100SILEX, de 0 ŕ 100 s: made
1418 70 years after ww2, pictures made by my forest ranger friend! (Poland) - Imgur
images, funny pictures, image host, image upload, image sharing, image resize
http://imgur.com/gallery/FRPf8

1408 » Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Animodule.com
Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Here’s a quick photodoc of how I made a reusable SMT stencil from some aluminum siding I had laying around. It’s very simple to assemble and works great. Dirt cheap too. I had picked up a roll of aluminum flashing a few years ago to flash some chimneys I rebuilt/repointed and was curious to see how it would hold up as an SMT stencil. To buy an SMT stencil frame is near $1000 so I didn’t have much to lose if it didn’t work out. I cut the frame out of some birch plywood since I had some handy. Really any sturdy frame would do the trick. You could easily glue one together out of some 1x or trim board. I put a thicker sheet of aluminum down underneath the flashing to give the CNC endmill something sturdy to cut against and clamped it down stretched and tight. My thought there was that If I cut straight on the MDF it might push on the flashing and bend it before it cut through. A 1mm endmill did the trick. Each pass was .05mm deep. I pulled the Flashing tight and stapled it to the frame. No rocket science here. I taped up the inside edges so no solderpaste could squeeze between the frame and the stencil. I had some old screen print hinge boards so I just attached this frame the same way I would a screen print stencil. The only fiddly part was aligning the first PCB. You have to push around a little and lift the stencil and fiddle with it a little bit. Once I get all the pads lined up correctly I hold it in place and trace around it with a thin tip sharpie marker. Then you place the PCB in the outline. If you have the height adjusted correctly the stencil is sturdy enough to hold the PCB in place while you print the Solderpaste on it. just hold the stencil frame down and it pushes down on the PCB. I used a flexible putty knife as a squeegee. It worked fine. Cleanup was a breeze. Just scrape it off, unscrew the stencil frame from the hingeboard and stick it in the corner till you are ready to do another run.
http://www.animodule.com/diy-2/cut-simple-smt-stencil-from-common-aluminum-flashing-on-your-cnc/

1391 LED Facts & How To Safely Use LEDS
LED facts, current requirements, voltage and resistor selection. How to properly use LEDs in your own projects. With color and power chart and full details. diy led lamp, diy led light bulb, diy leds, homemade led light bulb, make a led light bulb, diy rv led lights, diy camper led lights, diy auto led light
http://www.thediyworld.com/How-To-Properly-Use-LEDs.php

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1306 Cern
Twenty years of a free, open web On 30 April 1993 CERN published a statement that made World Wide Web technology available on a royalty free basis, allowing the web to flourish On 30 April 1993 CERN published a statement that made World Wide Web ("W3", or simply "the web") technology available on a royalty-free basis. By making the software required to run a web server freely available, along with a basic browser and a library of code, the web was allowed to flourish.
http://info.cern.ch/

1289 Tellement Nomade - Afficher le sujet - Cowon X7
Tellement Nomade Le Forum
http://forum.tellementnomade.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=8&start=210

1253 The Marantz PMD430: The Best Cassette Deck Ever Made? - Audio Ideas Guide Review
analog, cassette decks, Marantz, professional
http://www.audio-ideas.com/reviews/analog-sources/marantz-pmd430.html

1198 Forum de discussion Nokytech
Watercooling Tuning PC Silence PC WaterCooling, Tuning PC, Overclocking, OC, informatique, ventilateur, Watercase, Plexi, Cuivre, ventirad, Heat Pipe, Micro Channel, WB, Boost, performance, Comparatif, Commande Groupée, Dissipateur, Thermique, reservoir, pompe, rehobus, electonique, Compresseur, water Bloc, Radiateur, Boitier PC, news, mod, actualité, hardware, matériel, multimédia, Accessoire, Micro, logiciel, cpu, occasion, boutique, prix, comparer, home-made, Forum, Comparateur, l'informatique, Reportage, journal, Astuces, extreme, Optimisation, CG, Telecharger, Téléchargement, Download, nokytech.net, nokytech
http://www.nokytech.net/forum/index.php

