsñ€© rock on!
http://chromium.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/samples/audio/shiny-drum-machine.html

992 Troy Hunt: Who’s who of bad password practices – banks, airlines and more
Troy Hunt on observations, musings and conjecture about the world of software and technology Troy Hunt, blog, .NET, Azure, Backup, Bing, Blogger, Career Development, Code Quality, Conference, Database, Design Utopia, DotNetNuke, Enterprise Software Platform, Internet Explorer, iPhone, K2, LinkedIn, Media, NDepend, Online Identity, OWASP, People Management, Personal Development, Product Review, ReSharper, Security, SharePoint, Silverlight, Software Quality, SQL Injection, SQL Server, Subversion, Travel, Twitter, Visual Studio, Windows Mobile, XSS, Ah, passwords. Love ‘em or hate ‘em, they’re a necessary evil of the digital age. The reality is we all end up with an alphabet soup of passwords spread over dozens of various sites and services across the internet. Whilst we might not always practice it, we all know the theory of creating a good password; uniqueness, randomness and length. The more of each, the better. Of course we frequently don’t do this because of all sorts of human factors such as convenience, memory or simple unawareness of the risks. Still, when it’s a case of individuals electing not to create secure passwords, they really only have themselves to blame. But what happens when the website won’t allow you to create a secure password? Or at least when they severely constrain your ability to create long, random, unique passwords? And what about when they don’t allow you to send it between your computer and their server securely? Even worse, what happens when our most “secure” institutions implement lazy password policies? Unfortunately, all of this is pretty rampant practice.
http://www.troyhunt.com/2011/01/whos-who-of-bad-password-practices.html

897 Generic Synth Preset Storage and Conversion
For my synths with preset storage and the ability to dump & load presets via midi sysex, I wanted to be able to feed the sysex of a synth into a software program which can display the sound parameters in a meaningful form, and convert the sound into the sysex format of any of my other presets synths The generic patch storage format must display meaningful values for the parameters (filter envelope amount = 1/2 octave, envelope 1 attack = 50ms, etc) and convert between these values and a given synth's sysex (as much as possible - resolution probably isn't good enough to get envelope attack to exactly 50ms on each and every synth, and envelope shapes vary between synths, etc). The storage format will also store the original parameters, using the "native" value range of each parameter (e.g. filter cutoff frequency between 0 and 127) as well as the original sysex program as an ASCII hex dump. Since I didn't find any software which could do this, I began writing my own in Java. I am concentrating on converting basic analog components; any on-board effects are not used.
http://www.nmrailrunners.org/synth/gpc/index.html

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.
http://jhaible.de/polykorg/jh_polykorg_clone.html

871 Get familiar with HTML5! - Dev.Opera
Dev.Opera article: Get familiar with HTML5! developer,article,html, wsc,html5,web standards curriculum,open web Introduction Most of the web standards curriculum is based on the last stable version of HTML — HTML 4.01. The HTML 4.01 spec was completed in 1999, over 10 years ago as of the time of this writing! But unless you've been hiding under a rock for the last year or so, you'll be well aware that there is a new version of HTML in production — HTML5! So why have we been teaching you HTML 4.01 in spite of this? In this article we'll answer this question, and many more. We'll give you the essential background you need to know on why HTML5 came about, and where it is up to now. We'll advise you on how it can fit into your learning right now, even if you are a novice web designer or developer, and we will look at some of the main features of HTML5, so you can see what it adds to the already powerful HTML language.
http://dev.opera.com/articles/view/get-familiar-with-html5/

813 15 MORE Free Guides That Really Teach You USEFUL Stuff
During 2010, we've written a bunch of new PDF manuals for you, on all kinds of subjects, from Facebook privacy to Dropbox tips. After releasing 15 NEW
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/15-free-guides-teach-stuff/

788 Setting Up Your Digital Camera For HDR Shooting
You’ve probably heard of High Dynamic Range (HDR) Photography, it’s made quite an entrance into the world of digital photography. If you haven’t, the HDR process is accomplished by taking multiple exposures of a high contrast scene (usually a landscape or cityscape), at different levels of brightness, and then combining the best light from each exposure into one image. The end result is a stunning image that very closely resembles how the human eye views a scene. This process of digital manipulation has caused a bit of controversy and debate in the world of photography, especially with images that are “over-cooked.” One thing is for sure though, HDR is here to stay. When done right, this unique and in depth processing technique can produce beautiful works of art that mimic the way we view and remember a landscape or scene. The above image is an example of what HDR processing can produce. This image, taken from the Big Island of Hawaii, would not be possible without HDR processing. It was taken around noon, the harshest light of the day. The first image is the best image my camera could produce given the situation. While still beautiful, there are obvious problems. Get ready, this article is going to show you how to take your digital camera and turn it into an HDR shooting machine!
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/setting-up-your-digital-camera-for-hdr-shooting

