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1522 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader
secure tt-rss, tt-rss security 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader July 27, 2015 by Anand Leave a Comment secure-tt-rss-ft Share: share htpcBeginner We recently presented Tiny Tiny RSS to you as a great alternative to Google reader, which is one more way you can extend the functionality of your home server or your hosting space. Hopefully, you already exported your data from Google Reader. In this post, we will show you how to secure TT-RSS reader to prevent unauthorized access. Tiny Tiny RSS is an open source web-based news feed (RSS/Atom) reader and aggregator, designed to allow you to read news from any location, while feeling as close to a real desktop application as possible. As we previously explained, it makes an ideal candidate to replace Google Reader. While there are services like Feedly and Newsblur grabbing the crowd Google Reader, which some of you may prefer, there are a group of people who would like to run a RSS reader on their own server and keep things private. Assuming that you have already installed Tiny Tiny RSS on your alternative to Google reader or hosting space, we will now show you how to secure TT-RSS reader. Secure TT-RSS Reader One of the main reasons to move to an RSS aggregator like TT-RSS is maintaining your privacy. So if you do not secure TT-RSS reader well you are not only making your data available public but also making your system vulnerable to potential attacks. Choosing a strong username and password while setting your TT-RSS is the first basic thing that you can do to secure TT-RSS reader. Listed below are few more ways you can increase TT-RSS reader’s security. 1. Rename TT-RSS Folder One of the first lines of defense is to not use tt-rss in your URL to access your TT-RSS reader. To do this on your hosting account, use a folder name other than tt-rss while installing TT-RSS. On your Linux home server, edit /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf and change the first /tt-rss to something else. An example is shown below. TT-RSS Rename URL TT-RSS Rename URL After making the change, restart your TT-RSS and Apache to apply the changes: sudo service tt-rss restart sudo serivce apache2 reload Your TT-RSS reader is now available through the new URL (example: http://mydomain.com/myreader) only. Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 2. Enable SSL Accessing TT-RSS through http sends all information as unencrypted data. This could mean less privacy due to potential sniffing. The solution is to encrypt the data during transfer, which makes sniffing by hackers harder. To enable and enforce HTTPS access on Linux servers with Apache, install the following run-time libraries: sudo apt-get install libssl0.9.8 libpam0g openssl Restart your Apache server as shown above. You should now be able to access your TT-RSS reader with HTTPS. Note that you may have to have a SSL certificate generated. Refer to Apache documentation if you want to generate your own certificate. By default, the system will install self-signed certificates for you. These certificates are likely to raise warnings when you point your browser to the site. 3. Disable Single User Mode By default the single user mode is already disabled (in /etc/tt-rss/config.php). Enabling single user mode will also disable TT-RSS login system. Therefore, keep the single user mode disabled. Disable Single User Mode Disable Single User Mode A better way to make it a single user system is by limiting the number of registrations to 1 as described below. For whatever reason, you still want to enable single user mode, make sure you implement Apache Authentication method described below. 4. Self Registrations Self registrations allow a visitor to register themselves, which could reduce TT-RSS security. If your TT-RSS will be for personal use only, then you may want to disable user registration by setting “ENABLE_REGISTRATION” to “false”. TT-RSS Self Registrations TT-RSS Self Registrations To further secure TT-RSS Reader, uou may also want to change “REG_MAX_USERS” to “1” to make your account the only account on TT-RSS. asus n66uASUS RT-N66U Dual-Band Wireless-N900 Gigabit Router asus n66u reviewsFind out why it is rated the best wireless router in its class. 5. Apache Authentication Last but not the least, enable Authentication. This is even more important if you have enabled “Single User Mode” describe above. Every time you access TT-RSS, you will be asked for a username and password as shown in the picture below: Secure TT-RSS Reader On your hosting account this equivalent to password protecting a directory, in this case the TT-RSS directory. To do this on your Ubuntu server, you will have to create a .htpasswd file. More information is available in Apache documentation. But the easiest way to achieve this is to use one of the htpasswd generators available online. After you enter the username and password two code blocks will be generated. Copy the contents of the .htpasswd code block and save it to /etc/apache2/.htpasswd_ttrss. Next, copy the contents of the .htaccess code block and add it to /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf as shown below: TT-RSS Apache Authentication TT-RSS Apache Authentication Save and exit. Restart both TT-RSS and Apache previous shown above. You should be prompted for a password every time you try to access TT-RSS. Some may think that this double authentication method is an extra inconvenience. But I would rather be safe than sorry. Go ahead, secure Tiny Tiny RSS Reader and enjoy reading articles on your private secure RSS Reader.
http://www.htpcbeginner.com/secure-tt-rss-reader/

1517 THE MUTANT MACHINE Dynamic Analog Percussion Engine
MICROCONTROLLER FREE ANALOG PERCUSSION SYNTHESIS unique Inverter Core oscillators form the MEMBRANE. Each analog oscillator has three waveforms to select from capable of synthesizing everything from heavy-hitting bassdrums to classic 909-style snares and other complex timbres modular design gives the Machine many auxiliary purposes, great for modular sound design of many varieties, and not just percussion the SNAPPY section is comprised of a voltage controlled noise oscillator, for modelling the noisy part of drum timbres both MEMBRANE and SNAPPY elements have an external input for replacing the built-in sound sources, opening up many avenues of possibility 13 control voltage and audio inputs, for a fully modular drum experience 7 audio and CV/gate outputs for maximum integration with other modules dedicated outputs for each WAVE and NOISE oscillator mean you can use the Machine as a complex VCO in your system, when not synthesizing percussion WAVEFORM SCANNING FEATURE GENERATES COMPLEX TIMBRES the MEMBRANE’s waveforms can be scanned through automatically by the wavescanner’s voltage controlled clock generator, or an external clock or VCO can be used SCAN FREQ CV forms a unique form of timbre control, making the Machine act like a complex oscillator at its WAVES output the ENABLE input allows you to gate the wavescanner on and off with a CV or gate signal ARCHITECTURE OF THE MACHINE The Mutant Machine is a dynamic analog instrument capable of generating a wide palette of sounds, ranging from various forms of analog percussion to complex drones and oscillations. To achieve this, the Machine features two synthesis sections which are summed together at the final output: MEMBRANE and SNAPPY. Like the other Mutant Drums, the MEMBRANE and SNAPPY circuits began their mutation as classic analog percussion techniques and have been reimagined for 21st century modular synthesis. The MEMBRANE forms the main body of the sound by way of two analog VCOs, and the SNAPPY section further adds to the timbre by contributing noisy elements to the mix. A noisy CLICK which occurs at the beginning of the SNAPPY sound can have its volume adjusted independent of the main decaying SNAPPY texture. The waveforms which make up the MEMBRANE can be selected manually by button press, or the WAVESCANNER can be used to automatically scan through the available analog waveforms. By modulating the frequency through which waves are scanned, unique, complex sounds are created. Experimentation is encouraged by the many modulation inputs and outputs available to you. The Machine features 8 CV and gate inputs for modulation as well as two external audio inputs, for bringing other modules into the Machine’s core. There are many audio outputs for maximum versatility, allowing you to use the Machine to create drones and alien timbres for use elsewhere in the modular analog system.
http://www.hexinverter.net/mutant-machine

1502 Phone-Reluctant Introverts, There is Nothing Wrong With You
As I sit down to write this blog post there is the dreaded sound of a prolonged vibration as my phone skids, bouncing and sporadically across my desk. This is perfectly ideal and ironic distraction that actually befits the very thing I am thinking about and from which it is distracting me… Itself! I have always had an absolute detest for talking on the phone. And I’ll say now that it has nothing whatsoever to do with the person at the other end, I just find it a horrible tool for communicating with. Phone Box I think I probably am, and always have been worse than most people when it comes to using the phone (in the traditional sense, ie speaking to people) but if you can identify with any of this then read on. If you’re thinking, “what are you on about, I love the phone” then you’ll probably just get confused, but if you also have friends who ‘never answer the phone’ then this might help you to understand them a bit better. I can’t sum it up any better than Sophia Dembling in her article, 9 Signs that You Might Be an Introvert:
http://www.sheepdressedlikewolves.com/phone-reluctant-introvert/

