100SILEX, de 0 100 s: found
1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1176 CommunityWiki: Tags Vs Mnemonics
This page argues that “tags” as found in typical 2007 SocialBookmarking software should more properly called “mnemonics.” Then true “tags”, tags that are assigned in efforts to identify EmergentStructure, are introduced, and differentiated from mnemonics.
http://www.communitywiki.org/en/TagsVsMnemonics

1090 Nord Modular Index
Patches The Nord Modular patch archive. All patches ordered by author Patches catagorized by Kristof Middendorf Patches catagorized by 'sound' or 'style'. Most of these patches can also be found in the regular archive. Patches catagorized by Tony Smyth Patches catagorized by 'sound' or 'style'. Most of these patches can also be found in the regular archive. Patches zipped This folder holds the .ZIP-ed archives of the patches and interesting threads. These archives are updated every day, so all recent patches can be found here too. Interesting threads A growing collection of interesting articles from the Nord Modular mailing list. Workshops Workshops... Miscellaneous Here we keep everything that doesn't fit elsewhere Recent patches This folder contains patches that are extracted from the Nord Modular mailinglist automaticly. These files are not manually checked and might be broken, copyrighted or might contain doubles. Here you can find the latest patches only posted minutes ago ! FAQ FAQ stands for Frequently Asked Questions. Here you can find answers on subjects that arise frequently on the mailinglist.
http://nm-archives.electro-music.com/010_NordModular/

1066 EML Electrocomp 101
Electronic Music Labs (EML), based in Vernon, CT, was a rather strange but interesting outfit that, for a brief period in the early 1970s, had some success in the commercial synthesizer market. The company was founded and largely run by electrical engineers rather than musicians, an attribute with both strengths and weaknesses.
http://home.hiwaay.net/~cornutt/Music/Web%20Page/EML.html

814 Found Shit » Christmas : Funny, Bizarre, Amazing Pictures & Videos

http://www.foundshit.com/tag/christmas/

781 Atlas obscura
About the Atlas Obscura Welcome to the Atlas Obscura, a compendium of this age's wonders, curiosities, and esoterica. The Atlas Obscura is a collaborative project with the goal of cataloging all of the singular, eccentric, bizarre, fantastical, and strange out-of-the-way places that get left out of traditional travel guidebooks and are ignored by the average tourist. If you're looking for miniature cities, glass flowers, books bound in human skin, gigantic flaming holes in the ground, phallological museums, bone churches, balancing pagodas, or homes built entirely out of paper, the Atlas Obscura is where you'll find them. The Atlas Obscura is not just about collecting oddities. In an age where everything seems to have been explored and there is nothing new to be found, the Atlas Obscura celebrates a different way of traveling, and a different lens through which to view the world. The Atlas Obscura depends on our community of far-flung explorers to find and report back about the world's wonders and curiosities. If you have been to, know of, or have heard about a place that belongs in the Atlas Obscura, we want you to tell us about it. Anyone and everyone is welcome and encouraged to nominate places for inclusion, and to edit content already in the Atlas. Thanks for stopping by, and good exploring!
http://atlasobscura.com/globe/europe/france?page=3