772 16 Step Sequencer (With improved PCB) (+/-9V to +/-15V)
Article by Ray Wilson Back to "Music From Outer Space" Analog Synth Pages Watch Thomas White's Excellent Sequencer Videos on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EU6d24_eZ08 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvZi-YMvHRE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5cx6Z7wDOg Thomas White used the MFOS sequencer boards to produce this incredible rotary sequencer. Visit his site to keep up with his latest awesome projects. Features Improved PC board (far less kludging). Produces sequences of 4 to 16 steps in length Modes include stop at count, reverse at count, reset at count and random 16 mode Each step has coarse tune, fine tune, and switchable gate Accepts external clock and external start pulse. Simultaneous outputs with and without portamento. Forward, Back, and Reset controls ease sequence set up. Introduction Please see the pages at 16 Step Analog Sequencer Circuit for details regarding circuit descriptions etc. This page is here soley as a vehicle to present the new PC boards and support board purchases. The schematic and PCBs presented here incorporate all of the improvements and modifications shown on the previous sequencer pages. Panel to board wiring is presented here. Please browse the entire page before ordering board to ensure you understand the circuit and there is enough information provided here for you to successfully complete the project prior to purchasing PC boards. Thanks.
http://www.musicfromouterspace.com/analogsynth/SEQ16_2006/SEQ16_2006.php

769 Snyderphonics Manta - Un nouveau controleur qui risque de faire du bruit
Voilà un nouveau controleur tactile qui pourrait bien concurrencer, à terme, le 222e Buchla. Cela ressemble à ça: et voici les caractéristiques (en anglais): Citation:For instance, you could assign each sensor to a note in a musical scale, ...
http://synthe-modulaire.forumactif.com/outils-et-documentations-f6/snyderphonics-manta-un-nouveau-controleur-qui-risque-de-faire-du-bruit-t86.htm