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1255 Sony Cassette Walkman Overview (1979 - 2003) - sonyvintage.com
Unofficial SONY vintage page Skip to content Home Personal Audio HiFi about sonyvintage.com My Collection ← Sony WM-WE1 (1997) Cassette Walkman 1979 → Sony Cassette Walkman Overview (1979 – 2003) Posted on February 18, 2012 by Quo TPS-L2 WM-2 WM-3 WM-3Ex WM-R2 WM-F2 WM-D6 WM-7 WM-DD WM-F5 WM-20 WM-F20 WM-DC2 WM-D6C WM-DDII WM-F15 WM-R15 WM-30 WM-F30 WM-40 WM-75 WM-F75 WM-F55 WM-55 WM-W800 WM-R55 WM-F85 WM-101 WM-F101 WM-F202 WM-R202 WM-F60 WM-57 WM-60 WM-F107 WM-D3 WM-109 WM-F109 WM-101 WM-102 WM-104 WM-F203 WM-51 WM-51 with radio WM-501 WM-504 WM-503 WM-509 WM-550C WM-52 WM-505 WM-701C WM-F701C WM-506 WM-F506 WM-F606 WM-609 WM-170/171/172 WM-F180 WM-F181 WM-607 WM-DD9 WM-R707 WM-F707 WM-702 WM-F702 WM-703C WM-507 WM-F507 WM-600 WM-190 WM-805 WM-EX80 WM-EX60 WM-EX70 WM-FX70 WM-EX85 WM-FX85 WM-EX90 WM-SX77 WM-WX88 WM-GX90 WM-EX88 WM-EX77 WM-FX77 WM-DX100 WM-EX78 WM-RX77 WM-EX66 WM-EX909 WM-GX77 WM-FX909 WM-EX707 WM-FX707 WM-FX505 WM-WX808 WM-EX606 WM-EX808/808HG WM-FX808 WM-GX707 WM-RX707 WM-EX999 WM-FX999 WM-EX777 WM-FX777 WM-EX555 WM-WX777 WM-EX666 WM-EX1・EX1HG WM-FX1 WM-EX511 WM-FX811 WM-EX911 WM-EX811 WM-GX711 WM-EJ95 WM-WX1 WM-GX312 WM-EX2 WM-FX2 WM-EX622 WM-FX822 WM-EQ2 WM-GX622 WM-EX922 WM-GX822 WM-RX822 WM-EX633 WM-EX641 WM-EX5 WM-FX5 WM-EX3 WM-FX833 WM-GX322 WM-MV1 WM-GX622 WM-GX655 WM-EQ3 WM-FX855 WM-WE1 WM-WE7 WM-FS1 WM-EX655 WM-EX7 WM-EQ5 WM-FK2 WM-EK1 WM-EQ9 WM-EX9 WM-EX677 WM-GX677 WM-FX877 WM-WE01 WM-FK5 WM-EK3 WM-EX20 WM-EX900 WM-EX600 WM-GX323 WM-GX200 WM-FX200 WM-EX2000 WM-EX910 WM-EX610 WM-EX615 WM-GX688 WM-GX400 WM-EX921 WM-EX621 WM-FX888 WM-EX631 WM-FX202 WM-GX202 WM-GX788 +22 0 This entry was posted in Cassette Walkman. Bookmark the permalink. ← Sony WM-WE1 (1997) Cassette Walkman 1979 → Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website Comment You may use these HTML tags and attributes:
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http://www.sonyvintage.com/?p=1034

1254 SONY TC-D5 Pro II, an impressive machine
Hi there, I received yesterday a SONT TC-D5 Pro II. I have seen it in photos and read comments about its quality, similar to the D6C. I liked so much the design with the two VU meters, and it seemed to me that it belongs to an era when build quality was driven by other rules.
http://www.stereo2go.com/displayForumTopic/content/284032791466040094?reply=288255372213350915

1203 Opentape
Opentape is a free, open-source package that lets you make and host your own mixtapes on the web. Upload songs (via web or FTP), reorder, rename, customize the style, and share what you like on other sites with an embeddable player.
http://opentape.fm/

1132 Mammoth Modular Synthesizer At MIT Museum
Just got an update from Joe Paradiso on his homebuilt mammoth analog modular synthesizer. He’s installed it in the MIT Museum and has completed a fairly epic patch which you can listen to (24 hours a day!) here. Joe will be at the museum this Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm, demoing the synth to visitors, so be sure to stop by if you’re in the neighborhood. Here’s some info from Joe on the construction and inspiration for the latest patch. The second patch I made at the MIT Museum is totally done now, and you can hear it live on the stream. Listen to it at http://synth.media.mit.edu, and let me know what you think if you’re inclined – it’s running in physical space in Quad, of course – stereo on the stream. Note that this one has absolutely NO sequencer of any sort on it – all of the patterns you hear were made entirely from hand-patched logic (counters, ands, ors, flip flops, ring counters, rate multipliers, etc.). It’s an entirely different kind of composition environment from the norm – you really need to simultaneously be an engineer while being an artist and something of a performer. The inspiration for this patch started with the Boredoms – if you don’t know who they are, you should (http://www.boredoms.jp/). In particular, I was thinking of SuperRoots 9. The beauty of the patching interface is that you can never exactly nail what you start out to attain, but on the other hand, you get drawn into places you wouldn’t have normally gone once you start. The 3 drummers that Yamantaka Eye performs with lay down a compelling rhythm that my hand-patched logic and analog processing can’t match, of course. But this patch definitely has a strange jumpy groove once it gets into gear, and the 2-chord pad is archetypical too. Yes, Boredoms rule today! BTW, this patch took every cord I had, plus a good 30 more wires just shoved into the pin jacks – check out the photos here and here – the latter shows the kind of logic section patching complexity you need to build a sonic environment like this one. I’m ripping this baby out next Thursday, as I’ll be at the museum next Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm to demonstrate the synthesizer to visitors – doing some very simple patches and showing off what the modules do in case anybody is interested in this. It will run continuously until then. Otherwise, enjoy the stream – there are moments of introspective drift in-between wild percussion (yes, Boredoms!). I might pull the percussion line back so it doesn’t come so often or regularly, but it’s essentially a wrap.
http://synth.media.mit.edu/

1128 Venetian Snares on bandcamp
Venetian Snares My name is Aaron. Affectionate, released 11 January 2012 1. Seqsy 2. Lesbians2 3. Chordate 4. Lesbians1 It's my birthday. Here are four nice trax from my collection. Been listening to these often, I like the way they make me feel.
http://venetiansnares.bandcamp.com/

1078 The Modular Synth
A long time ago, in a galaxy far away, before your local music shop was packed with the latest digital synths, even before the early analogue monosynths, if you wanted a synthesizer you had to make it yourself. Modular synthesis is not in itself a different type of synthesis, but refers to the fact that a synth would be built up from individual components (modules) , which would be linked together (patched) in a configuration decided by the person doing the building. Compared with today's 'plug and play' synths which come with 100's of presets, GM soundsets, etc, this has the obvious disadvantage that 'recalling' a preset can only be done if your synth is patched together in exactly the same way every time and every controller has to be manually set to the same parameter. However, the big advantage of Modular synthesis, of course, is that, providing you have the right components, you can build practically anything you want, without being constrained by the 'hardwired' configurations of modern factory built synthesizers. The Pulsar/Scope Modular synth, like any other Modular 'soft synth' brings together the advantages of both Modular synths and modern factory built synths. Modular configurations can be saved as patches for total recall later on, and each patch can contain any number of presets, again for later recall. Furthermore, with a software modular, you can re-use each component as many times as you wish within one patch, you never run out of cables, you don't have to dedicate a whole room to the synth and the modules never suffer from physical damage. What's more, each parameter can be controlled by MIDI so parameter changes can be recorded into your sequencer in real-time.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/themodularsynth.shtml

1056 über x0xSh0p.de
XOXBOX the x0xSh0p offers everything you need to construct your own x0xb0x. begun with the simple transistor, over really rare components like the AN6562 OP Amp, or the very rare 2SC1583 transistor those your x0xb0x to that make what it represents them later: the best 303 replica in the world! on the following pages you’ll find informations about the old TB-303 and naturally to the x0xb0x… therefore you’re finally here!
http://www.x0xsh0p.de/

1029 ‪5 things I like about Vermona Perfourmer‬‏
http://CL516.BLOGSPOT.COM analog, synth, Vermona, Perfourmer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l17LVAWsfNg&feature=player_embedded