767 The 5 types of programmers « Steven Benner's Blog
In my code journeys and programming adventures I’ve encountered many strange foes, and even stranger allies. I’ve identified at least five different kinds of code warriors, some make for wonderful comrades in arms, while others seem to foil my every plan. However they all have their place in the pantheon of software development. Without a healthy mix of these different programming styles you’ll probably find your projects either take too long to complete, are not stable enough or are too perfect for humans to look upon. The duct tape programmer The code may not be pretty, but damnit, it works! This guy is the foundation of your company. When something goes wrong he will fix it fast and in a way that won’t break again. Of course he doesn’t care about how it looks, ease of use, or any of those other trivial concerns, but he will make it happen, without a bunch of talk or time-wasting nonsense. The best way to use this person is to point at a problem and walk away. The OCD perfectionist programmer You want to do what to my code? This guy doesn’t care about your deadlines or budgets, those are insignificant when compared to the art form that is programming. When you do finally receive the finished product you will have no option but submit to the stunning glory and radiant beauty of perfectly formatted, no, perfectly beautiful code, that is so efficient that anything you would want to do to it would do nothing but defame a masterpiece. He is the only one qualified to work on his code. The anti-programming programmer I’m a programmer, damnit. I don’t write code. His world has one simple truth; writing code is bad. If you have to write something then you’re doing it wrong. Someone else has already done the work so just use their code. He will tell you how much faster this development practice is, even though he takes as long or longer than the other programmers. But when you get the project it will only be 20 lines of actual code and will be very easy to read. It may not be very fast, efficient, or forward-compatible, but it will be done with the least effort required. The half-assed programmer What do you want? It works doesn’t it? The guy who couldn’t care less about quality, that’s someone elses job. He accomplishes the tasks that he’s asked to do, quickly. You may not like his work, the other programmers hate it, but management and the clients love it. As much pain as he will cause you in the future, he is single-handedly keeping your deadlines so you can’t scoff at it (no matter how much you want to). The theoretical programmer Well, that’s a possibility, but in practice this might be a better alternative. This guy is more interested the options than what should be done. He will spend 80% of his time staring blankly at his computer thinking up ways to accomplish a task, 15% of his time complaining about unreasonable deadlines, 4% of his time refining the options, and 1% of his time writing code. When you receive the final work it will always be accompanied by the phrase “if I had more time I could have done this the right way”. Where do you fit? Personally, I’d have to classify myself as the perfectionist. So, which type of programmer are you? Or perhaps you know another programming archetype that is missing from my list? Post a comment below and I’ll add it to a new updated list.
http://stevenbenner.com/2010/07/the-5-types-of-programmers/

748 30 Examples of Big Backgrounds in Web Design | Inspiration
This week we decided to gather a selection of Big Backgrounds in web design and to be honest I thought that I will find way more great examples that I actually found. I mean, as you will see here, that are plenty of nice examples of websites that use photography as their backgrounds, their 'big images backgrounds'. inspiration,web design
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/30-examples-of-big-backgrounds-in-web-design/

746 40 Essential CSS Templates, Resources and Downloads | Speckyboy Design Magazine
Every web developer should have in their toolbox a collection of CSS tools and resources like the ones outlined in this article. A set of techniques that you rely on and that are always at the ready to cover any possible eventuality. You will find not a selection of the latest innovative CSS techniques (there are some) in this article, merely a collection of tools, resources and downloads that can be used by web designers for solutions to everyday CSS design and coding solutions. The resources below have been split into four categories: CSS Download Packages (all of the CSS resources offer multiple variations of each technique), Downloadable CSS Tools (the resources within this category offers specialized templates), Web, Mobile & Form Frameworks (+ tools and templates to help you get started with each); Feature-Rich and Outstanding Mobile & Web Templates and finally, a selection of tools to help with cross browser compatibility. We don’t presume that this is an ultimate collection, merely a selection of resources we have found to be indispensable. We are positive we have missed a few, and would love to hear about the tools and resources you rely upon.
http://speckyboy.com/2010/11/08/40-essential-css-templates-resources-and-downloads/

