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1408 » Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Animodule.com
Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Here’s a quick photodoc of how I made a reusable SMT stencil from some aluminum siding I had laying around. It’s very simple to assemble and works great. Dirt cheap too. I had picked up a roll of aluminum flashing a few years ago to flash some chimneys I rebuilt/repointed and was curious to see how it would hold up as an SMT stencil. To buy an SMT stencil frame is near $1000 so I didn’t have much to lose if it didn’t work out. I cut the frame out of some birch plywood since I had some handy. Really any sturdy frame would do the trick. You could easily glue one together out of some 1x or trim board. I put a thicker sheet of aluminum down underneath the flashing to give the CNC endmill something sturdy to cut against and clamped it down stretched and tight. My thought there was that If I cut straight on the MDF it might push on the flashing and bend it before it cut through. A 1mm endmill did the trick. Each pass was .05mm deep. I pulled the Flashing tight and stapled it to the frame. No rocket science here. I taped up the inside edges so no solderpaste could squeeze between the frame and the stencil. I had some old screen print hinge boards so I just attached this frame the same way I would a screen print stencil. The only fiddly part was aligning the first PCB. You have to push around a little and lift the stencil and fiddle with it a little bit. Once I get all the pads lined up correctly I hold it in place and trace around it with a thin tip sharpie marker. Then you place the PCB in the outline. If you have the height adjusted correctly the stencil is sturdy enough to hold the PCB in place while you print the Solderpaste on it. just hold the stencil frame down and it pushes down on the PCB. I used a flexible putty knife as a squeegee. It worked fine. Cleanup was a breeze. Just scrape it off, unscrew the stencil frame from the hingeboard and stick it in the corner till you are ready to do another run.
http://www.animodule.com/diy-2/cut-simple-smt-stencil-from-common-aluminum-flashing-on-your-cnc/

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1256 Sony | Vintage Electronics Have Soul – The Pocket Calculator Show Website
We owe much gratitude to Sony, for they were responsible for making the personal stereo cassette player a reality. For over 25 years, Sony has been bringing a personal, portable stereo music experience to our ears–creativity and innovation have continued to make Walkman a useful product to everyone. Walkman has reached pop icon status and become a symbol of youth, individuality and freedom. In 1979 Sony warned, “Remember the name: Walkman.” How could we forget?
http://pocketcalculatorshow.com/walkman/sony/

1254 SONY TC-D5 Pro II, an impressive machine
Hi there, I received yesterday a SONT TC-D5 Pro II. I have seen it in photos and read comments about its quality, similar to the D6C. I liked so much the design with the two VU meters, and it seemed to me that it belongs to an era when build quality was driven by other rules.
http://www.stereo2go.com/displayForumTopic/content/284032791466040094?reply=288255372213350915

1109 Weekend with the Ricoh GRDIV |
I’ve fielded a lot of questions lately about Ricoh’s latest camera, the GRDIV. Honestly, it was getting a little tedious hearing about it haha. Although I suppose I understand considering there’s hardly anything written about it anywhere. I’ve been having a bit of a love affair with Ricoh’s film cameras the last little while so I hadn’t thought much about the GRDIV. After having a chance to get one though, I decided it a good idea to give it a go.
http://jtinseoul.wordpress.com/2011/11/06/weekend-with-the-ricoh-grdiv/

1052 Lab Overview
Not that I recommend this level of excitement to everyone, but this is my lab. It is my basement, and as you may note from the disheveled ceiling tiles up above, having this much equipment has actually forced me to purchase a separate AC unit for the basement. So my trendy two-zone AC house has now magically become a three-zone AC house. Fortunately, I didn't need a furnace for down here. Equipment is great in the winter to heat your house! The lab has taken on a life of it's own over time... It started out as a single standard 7-foot 19" rack. Then it grew to two standard racks... Then it changed into three Ortronics Mighty-Mo 19" rack systems (because those are cool). As seen now, it has changed yet again into four separate rack cabinets. The cabinets are a bit pricey, so they aren't all the same vendor. Note to all, even if you find a really good price on Ebay, be aware that you still have to ship them, and they weigh a LOT! (This means, have lots of friends and lots of pizza/beer!) Nov'04 -- Well, things have moved even more! The equipment was beating the AC unit that ran for the basement. So instead of being a three-level, three-zone house, we had to upgrade to being a four-zone house. Go figure. As noted above, I would not recommend this path to anyone unless you have a good amount of business to drive it! All of the equipment here is used for testing and lab purposes, but easily serves as Proof of Concept lab for many consulting clients of mine. The recent change was that the crawlspace area under the kitchen area was excavated out and had a concrete floor poured making an enclosed little room. In addition, a large air handler (AKA Mongo AC Unit) was put into that specific room and a door was installed for access and physical separation! While all a very interesting project, it is a pain to move any equipment that you amass, so definitely plan ahead for this sort of activity!
http://smorris.uber-geek.net/lab.htm