766 [WS001] Circuit-Bending – Initiation « Gasol
Introduction Le Circuit-Bending ou Circuitage dĂ©signe l’activitĂ© qui consiste Ă  volontairement court-circuiter un appareil Ă©lectronique (gĂ©nĂ©ralement sonore) afin de provoquer des comportements inattendus pour le dĂ©tourner de son usage d’origine. Par exemple, un jouet sonore pour enfant ou une console de jeu gĂ©nĂ©reront des sons ou des images plus ou moins alĂ©atoires et imprĂ©visibles. Ce terme Ă  Ă©tĂ© introduit par Reed Ghazala dans les annĂ©e 60 lorsqu’il court-circuita accidentellement l’un de ses instruments. Mais des mĂ©thodes similaires ont Ă©tĂ© utilisĂ©es auparavant par d’autres musiciens et ingĂ©nieurs. Cette activitĂ© peut ĂȘtre assimilĂ©e Ă  une certaine forme d’art, de part le dĂ©tournement, l’appropriation et la personnalisation de ces appareils ainsi que leurs usages lors de performances audiovisuelles. C’est l’art du court-circuit. On rencontrera souvent les termes Circuit-Bender ou Bender pour dĂ©signer la personne qui effectue ces modifications et on parlera de Bends pour toutes modifications apportĂ©es Ă  l’appareil. Attention: Ne jamais tenter ces manipulations sur des appareils alimentĂ©s par une tension supĂ©rieure Ă  12V, risque d’électrocution. Ne pas torturer des appareils trop onĂ©reux ou auxquels on tient, en effet il existe un haut risque de casse irrĂ©versible qui transformera le jouet en un joli presse papier. Un peu de thĂ©orie Le Circuitage ne demande pas de grandes connaissances en Ă©lectronique, mais quelques bases sont nĂ©cessaires Ă  l’apprĂ©hension de cette activitĂ©. Notamment la reconnaissance des divers composants Ă©lectroniques qui seront utilisĂ©s ou court-circuitĂ©s. RĂ©sistances La rĂ©sistance est surement le composant le plus rĂ©pandu. Sa principale caractĂ©ristique est d’opposer une plus ou moins grande rĂ©sistance Ă  la circulation du courant Ă©lectrique. Sa valeur (mesurĂ©e en ohms) peut ĂȘtre dĂ©terminĂ©e par un code couleur ou lue sur le boĂźtier des composants les plus rĂ©cents. PotentiomĂštres Un potentiomĂštre n’est autre qu’une rĂ©sistance ajustable. Il possĂšde 3 pattes ainsi qu’un systĂšme mĂ©canique permettant la variation de la rĂ©sistance. Photo-rĂ©sistances Une photo-rĂ©sistance est Ă©galement une rĂ©sistance dont la valeur varie en fonction de l’intensitĂ© lumineuse. On peut Ă©galement le nommer rĂ©sistance photo-dĂ©pendante (light-dependent resistor (LDR)) ou photoconducteur. Condensateurs Un condensateur est un composant Ă©lectronique ou Ă©lectrique Ă©lĂ©mentaire qui a pour propriĂ©tĂ© principale de pouvoir stocker des charges Ă©lectriques opposĂ©es sur ses armatures. Il est utilisĂ© principalement pour stabiliser une alimentation Ă©lectrique, traiter des signaux pĂ©riodiques, sĂ©parer le courant alternatif du courant continu, stocker de l’énergie. Diodes La diode est principalement utilisĂ©e comme convertisseur de courant alternatif vers du courant continu ou comme multiplicateur ou rĂ©gulateur de tension. C’est un composant polarisĂ©, ce qui signifie que le sens de branchement a une importance sur le fonctionnement du montage. Diodes Electro-Luminescentes (DEL / LED) La LED possĂšde la particularitĂ© de gĂ©nĂ©rer de la lumiĂšre lorsqu’elle est parcourue par un courant. De la mĂȘme maniĂšre que la diode, ce composant est polarisĂ©. Transistors Le transistor est le composant actif utilisĂ© principalement comme interrupteur commandĂ© ou pour l’amplification, mais aussi pour stabiliser une tension ou moduler un signal. Circuits intĂ©grĂ©s Le circuit intĂ©grĂ© (CI), aussi appelĂ© puce Ă©lectronique, est un composant Ă©lectronique reproduisant une ou plusieurs fonctions Ă©lectroniques plus ou moins complexes, intĂ©grant souvent plusieurs types de composants Ă©lectroniques de base dans un volume rĂ©duit, rendant le circuit facile Ă  mettre en Ɠuvre. Il existe une trĂšs grande variĂ©tĂ© de ces composants divisĂ©s en deux grandes catĂ©gories : analogique et numĂ©rique. Interrupteurs Un interrupteur est un dispositif permettant d’interrompre ou d’autoriser le passage d’un flux. Boutons poussoirs Le bouton poussoir est une touche tactile qui permet de faire une liaison Ă©lectrique momentanĂ©e le temps que l’on appuie dessus ou, sur certains modĂšles inversĂ©s, d’ouvrir temporairement le contact Ă©lectrique. Connecteurs Jack Format de connecteur mĂąle et femelle gĂ©nĂ©ralement utilisĂ© pour les connexions audio de types casques et micros. Le mini Jack fait 3,5 mm de diamĂštre, le jack normal fait 6,35 mm. MatĂ©riel et compĂ©tences Pour mener Ă  bien ces projets et en plus de certains composants citĂ©s ci-dessus, il faudra ĂȘtre Ă©quipĂ© du matĂ©riel basique (tournevis, fer Ă  souder, Ă©tain, pompe Ă  dessouder, cĂąblage, pinces coupantes, pinces croco, perceuse, dremel 
) De plus, il faudra un minimum de compĂ©tences en soudage, mais tout le monde se souvient des cours de technologies au collĂšge et dans tous les cas, ces compĂ©tences s’acquiĂšrent vite aprĂšs quelques essais. Il faudra simplement veiller Ă  ne pas dĂ©poser la panne du fer trop longtemps sur un composant pour ne pas l’endommager et ne pas faire baver l’étain au risque de crĂ©er un court-circuit non souhaitĂ©. Il faudra Ă©galement s’armer de patience, c’est la qualitĂ© premiĂšre et la plus haute compĂ©tence d’un Bender. En effet, un jouet nĂ©cessite gĂ©nĂ©ralement entre 4 Ă  12h pour ĂȘtre modifiĂ© (dont les 3/4 de ce temps sont consacrĂ©s Ă  la recherche des Bends). Avec l’expĂ©rience ce temps sera considĂ©rablement rĂ©duit. Beaucoup de pratique Victimes potentielles Pour dĂ©buter, l’idĂ©al est de s’attaquer Ă  des appareils peu couteux tels que des jouets sonores rĂ©cupĂ©rĂ©s dans votre cave ou lors de vide-greniers. Les plus rĂ©putĂ©s Ă©tant les jouets vintages du type DictĂ©e Magique et dĂ©rivĂ©s (Speak&Spell/Math/Learn), les insupportables Furby, les petits synthĂ©tiseurs type Casio SK-1 