1014 Nord Modular Tips & Tricks
synth clavia Nord Modular & Micro Modular V3.03 tips & tricks Welcome to the Nord Modular and Micro Modular 'tips and tricks' section! The workshops of this section are created by a very skilled Nord Modular user: Rob Hordijk. On the 'tips and tricks' pages you will find various information regarding sound synthesis techniques. With every topic comes a workshop where you can follow the practical, non-mathematical, musician-oriented examples. The patches are kept as simple as possible showing only the basic connections. So it's up to you to color the tone to your liking, add modulation, etc., thus turning them into musically useful patches. Occasionally there might be a 'professional' patch as a bonus. If you have a Nord Modular or Nord MicroModular synthesizer you can download the example patches directly from the workshops into the Modular Editor V3.03 program and your synth and play with them. Just click on the patch image to download the actual patch to your Modular. If you do not have a Nord Modular you can download the Modular Editor V3.03 software here and check out the patches visually. Another very skilled Nord Modular/G2 user - Roland Kuit - has made the E-Book "SoundLab". This book covers synthesis techniques from A-Z, history of electronic music and composing techniques. For more info about the SoundLab E-Book, please visit: http://rolandkuit.blogspot.com/Topics available: Basics of sound synthesis on the Nord Modular This extensive section describes the basics of synthesis. (By Rob Hordijk) Basic synthesis Oscillator synchronisation This topic covers hardsync, softsync, FM-sync and VOSIM, a special application of sync. (By Rob Hordijk) Sync workshop Frequency Modulation This topic covers different types of FM, like linear FM, Phase Modulation and fixed formant FM. (By Rob Hordijk) FM Workshop Using the delay module It's too short for echos, but it's a valuable tool that can be used in a variety of ways, creating both sound effects as well as physical models of plucked string sounds and resonant bodies. (By Rob Hordijk) Delay Module Workshop Using logic modules Mastering those yellow connections. (By Rob Hordijk) Logic Workshop
http://www.clavia.se/nordmodular/Modularzone/index.html#SyncWorkshop

1013 Quotables stories - Lifehacker
Procrastination is like a credit card: it's a lot of fun until you get the bill Lifehacker, tips and downloads for getting things done Quotables stories - Lifehacker, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/quotables

962 25 Abandoned Soviet Monuments that look like they're from the Future | Crack Two
These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where WWII battles took place (like Tjentište, Kozara and Kadinjača), or where concentration camps stood (like Jasenovac and Niš). They were designed by different sculptors (Dušan Džamonja, Vojin Bakić, Miodrag Živković, Jordan and Iskra Grabul, to name a few) and architects (Bogdan Bogdanović, Gradimir Medaković...), conveying powerful visual impact to show the confidence and strength of the Socialist Republic. In the 1980s, these monuments attracted millions of visitors per year, especially young pioneers for their "patriotic education." After the Republic dissolved in early 1990s, they were completely abandoned, and their symbolic meanings were forever lost. From 2006 to 2009, Kempenaers toured around the ex-Yugoslavia region (now Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, etc.) with the help of a 1975 map of memorials, bringing before our eyes a series of melancholy yet striking images. His photos raise a question: can these former monuments continue to exist as pure sculptures? On one hand, their physical dilapidated condition and institutional neglect reflect a more general social historical fracturing. And on the other hand, they are still of stunning beauty without any symbolic significances. I know this may sound schizophrenic if you also read my last post. But maybe there are forms that can transcend meaning...
http://www.cracktwo.com/2011/04/25-abandoned-soviet-monuments-that-look.html

917 Sitting 101: Desk Ergonomics
I consider myself an active person and am definitely happier strolling about than sitting, but I sit for a large portion of the day. I blog – how could I avoid a chair? Like most things, there's a technique to sitting. A well-designed workstation Sitting, 101, Desk, Ergonomics
http://www.fitsugar.com/Sitting-101-Desk-Ergonomics-1669975

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.
http://jhaible.de/polykorg/jh_polykorg_clone.html

878 Paul's Extreme Sound Stretch
This is a program for stretching the audio. It is suitable only for extreme sound stretching of the audio (like 50x) and for applying special effects by "spectral smoothing" the sounds. It can transform any sound/music to a texture. The program is Open-Source and it's released under the version 2 of the General Public License. You can download the source code for Linux or the Windows binaries. Please note that this is suitable only for extreme time stretching (e.g. if have a melody of 3 minutes and you want to listen it in 3 hours). If you want "less extreme" time stretching, you can use a program which contains the SoundTouch library.
http://hypermammut.sourceforge.net/paulstretch/

868 How Facebook Ships Code « FrameThink – Frameworks for Thinking People
I’m fascinated by the way Facebook operates. It’s a very unique environment, not easily replicated (nor would their system work for all companies, even if they tried). These are notes gathered from talking with many friends at Facebook about how the company develops and releases software. It’s been over six months since I assembled these observations and I’m sure Facebook has continuously evolved its software development practices in the meantime. So these notes are probably a little bit out-of-date. It also seems like Facebook’s developer-driven culture is coming under greater public scrutiny. So I’m feeling more comfortable now about releasing these notes… HUGE thanks to the many folks who helped put together this view inside of Facebook! Thanks are also due to folks like epriest and fryfrog who have written up corrections and edits.
http://framethink.wordpress.com/2011/01/17/how-facebook-ships-code/

865 Evolver.html
Just Beautiful! What an amazing instrument! The DSI Evolver has the signature "old school" timbre down pat as well as being able to provide digital timbres reminiscent of the Waldorf Q. There's certainly a "rougher" side available as well with all the feedback implementation and controled distortion. Being able to make PM type plucked and blown sounds is just icing on the cake. Dave Smith should be commended for a job well done. Just have a look at the Panel Layout to get a taste of what this beauty can dish out - the controls are pretty much laid out in the form of a signal path graphic. Be sure to visit Dave Smith's Website! Evolver Sound Examples There are a lot of demos of the Evolver on the web showcasing the gutsy harsh sounds of this beast so I decided to post demos of some of my own patches as examples of the "softer" more "vintage" side of the Evolver's timbre. I make no apologies for these unpolished recordings - these are merely sound samples ;) Resonant Plucked Pad This pad shows some of the rich resonant nature of the filter. Soft Lead This is a simple analog brass lead patch. FM Pad A fun patch with lots of motion made using my "Audio-rate Filter FM" programming tip below. Warm Pad A nice bland-vanilla pad ^_^ What can I say? I love pads... For more MP3 demos showing the full gamut of sounds the Evolver and Polyevolver are capable of, please visit the excellent website of Stefan Trippler! The Definitive Guide to Evolver This rather in-depth guide to the Evolver goes places and does things a mere manual can't. This labor-of-love was crafted by Anu Kirk and with his kind permission, I am offering this fantastic resource right here in PDF format! A much smaller version (400K) is here but it dosen't have internal hyperlinks. Programming Tips Here's a fun repository of programming tips for the Evolver in all its incarnations. Please email me if you would like to add some. Fingered Wave Sequence Submitted by Dave Bryce. This brilliant technique has to be heard to be believed! Plus, its one of those cool things unique to the Evolver! This particular tip is so full of detailed information that it gets its own page! Audio-rate Filter FM Submitted by James Maier. Use the "Audio Mod" parameter in the Filter section to frequency-modulate the cutoff with the analog oscillator. Add resonance until the filter is just on the edge of oscillation then mod the cutoff with just a little triangle LFO set at a very slow speed. Amazing moving chorusing pad and lead sounds can be made this way. Fatter Bass/Pad Sounds Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the same sound in both channels (detuned saws, for instance). With the filters at the 24dB setting, increasing resonance cuts the passband as on the Moog filters. Set Envelope 3 to minimum attack, maximum decay and release, and sustain to maximum. This "creates" an offset, a continuous "on" signal while the keys are gated. Modulate one filters' resonance up (just one), or of the overall resonance level is high, us it to modulate one filters' resonance to its minimum. You get the resonant character plus the size of the non-resonant filter. Use Tri and Sine waves on that side too. "Warmer" Sounds Submitted by James Maier. The Evolver can make many ultra-bright and buzzy sounds due to its extensive feedback and distortion stages but sometimes people miss the subtler side of the beast. For a warmer sound use little or no distortion, close the filter just a bit and turn off the feedback and delay lines. I've managed to get dead-on Prophet5 timbres this way. Adding "Punch" Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the envelopes to linear, and use a Mod to modulate AmpEnv All by itself (lin through log responses with positive and negative self-modulation). This is of course fun on the filter envelopes as well. More Vintage Character Submitted by Mike Peake. Oscillator Slop, set at 5, doesn't come close to the Moog and other old-timer movement, so add slight (1 or 2) LFO to pitch modulations, with individual LFOs per oscillator, and a touch of LFO to LFO rate modulation. A tad of Envelope 3 to pitch helps as well. Don't miss out on the 12dB filter setting Submitted by Mike Peake. The 24dB setting has much more resonance, but the 12dB setting can sound nice and plucky, and do nice slightly fuzzy pads etc. DSI Evolver Waveshape Charts Below are charts I've assembled of the digital waveforms and their spectra as currently used in the DSI Evolver synthesizers. Originally these waves were unique to the SCI ProphetVS vector synth. I find these waveform/spectra graphics really usefull when programming sounds - maybe you will as well. Pay special attention to the spectra as this info is sometimes much more useful than waveshape in determining actual timbre - even before you hear what the waveform sounds like. These are designed to be downloaded (right-click & "save target as"), and printed at 300dpi on 8.5" x 11" pages - don't resize these images before printing or you will lose useful detail. Use them as a handy refrence. This information was cobbled together from various scattered sources (with very special thanks to Achim Gratz!). Any errors or omissions are my own. ^_^ HAVE FUN!!! Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 As far as the origin of these waves is concerned, one of the original VS engineers, Chris Meyer, said: "The original waves for the VS were created three ways - extracting single-cycles from sampled sounds, using a custom additive synthesis program, and using a program Josh (Josh Jeffe, another VS engineer) slapped together called "Hacker" where you could draw the waveshape. These were fed straight from the computer through the filter and VCA of a Pro-One to figure out what they might sound like in a patch. And by the way, no PPG waveforms appear inside the VS - we had access to them, but in the end our consciences got the better of us. We did steal some waveforms from the Korg DW6000, but only by looking at the harmonic drawings on the front panel and trying to imitate them in our additive synthesis program." Modulation Matrix "Cheat Sheet" This chart shows all the modulation routing available on the Evolver. This same info is available in the manual but this can be printed on a single sheet of paper as a handy refrence! Evolver Wallpaper These I created just for fun and desktop "beautification" ;) 1280 X 1024 1024 X 768 800 X 600
http://www.carbon111.com/evolver.html