1132 Mammoth Modular Synthesizer At MIT Museum
Just got an update from Joe Paradiso on his homebuilt mammoth analog modular synthesizer. He’s installed it in the MIT Museum and has completed a fairly epic patch which you can listen to (24 hours a day!) here. Joe will be at the museum this Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm, demoing the synth to visitors, so be sure to stop by if you’re in the neighborhood. Here’s some info from Joe on the construction and inspiration for the latest patch. The second patch I made at the MIT Museum is totally done now, and you can hear it live on the stream. Listen to it at http://synth.media.mit.edu, and let me know what you think if you’re inclined – it’s running in physical space in Quad, of course – stereo on the stream. Note that this one has absolutely NO sequencer of any sort on it – all of the patterns you hear were made entirely from hand-patched logic (counters, ands, ors, flip flops, ring counters, rate multipliers, etc.). It’s an entirely different kind of composition environment from the norm – you really need to simultaneously be an engineer while being an artist and something of a performer. The inspiration for this patch started with the Boredoms – if you don’t know who they are, you should (http://www.boredoms.jp/). In particular, I was thinking of SuperRoots 9. The beauty of the patching interface is that you can never exactly nail what you start out to attain, but on the other hand, you get drawn into places you wouldn’t have normally gone once you start. The 3 drummers that Yamantaka Eye performs with lay down a compelling rhythm that my hand-patched logic and analog processing can’t match, of course. But this patch definitely has a strange jumpy groove once it gets into gear, and the 2-chord pad is archetypical too. Yes, Boredoms rule today! BTW, this patch took every cord I had, plus a good 30 more wires just shoved into the pin jacks – check out the photos here and here – the latter shows the kind of logic section patching complexity you need to build a sonic environment like this one. I’m ripping this baby out next Thursday, as I’ll be at the museum next Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm to demonstrate the synthesizer to visitors – doing some very simple patches and showing off what the modules do in case anybody is interested in this. It will run continuously until then. Otherwise, enjoy the stream – there are moments of introspective drift in-between wild percussion (yes, Boredoms!). I might pull the percussion line back so it doesn’t come so often or regularly, but it’s essentially a wrap.
http://synth.media.mit.edu/

1048 COIL
COIL Any future official Coil news and releases will be made here. Jordi Devas (the executor of Peter's estate) and myself intend to make the entire Coil back catalogue available again on CD and any previously unreleased or unfinished work will be released as such. All in good time. There have been NO official Coil releases since Peter passed away and I can confirm that a recent unofficial release has absolutely nothing to do with Coil . Please don't feed these parasites to genuine creativity.
http://www.arktodd.com/page10.htm

1043 Monotribe, MIDI and me
synth When I heard about the monotribe, I had my doubts. Mostly that there’s only one pattern, which is 8 steps long. Well, there are 8 extra steps for the drums, as well as a “flux mode” which records your movements on the ribbon continuously. In that sense, it is limited, and is an instrument made to be played with your hands, rather than be programmed. But as it turned out, this was a design choice, and not a technical limitation. I can easily imagine why. They wanted it to seem as analog and playful as possible. Same thing with MIDI. Officially, the monotribe doesn’t support MIDI. It does however offer a sync pulse output and input. This allows it to be synced to other monotribes, modular synthesizers or even Korg’s own virtual iMS-20/iElectribe, using a special sync app on a second iPhone/Pod/Pad. However, the lack of MIDI is still a slight limitation.
http://blog.gg8.se/wordpress/2011/08/14/monotribe-midi-and-me/