 Tout ce qui possĂšde un haut-parleur, fonctionne sur piles ou en dessous de 12V. Plus particuliĂšrement les appareils fabriquĂ©s durant les annĂ©es 80/90 qui ne sont pas encore Ă©quipĂ©s de composants Ă©lectroniques sophistiquĂ©s ou de circuits entiĂšrement numĂ©riques. Les constructeurs les plus connus sont: Texas Instruments, Casio, Vtech, Coleco, Creatoy. Il est Ă©videmment possible d’élargir les domaines de recherches Ă  des appareils plus Ă©laborĂ©s mais gare Ă  l’irrĂ©versible court-circuit meurtrier qui mettra dĂ©finitivement la machine hors-service. Recherche Il faut tout d’abord dĂ©sosser votre cible pour mettre Ă  nu le circuit Ă©lectronique. Ensuite, on allume le jouet pour lui faire Ă©mettre un son et on test simplement sa rĂ©activitĂ© en posant plusieurs doigts simultanĂ©ment sur diffĂ©rents endroits du circuit. GĂ©nĂ©ralement, un effet de « pitch » se fait entendre (baisse/augmentation de la tonalitĂ©), on comprend alors que la machine est sensible au Circuitage et les choses sĂ©rieuses peuvent donc commencer (toutes les machines ne sont pas forcement sensibles au toucher, mais c’est une bonne technique d’approche). Afin de ne pas avoir Ă  mĂ©moriser tous les endroits sensibles, l’idĂ©al est de prendre une photo du circuit, de la transferer sur un ordinateur et ainsi noter pas Ă  pas Ă  l’aide d’un logiciel de dessin type MSPaint ou Photoshop tous les Bends dĂ©couverts. Certains les notent directement sur le circuit Ă  l’aide d’un stylo ou d’un feutre, mais l’encre contenant gĂ©nĂ©ralement du carbone et le carbone Ă©tant conducteur, il existe un risque de court-circuit non dĂ©sirĂ© dont on pourra difficilement se dĂ©faire. La premiĂšre et la plus simple des modifications Ă  apporter Ă  son appareil est le raccordement Ă  un ampli ou une console de mixage. Il sera alors possible d’enregistrer les sons de la machine ou de l’utiliser lors de performances live. Pour ce faire, on repĂšre gĂ©nĂ©ralement le haut-parleur et on le remplace ou on installe en parallĂšle un connecteur Jack. Dans le second cas, l’ajout d’un interrupteur pourra servir Ă  basculer entre la sortie audio ou le haut-parleur. On peut maintenant commencer Ă  parcourir mĂ©thodiquement ou au hasard le circuit Ă  l’aide d’un testeur. Le plus simple est d’utiliser des pinces croco que l’on raccordera Ă  deux petits tournevis d’horloger. On place la pointe du premier tournevis qui restera stationnaire sur un point du circuit et avec le second on parcourt diffĂ©rents autres points en Ă©coutant les changements de sons intĂ©ressants que l’on note au fur et Ă  mesure sur notre photo. On poursuit ensuite en dĂ©plaçant le premier tournevis sur un autre point et en recommençant notre parcours avec le second. On rĂ©pĂšte cette procĂ©dure jusqu’à ce que la totalitĂ© du circuit ait Ă©tĂ© parcouru ou lorsque nous estimons avoir trouvĂ© toutes les modifications souhaitĂ©es. Les Bends les plus courants sont gĂ©nĂ©ralement: la sortie audio permettant l’amplification, le volume, l’overdrive/distortion, les glitches, les boucles, le bouton reset. Dans certains cas, les Bends ne sont pas compatibles entre-eux. La machine plantera irrĂ©mĂ©diablement dĂšs lors qu’on activera plusieurs Bends simultanĂ©ment. On peut alors dĂ©cider de continuer la quĂȘte des modifications compatibles ou bien Ă©viter d’en activer plusieurs Ă  la fois. CĂąblage et placement des composants La prochaine Ă©tape est le raccordement des diffĂ©rents points du circuit trouvĂ©s prĂ©cĂ©demment. On les relie entre eux en soudant un fin cĂąble de cuivre sur chaque point. On placera ensuite, par exemple, un interrupteur entre deux de ces cĂąbles allant de paires, de maniĂšre Ă  (dĂ©s)activer notre court-circuit. Il est aussi possible dans certains cas de remplacer ou coupler l’interrupteur Ă  un potentiomĂštre ou une photo-rĂ©sistance qui appliquera une plus ou moins grande rĂ©sistance au passage du courant, attĂ©nuant ou accentuant ainsi l’effet du court-circuit (trĂšs utile pour les effets de pitch/volume/overdrive). Il est prĂ©fĂ©rable de ne pas souder le composant avant de l’avoir montĂ© sur le chĂąssis de la machine, de maniĂšre Ă  ne pas le dessouder par inadvertance lors de son placement. Utile aussi pour connaitre la bonne longueur des cĂąbles et leur cheminement et ainsi Ă©viter les surplus qui empĂȘcheraient la fermeture du boitier. Pour percer le chĂąssis, on utilisera une petite perceuse ou un Dremel. Le positionnement des composants est libre mais attention Ă  choisir un emplacement qui ne gĂȘnera ni la fermeture, ni l’ergonomie du boitier. En effet, un composant mal placĂ© et difficilement accessible pourrait compromettre la spontanĂ©itĂ© de la performance. Afin de ne pas trop endommager le chĂąssis, il est aussi possible de raccorder tous les composants sur un boitier externe qui servira de contrĂŽleur. Dans ce cas, l’utilisation d’un cĂąble nappe tel que l’on trouve dans un ordinateur peut ĂȘtre trĂšs pratique pour ne pas avoir des dizaines de fils qui sortent du chĂąssis (un cĂąble SCSI est parfait pour ce type de montage). Tests Il est maintenant l’heure de tester notre nouveau jouet ! Liens utiles http://www.anti-theory.com : Reed Ghazala, pĂšre du Circuit-Bending http://www.casperelectronics.com : Peter Edwards, grand maĂźtre Bender http://gieskes.nl : Gijs Gieskes, un extra-terrestre http://bitcrusher.free.fr : Mon cher ami Bitcrusher, grand Bender francophone http://www.dataglitch.org : Label associatif regroupant des amoureux des technologies Lo-Fi http://www.getlofi.com : Astuces et ressources pour dĂ©butants ou vĂ©tĂ©rans http://www.sailormouth.org : Des infos et des schĂ©mas trĂšs utiles http://www.datamath.org : MusĂ©e des produits Texas-Instruments http://www.miniorgan.com : Base de donnĂ©es de jouets plus ou moins rares CrĂ©ations personnelles Screaming Teacher aka Talking Teacher – Coleco Le Livre Tragique aka Le Livre Magique – TI Speak’n'Glitch’n'Bleep’n'Math aka Speak’n'Math – TI La Tortu(r)e aka Tortue Musicale – Carrefour LoFi Mic aka TĂ©lĂ©phone Ă  cadran – Socotel
http://www.gasol.fr/2010/06/30/5/