812 ED102 - Octave-Volts-Hertz
The ED102 borrows heavily from the Korg MS-02™ although it was developed independently of Korg Inc. Korg and MS-02 are the trademarks of Korg Inc. Among presently available music synthesizers, there are two different types of control system used for controlling devices such as the VCO (voltage controlled oscillator) and VCF (voltage controlled filter). These two systems been: Hertz/Volt (Hz/V) and Octave/Volt (Oct/V). The graph to the left shows the relationship between the VCO oscillator frequency (pitch) and the control voltage (keyboard output voltage). The straight line on the graph is from a synthesizer in which there is a one octave change for every one volt change in the control voltage (Oct/V). In contrast, the curved line on the graph is the control voltage from a synthesizer in which the VCO frequency is proportional to voltage (Hz/V system). To allow these systems to work together you will need a module like this ED102. The built-in, fully adjustable log amp and anti-log amp ensure complete system flexibility and compatibility between any presently voltage controlled synthesiser. The Hz/V system In the Hz/V system, the VCO oscillator frequency is proportional to the control voltage so that, for example, if the frequency of a VCO increases by 100Hz for every volt applied, then applying 1V, 2V and 3V to this VCO would generate 100Hz, 200Hz and 300Hz respectively. The Oct/V system In the Oct/V system the VCO oscillator frequency changes one octave for every one volt change in the control voltage so that, for example, 1V, 2V and 3V to a VCO would generate 200Hz, 400Hz and 800Hz respectively. Features and Functions Log Amp: This changes a Hz/V type keyboard CV (control voltage) output into an OCT/V type of CV. Use the Log Amp to change the control signal from, say, a Korg or Yamaha synthesiser into a signal you can use with another type of synthesizer. Antilog Amp: This changes an OCT/V type of keyboard CV output into a Hz/V type of CV. Use this Antilog Amp when you want to control, say, a Korg synthesiser by means of a unit that uses the OCT/V system.
http://www.elby-designs.com/panther/ed102-octave-volts-hertz/ed102.htm

767 The 5 types of programmers « Steven Benner's Blog
In my code journeys and programming adventures I’ve encountered many strange foes, and even stranger allies. I’ve identified at least five different kinds of code warriors, some make for wonderful comrades in arms, while others seem to foil my every plan. However they all have their place in the pantheon of software development. Without a healthy mix of these different programming styles you’ll probably find your projects either take too long to complete, are not stable enough or are too perfect for humans to look upon. The duct tape programmer The code may not be pretty, but damnit, it works! This guy is the foundation of your company. When something goes wrong he will fix it fast and in a way that won’t break again. Of course he doesn’t care about how it looks, ease of use, or any of those other trivial concerns, but he will make it happen, without a bunch of talk or time-wasting nonsense. The best way to use this person is to point at a problem and walk away. The OCD perfectionist programmer You want to do what to my code? This guy doesn’t care about your deadlines or budgets, those are insignificant when compared to the art form that is programming. When you do finally receive the finished product you will have no option but submit to the stunning glory and radiant beauty of perfectly formatted, no, perfectly beautiful code, that is so efficient that anything you would want to do to it would do nothing but defame a masterpiece. He is the only one qualified to work on his code. The anti-programming programmer I’m a programmer, damnit. I don’t write code. His world has one simple truth; writing code is bad. If you have to write something then you’re doing it wrong. Someone else has already done the work so just use their code. He will tell you how much faster this development practice is, even though he takes as long or longer than the other programmers. But when you get the project it will only be 20 lines of actual code and will be very easy to read. It may not be very fast, efficient, or forward-compatible, but it will be done with the least effort required. The half-assed programmer What do you want? It works doesn’t it? The guy who couldn’t care less about quality, that’s someone elses job. He accomplishes the tasks that he’s asked to do, quickly. You may not like his work, the other programmers hate it, but management and the clients love it. As much pain as he will cause you in the future, he is single-handedly keeping your deadlines so you can’t scoff at it (no matter how much you want to). The theoretical programmer Well, that’s a possibility, but in practice this might be a better alternative. This guy is more interested the options than what should be done. He will spend 80% of his time staring blankly at his computer thinking up ways to accomplish a task, 15% of his time complaining about unreasonable deadlines, 4% of his time refining the options, and 1% of his time writing code. When you receive the final work it will always be accompanied by the phrase “if I had more time I could have done this the right way”. Where do you fit? Personally, I’d have to classify myself as the perfectionist. So, which type of programmer are you? Or perhaps you know another programming archetype that is missing from my list? Post a comment below and I’ll add it to a new updated list.
http://stevenbenner.com/2010/07/the-5-types-of-programmers/

746 40 Essential CSS Templates, Resources and Downloads | Speckyboy Design Magazine
Every web developer should have in their toolbox a collection of CSS tools and resources like the ones outlined in this article. A set of techniques that you rely on and that are always at the ready to cover any possible eventuality. You will find not a selection of the latest innovative CSS techniques (there are some) in this article, merely a collection of tools, resources and downloads that can be used by web designers for solutions to everyday CSS design and coding solutions. The resources below have been split into four categories: CSS Download Packages (all of the CSS resources offer multiple variations of each technique), Downloadable CSS Tools (the resources within this category offers specialized templates), Web, Mobile & Form Frameworks (+ tools and templates to help you get started with each); Feature-Rich and Outstanding Mobile & Web Templates and finally, a selection of tools to help with cross browser compatibility. We don’t presume that this is an ultimate collection, merely a selection of resources we have found to be indispensable. We are positive we have missed a few, and would love to hear about the tools and resources you rely upon.
http://speckyboy.com/2010/11/08/40-essential-css-templates-resources-and-downloads/