1014 Nord Modular Tips & Tricks
synth clavia Nord Modular & Micro Modular V3.03 tips & tricks Welcome to the Nord Modular and Micro Modular 'tips and tricks' section! The workshops of this section are created by a very skilled Nord Modular user: Rob Hordijk. On the 'tips and tricks' pages you will find various information regarding sound synthesis techniques. With every topic comes a workshop where you can follow the practical, non-mathematical, musician-oriented examples. The patches are kept as simple as possible showing only the basic connections. So it's up to you to color the tone to your liking, add modulation, etc., thus turning them into musically useful patches. Occasionally there might be a 'professional' patch as a bonus. If you have a Nord Modular or Nord MicroModular synthesizer you can download the example patches directly from the workshops into the Modular Editor V3.03 program and your synth and play with them. Just click on the patch image to download the actual patch to your Modular. If you do not have a Nord Modular you can download the Modular Editor V3.03 software here and check out the patches visually. Another very skilled Nord Modular/G2 user - Roland Kuit - has made the E-Book "SoundLab". This book covers synthesis techniques from A-Z, history of electronic music and composing techniques. For more info about the SoundLab E-Book, please visit: http://rolandkuit.blogspot.com/Topics available: Basics of sound synthesis on the Nord Modular This extensive section describes the basics of synthesis. (By Rob Hordijk) Basic synthesis Oscillator synchronisation This topic covers hardsync, softsync, FM-sync and VOSIM, a special application of sync. (By Rob Hordijk) Sync workshop Frequency Modulation This topic covers different types of FM, like linear FM, Phase Modulation and fixed formant FM. (By Rob Hordijk) FM Workshop Using the delay module It's too short for echos, but it's a valuable tool that can be used in a variety of ways, creating both sound effects as well as physical models of plucked string sounds and resonant bodies. (By Rob Hordijk) Delay Module Workshop Using logic modules Mastering those yellow connections. (By Rob Hordijk) Logic Workshop
http://www.clavia.se/nordmodular/Modularzone/index.html#SyncWorkshop