746 40 Essential CSS Templates, Resources and Downloads | Speckyboy Design Magazine
Every web developer should have in their toolbox a collection of CSS tools and resources like the ones outlined in this article. A set of techniques that you rely on and that are always at the ready to cover any possible eventuality. You will find not a selection of the latest innovative CSS techniques (there are some) in this article, merely a collection of tools, resources and downloads that can be used by web designers for solutions to everyday CSS design and coding solutions. The resources below have been split into four categories: CSS Download Packages (all of the CSS resources offer multiple variations of each technique), Downloadable CSS Tools (the resources within this category offers specialized templates), Web, Mobile & Form Frameworks (+ tools and templates to help you get started with each); Feature-Rich and Outstanding Mobile & Web Templates and finally, a selection of tools to help with cross browser compatibility. We don’t presume that this is an ultimate collection, merely a selection of resources we have found to be indispensable. We are positive we have missed a few, and would love to hear about the tools and resources you rely upon.
http://speckyboy.com/2010/11/08/40-essential-css-templates-resources-and-downloads/

721 DNA seen through the eyes of a coder
This is just some rambling by a computer programmer about DNA. I'm not a molecular geneticist. If you spot the inevitable mistakes, please mail me (bert hubert) at ahu@ds9a.nl. I'm not trying to force my view unto the DNA - each observation here is quite 'uncramped'. To see where I got all this from, head to the bibliography. Quick links: The source code, Position Independent Code, Conditional compilation, Dead code, bloat, comments ('junk dna'), fork() and fork bombs ('tumors'), Mirroring, failover, Cluttered APIs, dependency hell, Viruses, worms, Central Dogma, Binary patching aka 'Gene therapy', Bug Regression, Reed-Solomon codes: 'Forward Error Correction', Holy Code, Framing errors: start and stop bits, Massive multiprocessing: each cell is a universe, Self hosting & bootstrapping, The Makefile, Further reading.
http://ds9a.nl/amazing-dna/

714 30 free programming eBooks « citizen428.blog()
Since this post got quite popular I decided to incorporate some of the excellent suggestions posted in the comments, so this list now has more than 40 books in it. [UPDATED: 2010-10-12] Learning a new programming language always is fun and there are many great books legally available for free online. Here’s a selection of 30 of them: Lisp/Scheme: How to Desing Programs Interpreting Lisp (PDF, suggested by Gary Knott) Let Over Lambda On Lisp Practical Common Lisp Programming in Emacs Lisp Programming Languages. Application and Interpretation (suggested by Alex Ott) Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days Visual LISP Developer’s Bible (suggested by “skatterbrainz”) Ruby: Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Design Patterns in Ruby Learn to Program MacRuby: The Definitive Guide Mr. Neighborly’s Humble Little Ruby Book (suggested by @tundal45) Programming Ruby Read Ruby 1.9 Ruby Best Practices Ruby on Rails Tutorial Book (suggested by @tundal45) Javascript: Building iPhone Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Eloquent Javascript jQuery Fundamentals Mastering Node Haskell: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good Real World Haskell Erlang: Concurrent Programming in Erlang Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good Python: Dive into Python How to Think Like a Computer Scientist – Learning with Python Smalltalk: Dynamic Web Development with Seaside Pharo by Example (based on the next book in this list, suggested by Anonymous) Squeak by Example Misc: Algorithms The Art of Assembly Language Beginning Perl Building Accessible Websites (suggested by Joe Clark) The C Book C# Yellow Book (suggested by Joe Wyatt) Compiler Construction Dive Into HTML 5 (suggested by @til) Higher-Order Perl The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages (suggested by “Def”) An Introduction to R Learn Prolog Now! Objective-C 2.0 Essentials Programming Scala Of course there are many more free programming eBooks, but this list consists of the ones I read or want(ed) to read. This is far from comprehensive and languages that are completely missing are mostly left out on purpose (e.g. PHP, C++, Java). I’m sure somebody else made a list for them somewhere.
http://citizen428.net/archives/434