722 Making AJAX Applications Crawlable - Google Code
If you're running an AJAX application with content that you'd like to appear in search results, we have a new process that, when implemented, can help Google (and potentially other search engines) crawl and index your content. Historically, AJAX applications have been difficult for search engines to process because AJAX content is produced dynamically by the browser and thus not visible to crawlers. While there are existing methods for dealing with this problem, they involve regular manual maintenance to keep the content up-to-date. Learn more Learn why search engines don't see the content you see and what needs to happen to fix this. Getting started guide Get started in making your AJAX application visible to search engines. If you are in a hurry, you can start here, but AJAX crawling is a complex topic, so we recommend reading all the documentation. Creating HTML snapshots Learn more about creating HTML snapshots, and which technique might be best suited for your application. Frequently asked questions Having trouble? Check out the frequently asked questions. Specification Get the details.
http://code.google.com/intl/fr/web/ajaxcrawling/

714 30 free programming eBooks « citizen428.blog()
Since this post got quite popular I decided to incorporate some of the excellent suggestions posted in the comments, so this list now has more than 40 books in it. [UPDATED: 2010-10-12] Learning a new programming language always is fun and there are many great books legally available for free online. Here’s a selection of 30 of them: Lisp/Scheme: How to Desing Programs Interpreting Lisp (PDF, suggested by Gary Knott) Let Over Lambda On Lisp Practical Common Lisp Programming in Emacs Lisp Programming Languages. Application and Interpretation (suggested by Alex Ott) Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days Visual LISP Developer’s Bible (suggested by “skatterbrainz”) Ruby: Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Design Patterns in Ruby Learn to Program MacRuby: The Definitive Guide Mr. Neighborly’s Humble Little Ruby Book (suggested by @tundal45) Programming Ruby Read Ruby 1.9 Ruby Best Practices Ruby on Rails Tutorial Book (suggested by @tundal45) Javascript: Building iPhone Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Eloquent Javascript jQuery Fundamentals Mastering Node Haskell: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good Real World Haskell Erlang: Concurrent Programming in Erlang Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good Python: Dive into Python How to Think Like a Computer Scientist – Learning with Python Smalltalk: Dynamic Web Development with Seaside Pharo by Example (based on the next book in this list, suggested by Anonymous) Squeak by Example Misc: Algorithms The Art of Assembly Language Beginning Perl Building Accessible Websites (suggested by Joe Clark) The C Book C# Yellow Book (suggested by Joe Wyatt) Compiler Construction Dive Into HTML 5 (suggested by @til) Higher-Order Perl The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages (suggested by “Def”) An Introduction to R Learn Prolog Now! Objective-C 2.0 Essentials Programming Scala Of course there are many more free programming eBooks, but this list consists of the ones I read or want(ed) to read. This is far from comprehensive and languages that are completely missing are mostly left out on purpose (e.g. PHP, C++, Java). I’m sure somebody else made a list for them somewhere.
http://citizen428.net/archives/434

691 visualizing.org
Visualizing.org is a community of creative people working to make sense of complex issues through data and design… and it’s a shared space and free resource to help you achieve this goal. Why Visualizing.org? By some estimates, we now create more data each year than in the entirety of prior human history. Data visualization helps us approach, interpret, and extract knowledge from this information. Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen government agencies, NGOs, and companies open up their data for the public to see and use. And we’ve seen data visualization figure more prominently in design curricula, conference programs, and the media. We created Visualizing.org because we want to help connect the proliferation of public data… with a community that can help us understand this data… with the general public. What is Visualizing.org? What can I do on the site? For designers: Visualizing is a place to showcase your work, get feedback, ensure that your work is seen by lots of people and gets used by teachers, journalists, and conference organizers to help educate the public about various world issues Visualizing is a free resource to search for data Use Visualizing to keep up with and be inspired by the latest work from other designers and design schools Learn about new visualization tools, blogs, books and other resources to help your work Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike License For teachers and schools: Visualizing is a place to exhibit the collective work of your students, organize assignments and class projects, and help your students find data for their own visualizations We’re working on new tools to help you share teaching material with other teachers As an Academic Partner, your students are eligible to participate in various design competitions – we’re hosting the first Visualizing Marathon in New York in October To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For bloggers and journalists: Visualizing is a resource to find data visualizations about a wide variety of world issues to inform and accompany your own reporting – and it’s easy to embed visualizations and widgets from Visualizing on your own site For conference organizers: As a Knowledge Partner, Visualizing allows you to use data visualizations at your conferences under a Creative Commons License To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For all: Visualizing is a new and fun online resource to learn more about the world in all its complexity and inter-dependence -- and become more comfortable with data and how it can be visually represented How does it work? The site is open and free to use. Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. Simply put, this means that anyone can share, copy, remix, or build upon the visualization as long as: (i) it is used non-commercially; and (ii) the visualization’s creator and source are credited.
http://www.visualizing.org/

674 Remove Complex Backgrounds from Images in Photoshop - How-To Geek
While tools like the Magic Eraser can sometimes remove your backgrounds, the fact is you're going to have to get your hands dirty with the eraser if you have images with complex backgrounds that need removing. Windows, Windows Vista, Ubuntu, Programming, Networking, Firefox, Help, Solaris, Linux, Unix, VMware ,SQL Server, Oracle, MySQL, Analytics, Suse, Redhat, network security, firewall, postgresql,database, how to, how-to, howto, hints, tips, shell scripts, system administration
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/29811/remove-complex-backgrounds-from-images-in-photoshop/

672 101 Absolutely Breathtaking Infrared Photographs | Tutorial9
There is nothing quite like Infrared Photography. In this showcase, over 100 phenomenal photos have been gathered, as well as some tutorials and equipment suggestions for aspiring photographers. freebies & resources,roundups
http://www.tutorial9.net/resources/101-absolutely-breathtaking-infrared-photographs/

660 What's Next: fully ergonomic laptops? | VentureBeat
When the first laptops were created around 1979 — laptops like the Grid Compass — ergonomics was not exactly a core concern. The screens were only 2-4 inches, RAM was a few hundred kilobytes, and batteries were huge. The Osbourne 1 weighed 24 pounds, perhaps making it the first portable computer and dumbbell. Hooray for convergence! Modern clamshell and tablet designs have solved many of these issues: screen sizes exceed 17”, RAM can be several gigabytes, and weight can be less than three pounds, deservedly earning names like the Air. What hasn’t been solved is ergonomics, and that’s a costly problem. The U.S. Department of Labor reported 650,000 cases of work-related muscular disorders, costing businesses an estimated $20 billion in medical claims and lost productivity. An ergonomically ideal computer setup aligns the top of the screen with our eye level, lets our arms and wrists straighten, and allows our shoulders to relax. Because laptop screens are attached to their keyboards, they require a damaging trade-off: place the laptop at eye level and hunch our shoulders, or place the keyboard at arm level and bend our neck. Most laptop keyboards are also rectangles, requiring wrist twisting. The result is chronic neck, shoulder, and wrist pain, and with laptop use increasing, this problem will only get worse.
http://venturebeat.com/2009/08/14/whats-next-fully-ergonomic-laptops/

637 50 List of Free Online Photo Editing Tools | blueblots.com
Editing an image is very popular these days due to the innovation of graphic software programs that will allow us to create computer arts from scratch. However, we could also enhance, add some cool effects and customize the look of our images easily without having the need of these soft wares through the online photo editors. An online photo editor tool allows us to edit and manipulate a photo in the Web Browser. This is more advantageous compared to the softwares for editing an image as this could not consume much of the memory of your desktop and the processing is done faster by the server. With just a few clicks, we could now be able to customize our own photos, create funny photos from our pictures or even feature ourselves in a magazine cover like that of a celebrity. Here are the 50 List of Photo Editing Tools to Help You Edit Images and Photos Online for free. Try to check and get your best pick!
http://blueblots.com/tools/50-list-of-free-online-photo-editing-tools/

623 Less Framework 2
A CSS framework for cross-device layouts .grid_5 .clearfix 960 px Everyone writes CSS differently. Less Framework takes this into account by having a minimal set of features, and does away with things like predefined classes. All it really contains are: a set of media-queries typography presets aligned to a 24 px baseline grid and a grid, with its column sizes noted down within CSS comments. Nothing more, nothing less. It doesn’t try to do anything for you, and doesn’t change the way you work.
http://lessframework.com/