947 htaccess tester

http://htaccess.madewithlove.be/

865 Evolver.html
Just Beautiful! What an amazing instrument! The DSI Evolver has the signature "old school" timbre down pat as well as being able to provide digital timbres reminiscent of the Waldorf Q. There's certainly a "rougher" side available as well with all the feedback implementation and controled distortion. Being able to make PM type plucked and blown sounds is just icing on the cake. Dave Smith should be commended for a job well done. Just have a look at the Panel Layout to get a taste of what this beauty can dish out - the controls are pretty much laid out in the form of a signal path graphic. Be sure to visit Dave Smith's Website! Evolver Sound Examples There are a lot of demos of the Evolver on the web showcasing the gutsy harsh sounds of this beast so I decided to post demos of some of my own patches as examples of the "softer" more "vintage" side of the Evolver's timbre. I make no apologies for these unpolished recordings - these are merely sound samples ;) Resonant Plucked Pad This pad shows some of the rich resonant nature of the filter. Soft Lead This is a simple analog brass lead patch. FM Pad A fun patch with lots of motion made using my "Audio-rate Filter FM" programming tip below. Warm Pad A nice bland-vanilla pad ^_^ What can I say? I love pads... For more MP3 demos showing the full gamut of sounds the Evolver and Polyevolver are capable of, please visit the excellent website of Stefan Trippler! The Definitive Guide to Evolver This rather in-depth guide to the Evolver goes places and does things a mere manual can't. This labor-of-love was crafted by Anu Kirk and with his kind permission, I am offering this fantastic resource right here in PDF format! A much smaller version (400K) is here but it dosen't have internal hyperlinks. Programming Tips Here's a fun repository of programming tips for the Evolver in all its incarnations. Please email me if you would like to add some. Fingered Wave Sequence Submitted by Dave Bryce. This brilliant technique has to be heard to be believed! Plus, its one of those cool things unique to the Evolver! This particular tip is so full of detailed information that it gets its own page! Audio-rate Filter FM Submitted by James Maier. Use the "Audio Mod" parameter in the Filter section to frequency-modulate the cutoff with the analog oscillator. Add resonance until the filter is just on the edge of oscillation then mod the cutoff with just a little triangle LFO set at a very slow speed. Amazing moving chorusing pad and lead sounds can be made this way. Fatter Bass/Pad Sounds Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the same sound in both channels (detuned saws, for instance). With the filters at the 24dB setting, increasing resonance cuts the passband as on the Moog filters. Set Envelope 3 to minimum attack, maximum decay and release, and sustain to maximum. This "creates" an offset, a continuous "on" signal while the keys are gated. Modulate one filters' resonance up (just one), or of the overall resonance level is high, us it to modulate one filters' resonance to its minimum. You get the resonant character plus the size of the non-resonant filter. Use Tri and Sine waves on that side too. "Warmer" Sounds Submitted by James Maier. The Evolver can make many ultra-bright and buzzy sounds due to its extensive feedback and distortion stages but sometimes people miss the subtler side of the beast. For a warmer sound use little or no distortion, close the filter just a bit and turn off the feedback and delay lines. I've managed to get dead-on Prophet5 timbres this way. Adding "Punch" Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the envelopes to linear, and use a Mod to modulate AmpEnv All by itself (lin through log responses with positive and negative self-modulation). This is of course fun on the filter envelopes as well. More Vintage Character Submitted by Mike Peake. Oscillator Slop, set at 5, doesn't come close to the Moog and other old-timer movement, so add slight (1 or 2) LFO to pitch modulations, with individual LFOs per oscillator, and a touch of LFO to LFO rate modulation. A tad of Envelope 3 to pitch helps as well. Don't miss out on the 12dB filter setting Submitted by Mike Peake. The 24dB setting has much more resonance, but the 12dB setting can sound nice and plucky, and do nice slightly fuzzy pads etc. DSI Evolver Waveshape Charts Below are charts I've assembled of the digital waveforms and their spectra as currently used in the DSI Evolver synthesizers. Originally these waves were unique to the SCI ProphetVS vector synth. I find these waveform/spectra graphics really usefull when programming sounds - maybe you will as well. Pay special attention to the spectra as this info is sometimes much more useful than waveshape in determining actual timbre - even before you hear what the waveform sounds like. These are designed to be downloaded (right-click & "save target as"), and printed at 300dpi on 8.5" x 11" pages - don't resize these images before printing or you will lose useful detail. Use them as a handy refrence. This information was cobbled together from various scattered sources (with very special thanks to Achim Gratz!). Any errors or omissions are my own. ^_^ HAVE FUN!!! Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 As far as the origin of these waves is concerned, one of the original VS engineers, Chris Meyer, said: "The original waves for the VS were created three ways - extracting single-cycles from sampled sounds, using a custom additive synthesis program, and using a program Josh (Josh Jeffe, another VS engineer) slapped together called "Hacker" where you could draw the waveshape. These were fed straight from the computer through the filter and VCA of a Pro-One to figure out what they might sound like in a patch. And by the way, no PPG waveforms appear inside the VS - we had access to them, but in the end our consciences got the better of us. We did steal some waveforms from the Korg DW6000, but only by looking at the harmonic drawings on the front panel and trying to imitate them in our additive synthesis program." Modulation Matrix "Cheat Sheet" This chart shows all the modulation routing available on the Evolver. This same info is available in the manual but this can be printed on a single sheet of paper as a handy refrence! Evolver Wallpaper These I created just for fun and desktop "beautification" ;) 1280 X 1024 1024 X 768 800 X 600
http://www.carbon111.com/evolver.html

835 Monotron++
Electrical DIY Note for sounds Analogue Ribbon Synthesizer KORG beatnic music DIY amature hand made mod Circuit Bending Toy
http://beatnic.jp/monotron/V2.html

825 What is the smallest thing you have done that has made a ranking difference? Google SEO News and Discussion forum at WebmasterWorld
what is the smallest thing you have done that has made a ranking difference? what,smallest,thing,have,done,that,made,ranking,difference,google,news,discussion,google,webmaster,WebmasterWorld
http://www.webmasterworld.com/google/4244442.htm