691 visualizing.org
Visualizing.org is a community of creative people working to make sense of complex issues through data and design
 and it’s a shared space and free resource to help you achieve this goal. Why Visualizing.org? By some estimates, we now create more data each year than in the entirety of prior human history. Data visualization helps us approach, interpret, and extract knowledge from this information. Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen government agencies, NGOs, and companies open up their data for the public to see and use. And we’ve seen data visualization figure more prominently in design curricula, conference programs, and the media. We created Visualizing.org because we want to help connect the proliferation of public data
 with a community that can help us understand this data
 with the general public. What is Visualizing.org? What can I do on the site? For designers: Visualizing is a place to showcase your work, get feedback, ensure that your work is seen by lots of people and gets used by teachers, journalists, and conference organizers to help educate the public about various world issues Visualizing is a free resource to search for data Use Visualizing to keep up with and be inspired by the latest work from other designers and design schools Learn about new visualization tools, blogs, books and other resources to help your work Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike License For teachers and schools: Visualizing is a place to exhibit the collective work of your students, organize assignments and class projects, and help your students find data for their own visualizations We’re working on new tools to help you share teaching material with other teachers As an Academic Partner, your students are eligible to participate in various design competitions – we’re hosting the first Visualizing Marathon in New York in October To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For bloggers and journalists: Visualizing is a resource to find data visualizations about a wide variety of world issues to inform and accompany your own reporting – and it’s easy to embed visualizations and widgets from Visualizing on your own site For conference organizers: As a Knowledge Partner, Visualizing allows you to use data visualizations at your conferences under a Creative Commons License To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For all: Visualizing is a new and fun online resource to learn more about the world in all its complexity and inter-dependence -- and become more comfortable with data and how it can be visually represented How does it work? The site is open and free to use. Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. Simply put, this means that anyone can share, copy, remix, or build upon the visualization as long as: (i) it is used non-commercially; and (ii) the visualization’s creator and source are credited.
http://www.visualizing.org/

685 100 Best Photoshop Tutorials of All Time that Yield Professional Results | CreativeFan
Photoshop tutorials are one of the most popular subjects on the web, as the digital art community continues to grow and new designers bring their unique skills. However, quality Photoshop tutorials that teach you a useful effect, have a quality finished result and are well explained are harder to find, and with the large number of tutorial sites available, it can be hard to sort the quality from the mundane. best photoshop tutorials
http://creativefan.com/101-best-photoshop-tutorials/

529 SynthesisWorkshops
synth modular Sound synthesis and sound design Music has brought pleasure and entertainment to mankind throughout the whole of history. Each person is by nature equipped with one of the most elaborate and emotional musical instruments; the human voice. Whenever people feel good music seems to fit the occasion, and it is considered quite natural to hum or sing a song. Musical instruments have brought their own moods to music and at the current moment in human evolution there is an enormous variety of musical instruments available. The twentieth century has seen the development of a range of new and exciting electronic musical instruments. These electronic instruments are very flexible, they can produce a wide range of timbres and can be amplified to whatever loudness level sounds best for the occasion. Most of these electronic instruments are played by a keyboard, but in essence the keyboard can be replaced by any electromechanical device that is able to transform a movement caused by a human interaction into an electrical signal that can drive the sound generating core of the electronic instrument. All sorts of technical and scientific developments have helped to create electronic instruments and the human interface to play them. Still, music is an art and not really a hard science, although music and sound have for a long time been subject to various scientific research. An important realization is that science can not really explain why much music is such a pleasure to listen to and such a joy to make. Which is not a bad thing, as probably no one is waiting for science to take the fun out of music by applying formalized rules and templates on what is also subject to ‘feel’. So, although this book covers techniques that lean heavily on scientific research, the application of these techniques will in general be aimed at creating fun. There are a lot of professionals working with sound and even more people that make music for their personal enjoyment. Mastery of sound synthesis is valuable to all of them. Still, it won’t be easy to please everyone with one single book, as some people will be more interested in how things work and others might want practical examples that just work. The aim of this book is that it can at least be used as a practical guide in workshops and courses in electronic music, covering some essential basics that are needed to operate the equipment used in sound synthesis in a way that makes some sense. Additionally it can be used to explore techniques to find out how they can help in the development of one’s own musical style. Sound synthesis is the art of creating sounds by using suitable electronic means, using either analog or digital electronic devices. Sound design is the art of creating particular sounds using sound synthesis techniques. The definition of sound design as used here might be confusing to some, as the name sound design is also used in the discipline in industrial design that occupies itself with how mass produced objects should sound. Examples are how the sound of cars or ladyshaves are ‘designed’ to sound pleasing while in use. Which of course has nothing to do at all with music or sound synthesizers. This book puts the emphasis on the various synthesis techniques for musical purposes and how to setup sound synthesizers to create a large range of characteristic musical sounds. The art of musical sound design is left to the artist.
http://www.xs4all.nl/~rhordijk/G2Pages/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality
” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