616 Alphabet Soup modular synth
The STS Serge Modular can be a daunting system at first blush, especially for those who come from an "East Coast" modular synth background. My first synthesizers were Moog analogs and my first Analog Modular Synth was an Arrick "Dotcom" system - so I started out with East Coast paradigms that I had to "unlearn" in order to use my Serge Modular to the fullest. For those of you coming from a similar background or those just discovering the Serge Modular for the first time, these "Alphabet Soup" pages are dedicated to you! The Serge Modular is intuitive and fun to use - especially when you realize the main difference between a Serge Modular and most others has to do with the size of the building blocks, where a Moog or similar modular will have monolithic building blocks like ADSRs and Oscillators, the Serge can be more "low-level" in that you can build ADSRs and oscillators from Serge modules or, more properly, Function Blocks. These Function Blocks usually come bearing arcane names that have been shortened to an "Alphabet Soup" conglomeration of acronyms. In this series of articles, I'll be talking about some of the ways to approach these Function Blocks to create much more useful, surprising, complex or just simply fun synthesis features. The first function block we're going to look at is the "DSG", otherwise known as the Dual Universal Slope Generator. This mild-mannered module is in some ways the most powerful one in the entire Serge catalog because it can become so many different things depending on where you place the patch cords...as you'll soon see.
http://www.carbon111.com/alphabet1.html

610 . � ��'�i|�,_ � ��'�i|�,_ . welcome @ deep!sonic � ��'�i|�,_ . � ��'�i|�,_ .
.:[ Hello Electromusic Lovers ! ]:. Es ist gelogen, dass Videogames Kids beeinflussen. Hätte PAC MAN das getan, würden wir heute durch dunkle Räume irren, Pillen fressen und elektronische Musik hören! (Christian Wilson, Nintendo Inc., 1989) In deep!sonic i primary show my musican side in my life. More and more also people come here to watch the balance in my life - photography in nature. I like the world wide web and found lot of information and answers. Because this i feel better to give a little bit back and presents my works here in deep!sonic. But more i think it's important to feel and life culture with all kinds.
http://www.deepsonic.ch/

596 Eventide
Accessories Eventide PitchFactor Support Links ›Documentation ›Software Updates ›PitchFactor Support ›Knowledge Base ›Forum Find a Dealer No Comparison Nothing Sounds Like an Eventide Through the decades, top players have depended on Eventide: Jimmy Page, Frank Zappa, Brian May, Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai, Robert Fripp, John Petrucci, and Adrian Belew, to name a few. Now, for the first time these effects are portable AND affordable. Stompbox simple, PitchFactor fits on your pedalboard or in your gigbag. Features Specifications Photos Media Studio Quality Effects at Your Feet Top recording studios worldwide use Eventide effects on hit after hit. PitchFactor includes Eventide's best pitch-changing effects from the past 39 years without compromising quality OR flexibility. Flexibility Built-In Plug-and-play expression pedal control of wet/dry mix or any combination of parameters. Control program changes and vary parameters continuously via MIDI. Supports instrument or line level inputs and outputs. Plays well with others; adapts seamlessly with a wide variety of amps and other foot pedals. Obsolescence is so 20th Century Easy to upgrade; download new software from the Internet and install via USB. Features 10 of Eventide’s signature stereo or mono pitch+delay effects: Diatonic PitchFlex™ Quadravox™ Octaver™ HarModulator™ Crystals™ MicroPitch HarPeggiator™ H910 / H949 Synthonizer™ Up to 4 voices of diatonic pitch shifting and up to 1.5 seconds of stereo delay Studio quality sound Guitar or bass compatible Built-in Tuner Software upgradeable via USB 2.0 MIDI control via USB or MIDI in, out/thru Instant program change Real-time control with 10 knobs, MIDI, or expression pedal Tap tempo and MIDI clock sync 100 factory presets, unlimited through MIDI True analog bypass Rugged cast metal construction Reliable metal footswitches for instant preset access Mono or stereo operation Guitar or line level inputs and outputs
http://www.eventide.com/AudioDivision/Products/StompBoxes/PitchFactor.aspx

576 55 Excellent Examples of Websites Using HTML5 | Inspiration
Html 5 is the new and updated version of the web standard and famous HTML. The HTML 5 has tons of new features, techniques and elements that allow designers to create new and beautiful stuff in short line codes. The new standard incorporates features like video playback and drag-and-drop that have been previously dependent on third-party browser plug-ins such as Adobe Flash, Microsoft Silverlight, and Google Gears. With HTML5 you can add some really nice effects to your website without loosing your head to do it... it's for sure a nice way to go. html,html5,inspiration,web design
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/55-excellent-examples-of-websites-using-html5/

561 How to Choose the Right Android ROM For You
There are tons of great reasons to root your Android phone, but once you do, you'll likely be overwhelmed with all the custom ROM options out there. Here's how to go about finding—and installing—the one that fits your needs. How to Choose the Right Android ROM For You, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/5596108/how-to-choose-the-right-android-rom-for-you/

547 Din Sync: How to modify a Korg Monotron
So here's how to modify Korg's new Monotron analog ribbon synthesizer. Perhaps this is the first document of Monotron mods in Europe since it still hasn't been released here. It's actually a very easy machine to modify because for whatever reason Korg decided to label all the interesting points on the bottom side of the PCB. This may well have been for testing units at the factory/service centers. Perhaps though it could have been that the designers anticipated this little machine would be hacked, much like the Gakken which pretty obviously inspired this piece. Incidentally in the magazine that comes with the Gakken there's a picture of them showing it to Korg, that was in 2008, go figure.
http://www.dinsync.info/2010/06/how-to-modify-korg-monotron.html