727 How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect | Apartment Therapy DC
How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect Mclain Wiesand, a Baltimore-based custom furniture company, has made a name for itself by producing handcrafted pieces that capture the feel of real antiques. One of the techniques they use for aging mirror is wonderfully simple and serves as the inspiration for this how to. Creating an antique mirror effect is an inexpensive way to revamp a flea market find, or add a new layer of interest and depth to an ordinary wall mirror. Almost any type of mirror can be aged using this technique, including mirrored plexiglass. Supplies • Mirrored glass or plexiglass. Due to the type of paint applied to the reflective coating, inexpensive, craft-store mirror works wonderfully. • Latex or other gloves for hand protection. • Paint stripper. Most types work fine. For a less toxic product, Citristrip works well. • Plastic putty spreader or putty knife. • Modern Masters Metal Effects Black Patina. This patina solution is essentially an acid that eats at the reflective surface of the mirror. There are probably other products that work similarly, but Modern Masters products work well and can be found online or in most art supply stores or specialty paint stores. • 1” chip brush (or similar brush). • Silver paint of choice. Steps Step 1: (Image 2, above) Wearing gloves, place mirror face down on cardboard or other protected surface in a well-ventilated area. Apply stripper generously to back of mirror and allow to sit for a few hours, or until paint can be easily removed with plastic scraper. It is not necessary for all of the paint to be removed; generally speaking, 80-90% should suffice. When paint has been stripped, wash mirror with soap and water and allow to dry. Step 2: (Images 3 & 4) Place stripped mirror face down on clean cardboard or other protected surface. Dip chip brush in Modern Masters Metal Patina Solution and gradually apply it to the raw reflective surface of the mirror. As mirror tends to age from the edges inward, it is best to apply patina solution in heavier amounts around the edges of the mirror. In a matter of minutes (or less), the patina solution will begin to eat away at the reflective surface. Other application techniques that produce nice effects are spattering and light directional brushing of patina solution. Continue applying solution until desired level of ageing is achieved. Rinse with water to neutralize the reaction and allow to dry. Step 3: (photos 5 & 6) This next step involves reapplying paint to the back of the mirror. The color paint you choose will be visible through the spots created by the patina solution. The dark areas of aged antique mirrors tend to be a dark silver-grey but depending on the silvering technique used, can range from gold to pale silver to black. One method that produced nice results is a combination of dark and light silver paints, applied randomly (per images). Apply paint until the reflective surface is completely covered.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/how-to/how-to-create-an-antique-mirror-effect-127227

687 50 Beautiful and Fresh Free Fonts
As you will already know, there are thousands upon thousands of free fonts available, so choosing that perfect font can be very, very difficult. Its tedious business constantly scouring through countless font directories and foundries to hopefully find what you are looking for. Hopefully, with this post, we can make your search that little bit easier by rounding up 50 of our favorite fonts that have been released in recent months. So, whether you design web pages, t-shirts, posters or just seeking some typographical inspiration, we have no doubt that you will the perfect font for your perfect project in this round-up. Please note, licenses to have a tendency to change so please double check before usage.
http://speckyboy.com/2010/10/03/50-beautiful-and-fresh-free-fonts/

679 Trevor Marshall's ETI3600, ETI4600 International Music Synthesisers and Maplin 3800 and Maplin 5600s Stereo Synthesisers
Many years ago the Australian magazine "Electronics Today International" published my designs for two partly digital, mostly analog, Electronic Music Synthesisers. the ETI 3600 and ETI 4600. Both were made available as kits of components Barry Wilkinson at ETI was responsible for the final packaging and kitting coordination. Maplin Electronics Ltd.(in the UK) subsequently picked up the designs, which they marketed as as the Maplin models 3800 and 5600s Electronic Music Synthesisers At the time I held two Australian provisional patents for the technologies I used in the Synthesiser designs. One related to the method for generating sawtooth waveforms, the other was for the method of using commutated resistors in voltage controlled filters. I never made any money out of the designs, or the patents, which have long ago been allowed to lapse. But it was fun! The original constructional articles for the ETI 3600/4600 can be found in these PDFs: October 1973, December 1973, January 1974, Feb 1974, March 1974, April 1974, July 1974, March 1975, April 1975, May 1975, August 1975 Although the earliest (4004) microprocessors were available at that time, it was not until the late-70's that I first started programming fully digital (Signetics 2650 based) Microcomputer systems. Consequently my early digital designs were hardware, and not firmware, based. Of course, these days, everything in my hardware and firmware is based on software designs - even the interconnections are controlled by the software in the EPLDs and PALs, instead of by wires. So many things have changed over the years.... Here is a mug shot of the Maplin 3800:
http://www.trevormarshall.com/eti.htm