474 Why Intelligent People Fail
Why Intelligent People Fail Content from Sternberg, R. (1994). In search of the human mind. New York: Harcourt Brace. 1. Lack of motivation. A talent is irrelevant if a person is not motivated to use it. Motivation may be external (for example, social approval) or internal (satisfaction from a job well-done, for instance). External sources tend to be transient, while internal sources tend to produce more consistent performance. 2. Lack of impulse control. Habitual impulsiveness gets in the way of optimal performance. Some people do not bring their full intellectual resources to bear on a problem but go with the first solution that pops into their heads. 3. Lack of perserverance and perseveration. Some people give up too easily, while others are unable to stop even when the quest will clearly be fruitless. 4. Using the wrong abilities. People may not be using the right abilities for the tasks in which they are engaged. 5. Inability to translate thought into action. Some people seem buried in thought. They have good ideas but rarely seem able to do anything about them. 6. Lack of product orientation. Some people seem more concerned about the process than the result of activity. 7. Inability to complete tasks. For some people nothing ever draws to a close. Perhaps it’s fear of what they would do next or fear of becoming hopelessly enmeshed in detail. 8. Failure to initiate. Still others are unwilling or unable to initiate a project. It may be indecision or fear of commitment. 9. Fear of failure. People may not reach peak performance because they avoid the really important challenges in life. 10. Procrastination. Some people are unable to act without pressure. They may also look for little things to do in order to put off the big ones. 11. Misattribution of blame. Some people always blame themselves for even the slightest mishap. Some always blame others. 12. Excessive self-pity. Some people spend more time feeling sorry for themselves than expending the effort necessary to overcome the problem. 13. Excessive dependency. Some people expect others to do for them what they ought to be doing themselves. 14. Wallowing in personal difficulties. Some people let their personal difficulties interfere grossly with their work. During the course of life, one can expect some real joys and some real sorrows. Maintaining a proper perspective is often difficult. 15. Distractibility and lack of concentration. Even some very intelligent people have very short attention spans. 16. Spreading oneself too think or too thick. Undertaking too many activities may result in none being completed on time. Undertaking too few can also result in missed opportunities and reduced levels of accomplishment. 17. Inability to delay gratification. Some people reward themselves and are rewarded by others for finishing small tasks, while avoiding bigger tasks that would earn them larger rewards. 18. Inability to see the forest for the trees. Some people become obsessed with details and are either unwilling or unable to see or deal with the larger picture in the projects they undertake. 19. Lack of balance between critical, analytical thinking and creative, synthetic thinking. It is important for people to learn what kind of thinking is expected of them in each situation. 20. Too little or too much self-confidence. Lack of self-confidence can gnaw away at a person’s ability to get things done and become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Conversely, individuals with too much self-confidence may not know when to admit they are wrong or in need of self-improvement.
http://www.acceleratingfuture.com/michael/works/intelligentfailure.htm

433 The Beauty Of Typography: Writing Systems And Calligraphy, Part 2 - Smashing Magazine
The beauty of writing systems is that each has something unique from which to draw inspiration. Two weeks ago, in the first part of this article, we covered Arabic web design, magazine, html, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/22/the-beauty-of-typography-writing-systems-and-calligraphy-part-2/

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front 
 if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant DonnĂ©s, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

423 MACBETH STUDIO SYSTEMS
Welcome to MacBeth Synthesizers! LATEST NEWS: 20/07/09 please scroll down for infoOver the last year and half or so, more products have been developed. Work has gone into the design of a new modular synthesizer system shared by two formats- the 3U format and the 5U format. The designs are relatively new but still retain the inherant qualities of the M3X, M5 and M5N synthesizers. The system is called the X-Series Modular Synthesizer after the popular M3X and its protégé keyboard synthesizer the X-Factor. This fully analogue keyboard is still under serious development and there will be more information to follow on that one. As a refreshing change from making the large scale semi modular M5 and M5N, I am now delving into the production of smaller, free for all systems that will probably grow large! I'm taking into it all my experience of designing both large and small analogue synthesizers as well as a few new ideas too. Please take the time to look around this website. In each catagory there is product information, sounds, tracks and links to other related media on the internet. Currently the 3U X-Series Dual Oscillator and 'Backend' Filter Combo are in production. I expect delivery of the Dual Oscillator within the next two weeks- shortly after that the 'Backend' Filter Combo will roll out of production. Please contact any of the Distributers listed to get your modules. I intend to produce a short run of the 5U modules soon, so once again- stay tuned for that... ...anyway! I have uploaded quite a few demo sounds on here- maybe not to everyones taste- but at least they make you think of what these modules could do in the right hands, i.e. you! - after all- I'm an engineer, not a muscian as such!...Well you decide! All MacBeth Products are built to exacting standards- from materials selection to the physical build. The PCBs and Sheet Metalwork are fabricated by Zot Engineering from Musselburgh, Scotland http://www.zot.co.uk and final assembly is performed by Diatron Assembly Systems from Norwich, England http://www.diatron.co.uk Both companies also manufacture equipment for the medical, military and aerospace sectors of industrial engineering
http://www.macbethstudiosystems.com/