518 LA MUSIQUE INDUSTRIELLE
QU’EST-CE QUE LA MUSIQUE INDUSTRIELLE ? Vous trouverez chez les disquaires bien achalandés un coin réservé aux albums d’ " indus ", souvent mélangés au gothique, à la cold ou encore aux indépendants. Les couleurs noire et grise dominent les pochettes et les noms des groupes sont souvent longs et imprononçables, à consonance allemande ou anglaise. Pour continuer dans le cliché, on peut décrire la musique industrielle comme un style basé sur des percussions métalliques qui martèlent, accompagnées de bruits agressifs souvent dissonants et de voix trafiquées, criées plus que chantées. En fait, l’indus est pour beaucoup une musique suspecte, appréciée par d’étranges mélomanes qui n’auraient pas compris que la musique moderne est faite pour distraire, pour danser ou encore adoucir les mœurs. Peu de gens savent en fait ce qu’est l’industriel à proprement parler. Pourtant ce style a été très productif et une partie de la musique actuelle s’en inspire. A la base, l’industriel est un mouvement de contestation sociale et artistique. Il rejette le contrôle de la musique populaire par les businessmen, les médias et tous les hommes de pouvoir. Son essor est marqué par la création d’Industrial Records, à Londres, à la fin des années 1970 par le groupe Throbbing Gristle. C’est un des premiers labels indépendants, une entreprise de production et de diffusion de cassettes audio et de 33 tours, qui laisse ses musiciens s’exprimer sans contrainte, ni censure, ni souci de rentabilité. Il développe une " stratégie de guérilla " contre les major company, ces entreprises qui soumettent la musique populaire aux lois du marché. Plus généralement, le mouvement industriel vomit l’industrie des loisirs orchestrée par les grands médias. Il cherche à faire réfléchir sur la propagande et le marketing, sur l’utilisation de l’art et des diverses techniques de communication pour convaincre et dominer. L’ambition est de créer une alternative à la culture de masse afin de lutter contre l’uniformisation des esprits. Pape de l’industriel, Genesis P-Orridge (alias Neil Megson) explique qu’au départ le but est de "savoir jusqu’où on pouvait métamorphoser et coller le son, présenter des sons complexes et non-divertissants dans une situation de culture populaire, afin de convaincre et de convertir. Nous voulions réinvestir la musique rock avec un contenu, une motivation et un risque. " Apparu en même temps que le punk, l’industriel se veut plus radical, plus réfléchi et surtout plus novateur en matière musicale. Il milite pour l’éclatement des codes musicaux qu’ils soient rock, jazz, classique ou pop. Recherchant l’imprévu, fuyant le formatage, il puise dans différents styles. Par ailleurs, de nouveaux instruments sont incorporés à la musique. Les membres d’Einstürzende Neubauten utilisent des perceuses, de l’eau, des tôles, ou même leurs dents pour produire des sons originaux. Dès le départ, les instruments électroniques ont été privilégiés : boites à rythme, synthétiseurs et les tout premiers échantillonneurs (sampleurs), dès le début des années 1980. Ces instruments électroniques aidant, l’indus a été produit par des non-musiciens et a développé la répétitivité (utilisation des séquenceurs). C’est dans ce sens que l’industriel est pour une bonne part à l’origine de la techno. L’industriel ne se limite pas au départ à un courant musical, c’est une tentative d’art total. Soit les musiciens indus sont des touches à tout en matière artistique (Genesis P-Orridge, Jim Thirlwell), soit ils collaborent fréquemment avec des cinéastes, des troupes de théâtre ou de danse contemporaine. Pour les disques, le graphisme des pochettes compte parfois autant que la musique elle-même. Dans toutes ses expressions artistiques, l’industriel recherche la provocation la plus radicale, le choc et la confusion. Les thèmes développés sont autant de tabous : le totalitarisme sous toutes ses formes (propagande, uniformes militaires, symboles païens, plus ou moins fascistes ou nazis) ; le sado-masochisme, bouffonnerie spectaculaire parodiant les rapports humains ; la mort. C’est un constat froid des horreurs du monde, l’irruption de la laideur sous toutes ses formes dans la musique populaire. Mais attention, l’humour, le sarcasme et le cynisme sont essentiels dans l’indus. L’ironie et l’ambiguïté sont fondatrices : la musique qui se proclame industrielle s’oppose à l’industrie de la musique et aux valeurs de la société industrielle. Les membres de Throbbing Gristle troquaient volontiers leurs uniformes pour des chemises hawaïennes, Current 93 s’est pris de passion pour le héros enfantin Oui-Oui (Noddy), Laibach a parodié pompeusement les Beatles, Clair Obscur a chanté les cours de la bourse, après avoir smurfé au goulag, et Foetus s’est fait connaître par une parodie de disco en l’honneur du marquis de Sade (avant Mylène Farmer !). Tous les musiciens qui se prétendent industriels mais s’expriment sans cette ironie fondatrice ou sans véritable recherche musicale utilisent le terme abusivement. Dès 1981, Throbbing Gristle se sépare. Genesis P-Orridge explique : " nous avons quitter un milieu envahi par des idées et des gens malsains, parce que ces gens ont choisi de ne pas comprendre ce que nous disions. C’est devenu une surenchère de provocation ". On a assisté en effet à une dérive et un appauvrissement musical. L’industriel est devenu un style parmi les autres. Comme tout mouvement contestataire, il a été récupérée ; à la fois par les médias et par des mouvements d’extrême droite. Ainsi on a pu entendre, dans des publicités télévisées, des percussions métalliques pour vanter les mérites de slips très masculins, ou bien des bruits de mécanique qui déraille sortant d’un autoradio, pour vendre une voiture à la mécanique irréprochable. Les liens avérés avec l’extrême-droite ne concernent que quelques uns : en particulier Boyd Rice (du groupe NON) et plusieurs pâles ersatz du groupe de folk industriel Death in June, englués dans une soupe européaniste nauséabonde, où se mêlent révolution conservatrice, paganisme nordique ou celtique, thèmes guerriers et romantisme noir. Ces connivences ont jeté le discrédit sur tout le mouvement industriel. C’est oublier que les artistes d’Industrial records refusaient de s’exprimer sur le terrain politique traditionnel, que des groupes se sont engagés à gauche (Test Dept), tandis que d’autres ont affirmé leur rejet de l’extrême-droite (Front 242). Beaucoup cependant répugnent à se justifier et continuent de jouer le jeu dangereux de la provocation fasciste. Il y a peu le groupe allemand Substanz t. a échantillonné la phrase suivante dans un morceau : " if you don’t like fascism, don’t play industrial music " (compilation teknoir, 1998).
http://nksinternational.free.fr/indus.html

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

481 50 Powerful Time-Savers For Web Designers - Smashing Magazine
Being a web designer is not easy. Not only do we need to have a good understanding about visual design, typography, information architecture, psychology and a plethora of other disciplines; in our work, we need to take care of so many details, so that our job becomes more and more time-consuming, requiring dozens of tools, attention span and an effective workflow for beautiful, timely and functional results. And this is where small time-savers become handy. Be it a handy checklist, batch installer, dummy image generator or converter from Excel spreadsheet to HTML — all these things can save us a couple of minutes every day, making our work easier and more efficient. And this is why we keep collecting them for Smashing Magazine’s readers. Whether you like lists or not: this one will probably help you find those little nuggets out there that will help you avoid headaches and stress. Below we present useful time-savers for web designers.
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/28/50-powerful-time-savers-for-web-designers/

466 Musicians – This Is How You Create A Great Looking Facebook Page
Like most of you, I too LIKE Facebook, and ever since my last TechCrunch post (How to Build Engaging One-of-Kind Facebook Fan Pages), I've been exploring and trying to find new ways to improve the creation process of a Page. This time, I'd like to focus on a how-to for the musicians among you.
http://techcrunch.com/2010/06/27/facebook-musicians-page/

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front … if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant Donnés, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

416 Welcome to the Modular Corner
Welcome to the Modular Corner! This site is intended as a resource for all users of the Pulsar / Scope Modular synth, a software synthesizer which comes with the Scope range of soundcards from Sonic Core (formerly Creamware). Here you will find information about the Modular Synth, it's various components, the many patches that are available for the Synth along with other related documents and links to do with all things Modular. On the Patches page, you will find information about individual patches that have been created for the Modular. This aims to be a complete listing of all the Modular patches that have become available, with a brief description of the patch. Where possible this will include a more detailed description, mp3 examples, signal flow diagrams, etc, in order to build up a more comprehensive 'manual' for the many patches that are available. The downloads page has other related resources, such as freeware modules, documents on modular synthesis, etc. Your contributions are vital - If you made a patch that you're proud of, or if you've downloaded someone else's that you like - let me know. I can't write up every patch on my own.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/index.html

387 Kaossilator Hacks and Hidden Features [Tim Rideout : recording artist, music producer, New Media musician]
Geek,Music production,Film soundtracks,Technology,Synthesizers,Cool stuff that I like,Korg,Kaossilator,DJ,Looper,Electronic Music,Hacks,Tips, music, MP3, downloads, Montreal, Fredericton, Quebec, New Brunswick, Canada, artist, electronic, electronica, breakbeat, house, jazz, drums, drummer, musician, producer, new media, loops, samples, indie, independent, Tim Rideout, Fibii Media, cool, hip, geek, singer, songwriter, composer, film maker, DJ, new media
http://www.timrideout.com/spip.php?article176

368 Creating 10 Most-Used Javascript Techniques Using Pure CSS Styling | DevSnippets
Whatever content we have, we can present them in an interactive & more responsive ways with CSS styling only. In this article we’d like to present 10 Impressive techniques using pure CSS styling to create simple and interactive website without using Javascript at all.
http://devsnippets.com/article/techniques-using-pure-css-only.html

353 DIY music from outerspace
Welcome To MFOS, Your Synth-DIY Headquarters. What is synth-DIY? Synth-DIY is just what the name implies. Synthesizer Do It Yourself. Many people, like me, grew up in the dawn of the analog synthesizer age (Moog, ARP, Oberheim, Buchla, RCA, EMu, Fairlight, PAIA and many others) and although we may have really wanted our very own analog synthesizer with dozens of knobs and switches they were w-a-a-a-y out of our reach financially. Now many people with a modicum of electronic skills and a renewed interest in analog synthesizers are discovering that with a schematic, a PC board and some electronic components they can do it themselves!. MFOS' mission is to help people realize their synthesizer dreams. We do this by providing analog synthesizer projects with complete schematics, assembly drawings and professionally manufactured PC boards. If you already have electronic skills... welcome! If you would like to learn more about electronics or analog synthesizers then try these links: How can I start learning about electronics?, Analog Synth 101 and/or The MFOS Book Store. It's never to late to develop a new skill, reignite an old passion or exercise your creativity. Keep imagining, keep inventing, stay ingenious.
http://www.musicfromouterspace.com/analogsynth/synthdiy_links.html