641 redvoid - musician, producer, dj, & electronica modular synthesist
recording artist redvoid, of defcon6, beyond and back, window seat, and founder of ghostcone distribution - a dj, producer, blogger and holistic human music, tech, ideas, analog, eurorack, modular, synthesis, electro, \indie dance\, \nu disco\, house, dj, electronica, edm, dub, dubstep, fidget, idm, ambient, musician, artist, producer, remixer, controllerist, \rhino cubes\, \beat kangz\, ableton, \digital dj\, \music business\, youlicense
http://www.redvoidmusic.com/blog/

610 . � ��'�i|�,_ � ��'�i|�,_ . welcome @ deep!sonic � ��'�i|�,_ . � ��'�i|�,_ .
.:[ Hello Electromusic Lovers ! ]:. Es ist gelogen, dass Videogames Kids beeinflussen. Hätte PAC MAN das getan, würden wir heute durch dunkle Räume irren, Pillen fressen und elektronische Musik hören! (Christian Wilson, Nintendo Inc., 1989) In deep!sonic i primary show my musican side in my life. More and more also people come here to watch the balance in my life - photography in nature. I like the world wide web and found lot of information and answers. Because this i feel better to give a little bit back and presents my works here in deep!sonic. But more i think it's important to feel and life culture with all kinds.
http://www.deepsonic.ch/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

405 AudioLemon: HOWTO: Build A Steampunk Oscilloscope
AudioLemon is a blog that looks at all things audio related. Synths, samplers, software, effects and a little bit of electronic music and culture. A steampunk oscilloscope built by Andrew Smith from parts found in a junk box. "Although not intended to be fully functional it does actually work." It's looks so cute... if you have the DIY skills you can read an article over on electronicsweekly detailing the build, components used and a schematic. "I discovered that I had a really cute little 7cm CRT in the loft, together with several other valves of different types, and it seemed a good idea to make something decorative with them. For me, a lot of the charm of this piece resides in the unconventional layout and design, using a polished wooden box instead of the more usual metal chassis."
http://audiolemon.blogspot.com/2007/10/howto-build-steampunk-oscilloscope.html

376 Foobar2000:Title Formatting Reference - Hydrogenaudio Knowledgebase
This article contains information about built-in titleformatting functions and field references with special meaning. References to documentation about fields and function which can only be used in specific components or which are provided by specific components can be found at the end of this article. A field reference is a field name enclosed in percent signs, for example %artist%. A function call starts with a dollar sign, followed by the function name and the parameter list. A parameter list can either be empty - denoted as () - or contain one or more parameters separated by commata, for example $abbr(%artist%). Note that there must be no whitespace between the dollar sign and the function name, or the function name and the opening parenthesis of the parameter list. Please see Title Formatting Introduction for a presentation of titleformat syntax in general. For details of the query syntax, which uses these fields, see: Query Syntax.
http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=Foobar2000:Titleformat_Reference

327 ReclaimPrivacy.org | Facebook Privacy Scanner
Get Informed Keep up with the latest news about privacy policies on Facebook. The Erosion of Facebook Privacy eff.org Facebook Privacy Changes eff.org 7 Things to Stop Doing Now on Facebook yahoo.com Facebook's Gone Rogue wired.com Get Protected This website provides an independent and open tool for scanning your Facebook privacy settings. The source code and its development will always remain open and transparent. Drag this link to your web browser bookmarks bar: Scan for Privacy Go to your Facebook privacy settings and then click that bookmark once you are on Facebook. You will see a series of privacy scans that inspect your privacy settings and warn you about settings that might be unexpectedly public. Follow us on Facebook to hear about the latest updates. Having trouble? Check our help page for tips and video walkthroughs. Get Involved Our mission is to promote privacy awareness on Facebook and elsewhere. Spread awareness to your friends on Facebook by sharing this website with them: Share 128K You can follow us on Twitter too! If you prefer email, you can also sign up for the newsletter to get informed of privacy updates: email: Are you a coder? Contribute to the source code and help to keep the privacy scanner up-to-date. Read Our Own Privacy Policy Our privacy policy is not long: we never see your Facebook data we never share your personal information Simple. The scanner operates entirely within your own browser. Statement of limitation of liability: you use this tool at your own risk, and by using this tool you agree to hold neither ReclaimPrivacy.org (nor its contributors) liable for damage to your Facebook account. However, we do strive to reduce that risk by keeping the source code open and transparent, so that we can identify bugs and quickly fix any functionality. about the author I am an avid Javascript developer and co-founder at Olark (check it out!). You can chat with me about ReclaimPrivacy.org on my website.
http://www.reclaimprivacy.org/