396 The Essential Guide to @font-face
This guide will teach you how to implement @font-face with cross-browser compatibility and will also look at a number of the supporting services that have arisen, making it even easier to use custom fonts in your web designs. font-face, tutorial, guide, css, google font api, typekit, font-face generator,css
http://sixrevisions.com/css/font-face-guide/

364 What every programmer should know about memory, Part 1 [LWN.net]
Editor's introduction: Ulrich Drepper recently approached us asking if we would be interested in publishing a lengthy document he had written on how memory and software interact. We did not have to look at the text for long to realize that it would be of interest to many LWN readers. Memory usage is often the determining factor in how software performs, but good information on how to avoid memory bottlenecks is hard to find. This series of articles should change that situation. The original document prints out at over 100 pages. We will be splitting it into about seven segments, each run 1-2 weeks after its predecessor. Once the entire series is out, Ulrich will be releasing the full text. Reformatting the text from the original LaTeX has been a bit of a challenge, but the results, hopefully, will be good. For ease of online reading, Ulrich's footnotes have been placed {inline in the text}. Hyperlinked cross-references (and [bibliography references]) will not be possible until the full series is published. Many thanks to Ulrich for allowing LWN to publish this material; we hope that it will lead to more memory-efficient software across our systems in the near future.
https://lwn.net/Articles/250967/

353 DIY music from outerspace
Welcome To MFOS, Your Synth-DIY Headquarters. What is synth-DIY? Synth-DIY is just what the name implies. Synthesizer Do It Yourself. Many people, like me, grew up in the dawn of the analog synthesizer age (Moog, ARP, Oberheim, Buchla, RCA, EMu, Fairlight, PAIA and many others) and although we may have really wanted our very own analog synthesizer with dozens of knobs and switches they were w-a-a-a-y out of our reach financially. Now many people with a modicum of electronic skills and a renewed interest in analog synthesizers are discovering that with a schematic, a PC board and some electronic components they can do it themselves!. MFOS' mission is to help people realize their synthesizer dreams. We do this by providing analog synthesizer projects with complete schematics, assembly drawings and professionally manufactured PC boards. If you already have electronic skills... welcome! If you would like to learn more about electronics or analog synthesizers then try these links: How can I start learning about electronics?, Analog Synth 101 and/or The MFOS Book Store. It's never to late to develop a new skill, reignite an old passion or exercise your creativity. Keep imagining, keep inventing, stay ingenious.
http://www.musicfromouterspace.com/analogsynth/synthdiy_links.html

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/01/alesis-andromeda-aurora.html

230 ctrlr - Project Hosting on Google Code
Standalone and VST versions for each controller completly integrates to any DAW with VST support Cross platform (Windows/MAC UB/Linux)
http://code.google.com/p/ctrlr/

213 All Design Patterns | Open Source Design Pattern Library
Fluid is an open-source software community Fluid builds user interfaces, designs commonly used interactions, teaches others how to build good user-centred designs, and works with other software projects to integrate our solutions into their applications.
http://uidesignpatterns.org/designPatterns/

205 CMS Experiment
CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid, CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, Physics, Particle, Particles, Laboratory, Science, Accelerators, Accelerator, Collider, Colliders, Large Hadron Collider, LHC, Experiments, outreach, CMS times, detector
http://cms.web.cern.ch/cms/

165 SQL Server Join Examples
I am new to SQL Server and want to learn about the JOIN options. What are all of the JOIN options in SQL Server? What is the significance of each of the options? I am a little confused on the differences and syntax, can you provide some examples and ex
http://www.mssqltips.com/tip.asp?tip=1667

135 all - dj accessories - Turntablelab.com
we started the Lab in 1998, our first year out of college. Turntable Lab was established in 1998 by Anthony Cattarina, Jasper Goggins, and Peter Hahn. The trio formed the idea for the Lab based on numerous negative experiences at stores that sold dj equipment: both big musical instrument chains and shady Canal Street stereo stores. Turned off by haggling, uninformed salesmen, and questionable product, Turntable Lab built its business on fair pricing, informed reviews, and a well researched selection of “Lab approved” items. Most of the Lab's employees are working djs / producers / musicians, which helps to ensure this high standard. The business model was an immediate success, establishing rapid growth and a dedicated customer base. Turntable Lab soon applied their business model to other areas including recorded music, production equipment, clothing, and books. Each expansion has been met with success, and today Turntable Lab is a recognized tastemaker in all those areas. To bring the Turntable Lab experience directly to consumers, Turntable Lab opened its first retail location in 2001. In December of 2005, Turntable opened its flagship store in Hollywood, California. Currently the Turntable Lab headquarters is located in Brooklyn, New York.
http://www.turntablelab.com/dj_equipment/42/2204/

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