788 Setting Up Your Digital Camera For HDR Shooting
You’ve probably heard of High Dynamic Range (HDR) Photography, it’s made quite an entrance into the world of digital photography. If you haven’t, the HDR process is accomplished by taking multiple exposures of a high contrast scene (usually a landscape or cityscape), at different levels of brightness, and then combining the best light from each exposure into one image. The end result is a stunning image that very closely resembles how the human eye views a scene. This process of digital manipulation has caused a bit of controversy and debate in the world of photography, especially with images that are “over-cooked.” One thing is for sure though, HDR is here to stay. When done right, this unique and in depth processing technique can produce beautiful works of art that mimic the way we view and remember a landscape or scene. The above image is an example of what HDR processing can produce. This image, taken from the Big Island of Hawaii, would not be possible without HDR processing. It was taken around noon, the harshest light of the day. The first image is the best image my camera could produce given the situation. While still beautiful, there are obvious problems. Get ready, this article is going to show you how to take your digital camera and turn it into an HDR shooting machine!
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/setting-up-your-digital-camera-for-hdr-shooting

727 How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect | Apartment Therapy DC
How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect Mclain Wiesand, a Baltimore-based custom furniture company, has made a name for itself by producing handcrafted pieces that capture the feel of real antiques. One of the techniques they use for aging mirror is wonderfully simple and serves as the inspiration for this how to. Creating an antique mirror effect is an inexpensive way to revamp a flea market find, or add a new layer of interest and depth to an ordinary wall mirror. Almost any type of mirror can be aged using this technique, including mirrored plexiglass. Supplies • Mirrored glass or plexiglass. Due to the type of paint applied to the reflective coating, inexpensive, craft-store mirror works wonderfully. • Latex or other gloves for hand protection. • Paint stripper. Most types work fine. For a less toxic product, Citristrip works well. • Plastic putty spreader or putty knife. • Modern Masters Metal Effects Black Patina. This patina solution is essentially an acid that eats at the reflective surface of the mirror. There are probably other products that work similarly, but Modern Masters products work well and can be found online or in most art supply stores or specialty paint stores. • 1” chip brush (or similar brush). • Silver paint of choice. Steps Step 1: (Image 2, above) Wearing gloves, place mirror face down on cardboard or other protected surface in a well-ventilated area. Apply stripper generously to back of mirror and allow to sit for a few hours, or until paint can be easily removed with plastic scraper. It is not necessary for all of the paint to be removed; generally speaking, 80-90% should suffice. When paint has been stripped, wash mirror with soap and water and allow to dry. Step 2: (Images 3 & 4) Place stripped mirror face down on clean cardboard or other protected surface. Dip chip brush in Modern Masters Metal Patina Solution and gradually apply it to the raw reflective surface of the mirror. As mirror tends to age from the edges inward, it is best to apply patina solution in heavier amounts around the edges of the mirror. In a matter of minutes (or less), the patina solution will begin to eat away at the reflective surface. Other application techniques that produce nice effects are spattering and light directional brushing of patina solution. Continue applying solution until desired level of ageing is achieved. Rinse with water to neutralize the reaction and allow to dry. Step 3: (photos 5 & 6) This next step involves reapplying paint to the back of the mirror. The color paint you choose will be visible through the spots created by the patina solution. The dark areas of aged antique mirrors tend to be a dark silver-grey but depending on the silvering technique used, can range from gold to pale silver to black. One method that produced nice results is a combination of dark and light silver paints, applied randomly (per images). Apply paint until the reflective surface is completely covered.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/how-to/how-to-create-an-antique-mirror-effect-127227