304 electro-music.com :: View topic - Yamaha CS30 full 24db modification?
I've found CS15 modification guide http://homepage.mac.com/synth_seal/html/ds_cs15mod.html Found some similarities with cs30 and did LFO mod. Still I'm curious how to make this full 24db mod in CS30? Anyone?
http://electro-music.com/forum/topic-37286.html

303 View topic - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D
Instruments - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:14 pm Post subject: Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D I've found this site: http://homepage.mac.com/s...ds_cs15mod.html I've made mod in my CS30 - faster LFO speed... anyway? I know circuit in cs30 is diffrent. anyway i was wonderin howto get 24db lopass? JarreYuri - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:05 pm I don't know... yet. But I just wanted to say that I would soooo much want to have that synth You have. Congratulations! Which version do You have? radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:22 pm I had 3 versions: - Yamaha CS30L - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 6 or 8 steps - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 1 to 8 steps sold first two
http://216.70.103.199/forum/printview.php?t=4294&start=0&sid=120d9a0ab733b5531ff4e0e0473aca14

273 How to be a Programmer: A Short, Comprehensive, and Personal Summary
How to be a Programmer: A Short, Comprehensive, and Personal Summary Robert L Read Copyright 2002, 2003 Robert L. Read Copyright Copyright 2002, 2003 by Robert L. Read. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with one Invariant Section being ‘History (As of February, 2003)’, no Front-Cover Texts, and one Back-Cover Text: ‘The original version of this document was written by Robert L. Read without renumeration and dedicated to the programmers of Hire.com.’ A copy of the license is included in the section entitled ‘GNU Free Documentation License’. 2002
http://samizdat.mines.edu/howto/HowToBeAProgrammer.html

263 Facebook's Eroding Privacy Policy: A Timeline | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Since its incorporation just over five years ago, Facebook has undergone a remarkable transformation. When it started, it was a private space for communication with a group of your choice. Soon, it transformed into a platform where much of your infor...
http://w2.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/facebook-timeline/

258 SEOmoz | 30 SEO Problems & the Tools to Solve Them (Part 2 of 2)
Last November, I authored a popular post on SEOmoz detailing 15 SEO Problems and the Tools to Solve Them. It focused on a number of free tools and SEOmoz PRO tools. Today, I'm finishing up that project with a stab at another set of thorny issues that continually confound SEOs and how some new ...
http://www.seomoz.org/blog/30-seo-problems-the-tools-to-solve-them-part-2

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/01/alesis-andromeda-aurora.html

228 Solargraphs - How to create 6 month exposures.
Please have a look at Tarja Trygg's www.solargraphy.com for more examples. Much of pinhole photography relates to the use of time and being creative with the light from the sun, similar wonders to that found in astronomy. A 6-month exposure will enable you to image the arc of the sun as it rises or sinks throughout 6 months of the year. As well as this you will get some foreground detail and a camera to look at with awe as a small hole etches its 6-month exposure from your window ledge, garden shed, lamp post, tree etc. Being able to capture a period of time far beyond our own vision is incredible enough, but even more amazing is how simple it is to do. The final camera gives an extreme wide angle of view of 160 degrees.
http://www.pinholephotography.org/Solargraph%20instructions.htm

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