100SILEX, de 0 100 s: faster
767 The 5 types of programmers « Steven Benner's Blog
In my code journeys and programming adventures I’ve encountered many strange foes, and even stranger allies. I’ve identified at least five different kinds of code warriors, some make for wonderful comrades in arms, while others seem to foil my every plan. However they all have their place in the pantheon of software development. Without a healthy mix of these different programming styles you’ll probably find your projects either take too long to complete, are not stable enough or are too perfect for humans to look upon. The duct tape programmer The code may not be pretty, but damnit, it works! This guy is the foundation of your company. When something goes wrong he will fix it fast and in a way that won’t break again. Of course he doesn’t care about how it looks, ease of use, or any of those other trivial concerns, but he will make it happen, without a bunch of talk or time-wasting nonsense. The best way to use this person is to point at a problem and walk away. The OCD perfectionist programmer You want to do what to my code? This guy doesn’t care about your deadlines or budgets, those are insignificant when compared to the art form that is programming. When you do finally receive the finished product you will have no option but submit to the stunning glory and radiant beauty of perfectly formatted, no, perfectly beautiful code, that is so efficient that anything you would want to do to it would do nothing but defame a masterpiece. He is the only one qualified to work on his code. The anti-programming programmer I’m a programmer, damnit. I don’t write code. His world has one simple truth; writing code is bad. If you have to write something then you’re doing it wrong. Someone else has already done the work so just use their code. He will tell you how much faster this development practice is, even though he takes as long or longer than the other programmers. But when you get the project it will only be 20 lines of actual code and will be very easy to read. It may not be very fast, efficient, or forward-compatible, but it will be done with the least effort required. The half-assed programmer What do you want? It works doesn’t it? The guy who couldn’t care less about quality, that’s someone elses job. He accomplishes the tasks that he’s asked to do, quickly. You may not like his work, the other programmers hate it, but management and the clients love it. As much pain as he will cause you in the future, he is single-handedly keeping your deadlines so you can’t scoff at it (no matter how much you want to). The theoretical programmer Well, that’s a possibility, but in practice this might be a better alternative. This guy is more interested the options than what should be done. He will spend 80% of his time staring blankly at his computer thinking up ways to accomplish a task, 15% of his time complaining about unreasonable deadlines, 4% of his time refining the options, and 1% of his time writing code. When you receive the final work it will always be accompanied by the phrase “if I had more time I could have done this the right way”. Where do you fit? Personally, I’d have to classify myself as the perfectionist. So, which type of programmer are you? Or perhaps you know another programming archetype that is missing from my list? Post a comment below and I’ll add it to a new updated list.
http://stevenbenner.com/2010/07/the-5-types-of-programmers/

675 9 Ways to Instantly Code Faster | Nettuts+
Doesn't the title say it all? There are a wide variety of tools and techniques which can drastically improve the speed at which we code. Particularly during code,code faster,coding tips,tips,tools
http://net.tutsplus.com/articles/general/9-ways-to-instantly-code-faster/

637 50 List of Free Online Photo Editing Tools | blueblots.com
Editing an image is very popular these days due to the innovation of graphic software programs that will allow us to create computer arts from scratch. However, we could also enhance, add some cool effects and customize the look of our images easily without having the need of these soft wares through the online photo editors. An online photo editor tool allows us to edit and manipulate a photo in the Web Browser. This is more advantageous compared to the softwares for editing an image as this could not consume much of the memory of your desktop and the processing is done faster by the server. With just a few clicks, we could now be able to customize our own photos, create funny photos from our pictures or even feature ourselves in a magazine cover like that of a celebrity. Here are the 50 List of Photo Editing Tools to Help You Edit Images and Photos Online for free. Try to check and get your best pick!
http://blueblots.com/tools/50-list-of-free-online-photo-editing-tools/

303 View topic - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D
Instruments - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:14 pm Post subject: Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D I've found this site: http://homepage.mac.com/s...ds_cs15mod.html I've made mod in my CS30 - faster LFO speed... anyway? I know circuit in cs30 is diffrent. anyway i was wonderin howto get 24db lopass? JarreYuri - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:05 pm I don't know... yet. But I just wanted to say that I would soooo much want to have that synth You have. Congratulations! Which version do You have? radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:22 pm I had 3 versions: - Yamaha CS30L - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 6 or 8 steps - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 1 to 8 steps sold first two
http://216.70.103.199/forum/printview.php?t=4294&start=0&sid=120d9a0ab733b5531ff4e0e0473aca14

210 What is your most productive shortcut with Vim? - Stack Overflow
I've heard a lot about Vim, both pros and cons. It really seems you should be (as a developer) faster with Vim than with any other editor. I'm using Vim to do some basic stuff and I'm at best 10 times less productive with Vim. The only two things you should care about when you talk about speed (you may not care enough about them, but you should) are: Using alternatively left and right hands is the fastest way to use the keyboard. Never touching the mouse is the second way to be as fast as possible. It takes ages for you to move your hand, grab the mouse, move it, and bring it back to the keyboard (and you often have to look at the keyboard to be sure you returned your hand properly to the right place) Here are two examples demonstrating why I'm far less productive with Vim.
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1218390/what-is-your-most-productive-shortcut-with-vim/1220118#1220118/

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