714 30 free programming eBooks « citizen428.blog()
Since this post got quite popular I decided to incorporate some of the excellent suggestions posted in the comments, so this list now has more than 40 books in it. [UPDATED: 2010-10-12] Learning a new programming language always is fun and there are many great books legally available for free online. Here’s a selection of 30 of them: Lisp/Scheme: How to Desing Programs Interpreting Lisp (PDF, suggested by Gary Knott) Let Over Lambda On Lisp Practical Common Lisp Programming in Emacs Lisp Programming Languages. Application and Interpretation (suggested by Alex Ott) Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days Visual LISP Developer’s Bible (suggested by “skatterbrainz”) Ruby: Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Design Patterns in Ruby Learn to Program MacRuby: The Definitive Guide Mr. Neighborly’s Humble Little Ruby Book (suggested by @tundal45) Programming Ruby Read Ruby 1.9 Ruby Best Practices Ruby on Rails Tutorial Book (suggested by @tundal45) Javascript: Building iPhone Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Eloquent Javascript jQuery Fundamentals Mastering Node Haskell: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good Real World Haskell Erlang: Concurrent Programming in Erlang Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good Python: Dive into Python How to Think Like a Computer Scientist – Learning with Python Smalltalk: Dynamic Web Development with Seaside Pharo by Example (based on the next book in this list, suggested by Anonymous) Squeak by Example Misc: Algorithms The Art of Assembly Language Beginning Perl Building Accessible Websites (suggested by Joe Clark) The C Book C# Yellow Book (suggested by Joe Wyatt) Compiler Construction Dive Into HTML 5 (suggested by @til) Higher-Order Perl The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages (suggested by “Def”) An Introduction to R Learn Prolog Now! Objective-C 2.0 Essentials Programming Scala Of course there are many more free programming eBooks, but this list consists of the ones I read or want(ed) to read. This is far from comprehensive and languages that are completely missing are mostly left out on purpose (e.g. PHP, C++, Java). I’m sure somebody else made a list for them somewhere.
http://citizen428.net/archives/434

679 Trevor Marshall's ETI3600, ETI4600 International Music Synthesisers and Maplin 3800 and Maplin 5600s Stereo Synthesisers
Many years ago the Australian magazine "Electronics Today International" published my designs for two partly digital, mostly analog, Electronic Music Synthesisers. the ETI 3600 and ETI 4600. Both were made available as kits of components Barry Wilkinson at ETI was responsible for the final packaging and kitting coordination. Maplin Electronics Ltd.(in the UK) subsequently picked up the designs, which they marketed as as the Maplin models 3800 and 5600s Electronic Music Synthesisers At the time I held two Australian provisional patents for the technologies I used in the Synthesiser designs. One related to the method for generating sawtooth waveforms, the other was for the method of using commutated resistors in voltage controlled filters. I never made any money out of the designs, or the patents, which have long ago been allowed to lapse. But it was fun! The original constructional articles for the ETI 3600/4600 can be found in these PDFs: October 1973, December 1973, January 1974, Feb 1974, March 1974, April 1974, July 1974, March 1975, April 1975, May 1975, August 1975 Although the earliest (4004) microprocessors were available at that time, it was not until the late-70's that I first started programming fully digital (Signetics 2650 based) Microcomputer systems. Consequently my early digital designs were hardware, and not firmware, based. Of course, these days, everything in my hardware and firmware is based on software designs - even the interconnections are controlled by the software in the EPLDs and PALs, instead of by wires. So many things have changed over the years.... Here is a mug shot of the Maplin 3800:
http://www.trevormarshall.com/eti.htm

647 Brady Cases – Custom Made Road Cases, Guitar Cases, Pedalboards, and More
Brady Cases builds the best custom guitar cases, merchandise cases, and road cases. Protect your instruments, amps, pedals, and gear with a Brady Case. Guitar Cases,Road Cases,ATA Cases,Instrument Cases,Keyword Cases,AMP Cases,Merchandise Cases,Custom Cases,Band Gear Cases,Pedalboard Cases
http://www.bradycases.com/

565 Inside Alesis A6 Andromeda | Ibsendesign blog
Inside Alesis A6 Andromeda Here are some pics I’ve shot during the reconnaissance inside my A6 (taking some measures before pimping it with some custom made wooden cheeks). It’s quite surprising that its guts are not that complicated as it may seem looking at it’s interface. Very clean layout and good engineering (with tons of silicone glue, WTF?). The only con is that in order to remove those original cheeks I have to disassemble all the PCB’s attached to the front panel – and probably all the pots! Teh drama.
http://www.blog.ibsendesign.pl/?p=81