340 7-things-to-stop-doing-now-on-facebook: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
Using a Weak Password Avoid simple names or words you can find in a dictionary, even with numbers tacked on the end. Instead, mix upper- and lower-case letters, numbers, and symbols. A password should have at least eight characters. One good technique is to insert numbers or symbols in the middle of a word, such as this variant on the word "houses": hO27usEs! Leaving Your Full Birth Date in Your Profile More from ConsumerReports.org: • Millions of Users Exposing Personal Information • Tested: 119 Laptops, Desktops, Netbooks and iPad • Electronics Reviews It's an ideal target for identity thieves, who could use it to obtain more information about you and potentially gain access to your bank or credit card account. If you've already entered a birth date, go to your profile page and click on the Info tab, then on Edit Information. Under the Basic Information section, choose to show only the month and day or no birthday at all. Overlooking Useful Privacy Controls For almost everything in your Facebook profile, you can limit access to only your friends, friends of friends, or yourself. Restrict access to photos, birth date, religious views, and family information, among other things. You can give only certain people or groups access to items such as photos, or block particular people from seeing them. Consider leaving out contact info, such as phone number and address, since you probably don't want anyone to have access to that information anyway. Popular Stories on Yahoo!: • 20 Best Cities to Ride Out the Recession • Wealth Ranking: You're Richer Than You Think • 7 Expenses You Can Ditch in Retirement More from Yahoo! Finance Posting Your Child's Name in a Caption Don't use a child's name in photo tags or captions. If someone else does, delete it by clicking on Remove Tag. If your child isn't on Facebook and someone includes his or her name in a caption, ask that person to remove the name. Mentioning That You'll Be Away From Home That's like putting a "no one's home" sign on your door. Wait until you get home to tell everyone how awesome your vacation was and be vague about the date of any trip. Letting Search Engines Find You To help prevent strangers from accessing your page, go to the Search section of Facebook's privacy controls and select Only Friends for Facebook search results. Be sure the box for public search results isn't checked. Permitting Youngsters to Use Facebook Unsupervised Facebook limits its members to ages 13 and over, but children younger than that do use it. If you have a young child or teenager on Facebook, the best way to provide oversight is to become one of their online friends. Use your e-mail address as the contact for their account so that you receive their notifications and monitor their activities. "What they think is nothing can actually be pretty serious," says Charles Pavelites, a supervisory special agent at the Internet Crime Complaint Center. For example, a child who posts the comment "Mom will be home soon, I need to do the dishes" every day at the same time is revealing too much about the parents' regular comings and goings.
http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home/article/109538/7-things-to-stop-doing-now-on-facebook

332 Web Design Trends for 2010 | Webdesigner Depot
Purists will say that great design is timeless. Yes, in an ideal world, we should ignore trends. Pragmatically speaking, though, there is a lot of value in monitoring and incorporating design trends, especially with regard to websites. Let’s face it: the web changes at a rapid pace. Unlike in other media, design trends on the web are not just driven by aesthetics. Technology is changing that can drastically alter the capabilities of the medium. In 2010, we’re seeing designers continuing to push the boundaries of web design, setting the following clear trends…
http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2010/05/web-design-trends-for-2010/

329 How To Check and Fix Your Facebook Privacy Settings In Less Than A Minute
Since Facebook launched Open Graph API and brought instant personalization with web-release of Like button, everyone is talking about Facebook user's privacy facebook privacy settings, check facebook privacy settings, fix facebook privacy, now want to make data public, facebook settings ,facebook,how-to,internet tips
http://savedelete.com/how-to-check-and-fix-your-facebook-privacy-settings-in-less-than-a-minute.html

323 F.lux: software to make your life better
Ever notice how people texting at night have that eerie blue glow? Or wake up ready to write down the Next Great Idea, and get blinded by your computer screen? During the day, computer screens look good—they're designed to look like the sun. But, at 9PM, 10PM, or 3AM, you probably shouldn't be looking at the sun. f.lux F.lux fixes this: it makes the color of your computer's display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day. It's even possible that you're staying up too late because of your computer. You could use f.lux because it makes you sleep better, or you could just use it just because it makes your computer look better.
http://stereopsis.com/flux/

322 How to Center an Absolutely Positioned Element Using CSS
Centering an absolutely positioned element is a CSS challenge that occurs now and then. The solutions seem obvious once I’ve First, Unlike, Since, Note, This, Horizontally
http://www.sitepoint.com/blogs/2010/05/04/css-center-position-absolute-div/

312 12 Applications to Make Your Facebook Page More Engaging
Currently, there are more than three million active Facebook Pages on the top ranked site, with the typical Page boasting an average of less than 1,000 fans – oops, I mean ‘likes‘ (seriously, that just doesn’t roll off your tongue quite the same way). Standing out from the static requires you to dress up your Page and make it more interesting and fun for your ‘likers’. That’s where Facebook applications come in. They’re basically like plugins for your Page and there are tens of thousands of them available. Deciding what apps you’d like to incorporate depends on how you’d like to engage with your peeps (that’s an even better word than ‘likers’). Here’s a compilation of some must have applications for any Page. They’re great additions to the the basic layout that Facebook provides and they can be used in interesting ways to move your ‘likes‘ into action.
http://www.socialmediatoday.com/SMC/197503/

298 The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook
Facebook is a great service. I have a profile, and so does nearly everyone I know under the age of 60. However, Facebook hasn't always managed its users' data well. In the beginning, it restricted the visibility of a user's personal information to just their friends and their "network" (college or school). Over the past couple of years, the default privacy settings for a Facebook user's personal information have become more and more permissive. They've also changed how your personal information is classified several times, sometimes in a manner that has been confusing for their users. This has largely been part of Facebook's effort to correlate, publish, and monetize their social graph: a massive database of entities and links that covers everything from where you live to the movies you like and the people you trust. This blog post by Kurt Opsahl at the the EFF gives a brief timeline of Facebook's Terms of Service changes through April of 2010. It's a great overview, but I was a little disappointed it wasn't an actual timeline: hence my initial inspiration for this infographic.
http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/

286 The Current State of Web Design: Trends 2010 - Smashing Magazine
Web design is a fickle industry. Just like every other form of artistic expression, Web design has undergone a continuous and surprisingly fast evolution. Once a... 2010, trends, design, magazine, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons, css, fonts
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/05/04/web-design-trends-2010/

256 Geocities-izer - Make Any Webpage Look Like It Was Made By A 13 Year-Old In 1996
Make Any Webpage Look Like It Was Made By A 13 Year-Old In 1996. Geocities, web design, animated gifs, marquee tag, blink tag, midi music
http://wonder-tonic.com/geocitiesizer/

252 Top 10 Sites To Make National And International Phone Calls For Free
When we talk about making phone calls from our PC through internet, we think of  instant messaging services like Yahoo Messenger and Google Talk which provides how to make free international phone calls, free international calls online, online free national and international calls, websites proving free phone calls ,resources,softwares
http://savedelete.com/top-10-websites-to-make-national-and-international-phone-calls-for-free.html

249 Like Button

http://likebutton.me/

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/01/alesis-andromeda-aurora.html

214 Best User Interface Design Resources: The Round-up | Dzine Blog
If you strive to be a great designer (like most), then you’re more than likely to know that a web application or websites success many times rely solely on how well designed the User Interface may be. As you scale the web and even read books, there can be an influx of misleading information pertaining to the way you should design your UI. When in reality you should do what works best for you and your users. Below you will find a variety of excellent User Interface resources that will allow you to access, redefine, and create a well designed User Interface. You should use these resources first as inspiration, and second as somewhat of a guide as to what your users may need when they come face to face with your UI.
http://dzineblog.com/2010/03/best-user-interface-design-resources-the-round-up.html

211 30 Old PC Ads That Will Blow Your Processor | Information Technology Schools
Many people today either are too young to have ever seen some early pc’s or have forgotten what they looked like and how much they cost. Today we complain about the cost of a laptop running 2Ghz with 4GB ram for a cost of $ 400.00, however it wasn’t that long ago that laptops and pc’s were priced quite a bit higher. Here are 30 Old PC ads that will make you laugh and possibly appreciate what you have today.
http://www.informationtechnologyschools.org/blog/2010/30-old-pc-ads-that-will-blow-your-processor/

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