551 The Top Idea in Your Mind
I realized recently that what one thinks about in the shower in the morning is more important than I'd thought. I knew it was a good time to have ideas. Now I'd go further: now I'd say it's hard to do a really good job on anything you don't think about in the shower. Everyone who's worked on difficult problems is probably familiar with the phenomenon of working hard to figure something out, failing, and then suddenly seeing the answer a bit later while doing something else. There's a kind of thinking you do without trying to. I'm increasingly convinced this type of thinking is not merely helpful in solving hard problems, but necessary. The tricky part is, you can only control it indirectly. [1] I think most people have one top idea in their mind at any given time. That's the idea their thoughts will drift toward when they're allowed to drift freely. And this idea will thus tend to get all the benefit of that type of thinking, while others are starved of it. Which means it's a disaster to let the wrong idea become the top one in your mind. What made this clear to me was having an idea I didn't want as the top one in my mind for two long stretches.
http://www.paulgraham.com/top.html

457 HomeMadeSynth
DIY analog synth
http://www.aleph.co.jp/~takeda/radio/homemadesynthE.html

441 How To Become a Millionaire In Three Years | Jason L. Baptiste
/* This was originally a comment made in response to a hacker news thread titled:  Ask HN: How to become a millionaire in 3 years? .  The comment has over must reads,startups
http://jasonlbaptiste.com/startups/how-to-become-a-millionaire-in-three-years/

440 A List Apart: Articles: Taking Advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 with Modernizr
Ten years ago, only the most cutting-edge web designers used CSS for layouts and styling. Browser support for CSS layouts was slim and buggy, so these people advocated for web standards adherence, while creating hacks that made CSS layouts work in all browsers. One hack that became widely used was browser sniffing: Detecting which browser and version the user had by looking at the navigator.userAgent property in JavaScript. Browser sniffing allowed for quick and easy code forking, allowing developers to target different browsers with different instructions. Today, CSS-based layouts are commonplace and every browser has pretty solid support for them. But now we have CSS3 and HTML5, and the situation is repeating itself—different browsers demonstrate varying levels of support for these new technologies. We’ve smartened up, however, and no longer employ CSS hacks nor use browser sniffing—an unreliable, poor practice. We’ve also convinced more and more clients that websites don’t need to look exactly the same in every browser. So how do we deal with this new but familiar problem? Simple: We use feature detection, which means that we do not ask the browser “who are you?” and make unreliable assumptions from there on. Instead we ask the browser, “can you do this and that?” It’s a simple way to test browser capabilities, but doing all these tests manually all the time gets tiresome. To solve that problem (and others), you can use Modernizr.
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/taking-advantage-of-html5-and-css3-with-modernizr/

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front … if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant Donnés, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

426 steampunk brass synthesizer blows my mind on [technabob]
I always thought analog synthesizers were inherently retro. Just not quite this retro. This unbelievable steampunk modular synthesizer features tons of dials and intricate brass etching throughout. All of the buttons and knobs were hand lathed, and the synth includes a number of antique parts as well. audio, geek art + craft, retro, strange + wonderful, technology, analog, brass, handmade, music, sound, steampunk, synthesizer
http://technabob.com/blog/2009/06/26/steampunk-brass-synthesizer-blows-my-mind/

416 Welcome to the Modular Corner
Welcome to the Modular Corner! This site is intended as a resource for all users of the Pulsar / Scope Modular synth, a software synthesizer which comes with the Scope range of soundcards from Sonic Core (formerly Creamware). Here you will find information about the Modular Synth, it's various components, the many patches that are available for the Synth along with other related documents and links to do with all things Modular. On the Patches page, you will find information about individual patches that have been created for the Modular. This aims to be a complete listing of all the Modular patches that have become available, with a brief description of the patch. Where possible this will include a more detailed description, mp3 examples, signal flow diagrams, etc, in order to build up a more comprehensive 'manual' for the many patches that are available. The downloads page has other related resources, such as freeware modules, documents on modular synthesis, etc. Your contributions are vital - If you made a patch that you're proud of, or if you've downloaded someone else's that you like - let me know. I can't write up every patch on my own.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/index.html

369 How to Install Mac OS X on a PC (Without Using a Mac)
There are many great tutorials on the web for using a Mac to install Mac OS X Snow Leopard on a PC. Unfortunately, you may be unable to follow such tutorials if you do not readily have access to a Mac to perform the preparation necessary for the installation. Great progress has been made in hacking PCs to run OS X, and it is now possible to install Mac OS X without a Mac. Thanks to some great tools put together by some brilliant hackers, it is also much easier and does not involve nearly as much time and effort as was once required.
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-install-mac-os-x-on-a-pc-without-using-a-mac/

336 Change of Address: 20 Ways to Get to Know Your Neighbors
Being the new family on the block can be hard, especially if you’re even remotely shy. It can be hard to make friends, made even harder by the fact that almost everyone in the community already has their own group of friends. Still, there are lots of ways you can connect with them and it’s worth the effort required as there are several advantages to getting to know your neighbors. Whether it’s having someone to watch your home while you are on vacation or a helping hand when you desperately need one. Here are some tips to help you break the ice with your new neighbors
http://www.changeofaddress.org/blog/2010/20-ways-to-get-to-know-your-neighbors/

334 55 Minimal Black and White Web Designs to Inspire You | Inspiration
We already showed here a list of Yellow Web Designs and one of Blue Web Designs, but today is all about black and white. The B&W combination is great, from photography to interior design to clothes, black and white is always a good choice. Here we will show you some sites that made a very good use of this duo... Beautiful, elegant and clean pages, you will notice that sometimes having no colors around is also a very good option. Some of the pages have a detail or something in colors, but their general idea is b&w. black,clean,design,inspiration,web design,white
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/55-minimal-black-and-white-web-designs-to-inspire-you

303 View topic - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D
Instruments - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:14 pm Post subject: Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D I've found this site: http://homepage.mac.com/s...ds_cs15mod.html I've made mod in my CS30 - faster LFO speed... anyway? I know circuit in cs30 is diffrent. anyway i was wonderin howto get 24db lopass? JarreYuri - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:05 pm I don't know... yet. But I just wanted to say that I would soooo much want to have that synth You have. Congratulations! Which version do You have? radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:22 pm I had 3 versions: - Yamaha CS30L - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 6 or 8 steps - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 1 to 8 steps sold first two
http://216.70.103.199/forum/printview.php?t=4294&start=0&sid=120d9a0ab733b5531ff4e0e0473aca14

256 Geocities-izer - Make Any Webpage Look Like It Was Made By A 13 Year-Old In 1996
Make Any Webpage Look Like It Was Made By A 13 Year-Old In 1996. Geocities, web design, animated gifs, marquee tag, blink tag, midi music
http://wonder-tonic.com/geocitiesizer/

250 55 Minimal Black and White Web Designs to Inspire You | Inspiration
We already showed here a list of Yellow Web Designs and one of Blue Web Designs, but today is all about black and white. The B&W combination is great, from photography to interior design to clothes, black and white is always a good choice. Here we will show you some sites that made a very good use of this duo... Beautiful, elegant and clean pages, you will notice that sometimes having no colors around is also a very good option. Some of the pages have a detail or something in colors, but their general idea is b&w. black,clean,design,inspiration,web design,white
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/55-minimal-black-and-white-web-designs-to-inspire-you/

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/01/alesis-andromeda-aurora.html

229 Typography Is Important - Well-Made Magazine - Techmic Studios
Typography is the art of arranging type and type design. The arrangement of type involves the selection of typefaces, point size, line length, line spacing, and the adjustment of spaces between groups of letters (tracking) and between pairs of letters (kerning). Typography comes from the Greek words typos, which means “mark, figure” and grapho, which means “I write.” It is basically the discipline of shaping written information; thus it can be applied to anything which has to do with text, including web design. Authors write the text, designers and typographers manage the typography, and users read through it.
http://www.techmic.com/magazine/issue-1/typography-is-important/

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