1050 Frieze Magazine | Comment | Conrad Schnitzler
In the early 1960s, Conrad Schnitzler met Joseph Beuys in a bar in Düsseldorf. Beuys was at the start of his legendary run as a professor of ‘monumental sculpture’ at Düsseldorf’s Kunstakademie. Schnitzler was a sailor, who specialized in fixing the engines of merchant ships in nearby ports. Beuys took a liking to Schnitzler, inviting him to be one of his students. Schnitzler enrolled at the Kunstakademie, but dropped out a year or two later, much to Beuys’ dismay. If, as Beuys famously entreated, ‘everybody is an artist’, why did he have to go to school to be one? Schnitzler travelled for a few years, making metal sculptures and performance art. Then he took the metal sculptures he built during his time with Beuys, which he had covered in stark planes of black and white paint, dragged them all to a grassy field, and left them there.
http://www.frieze.com/comment/article/conrad-schnitzler/

1010 PowerFX Vocaloid 2 Sweet Ann
Yamaha’s Vocaloid technology has now been upgraded to version 2 and Sweet Ann, from PowerFX, is the first virtual singer based on the new release. So just how much further forward have Yamaha moved their intriguing vocal synthesis technology? software, review, PowerFX, Vocaloid 2, Sweet Ann, Singing Synthesis, PC, John Walden, Yamaha, Vocaloid, technology, virtual singer, vocal synthesis, real-time, VST Instrument
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan08/articles/sweetann.htm

897 Generic Synth Preset Storage and Conversion
For my synths with preset storage and the ability to dump & load presets via midi sysex, I wanted to be able to feed the sysex of a synth into a software program which can display the sound parameters in a meaningful form, and convert the sound into the sysex format of any of my other presets synths The generic patch storage format must display meaningful values for the parameters (filter envelope amount = 1/2 octave, envelope 1 attack = 50ms, etc) and convert between these values and a given synth's sysex (as much as possible - resolution probably isn't good enough to get envelope attack to exactly 50ms on each and every synth, and envelope shapes vary between synths, etc). The storage format will also store the original parameters, using the "native" value range of each parameter (e.g. filter cutoff frequency between 0 and 127) as well as the original sysex program as an ASCII hex dump. Since I didn't find any software which could do this, I began writing my own in Java. I am concentrating on converting basic analog components; any on-board effects are not used.
http://www.nmrailrunners.org/synth/gpc/index.html

865 Evolver.html
Just Beautiful! What an amazing instrument! The DSI Evolver has the signature "old school" timbre down pat as well as being able to provide digital timbres reminiscent of the Waldorf Q. There's certainly a "rougher" side available as well with all the feedback implementation and controled distortion. Being able to make PM type plucked and blown sounds is just icing on the cake. Dave Smith should be commended for a job well done. Just have a look at the Panel Layout to get a taste of what this beauty can dish out - the controls are pretty much laid out in the form of a signal path graphic. Be sure to visit Dave Smith's Website! Evolver Sound Examples There are a lot of demos of the Evolver on the web showcasing the gutsy harsh sounds of this beast so I decided to post demos of some of my own patches as examples of the "softer" more "vintage" side of the Evolver's timbre. I make no apologies for these unpolished recordings - these are merely sound samples ;) Resonant Plucked Pad This pad shows some of the rich resonant nature of the filter. Soft Lead This is a simple analog brass lead patch. FM Pad A fun patch with lots of motion made using my "Audio-rate Filter FM" programming tip below. Warm Pad A nice bland-vanilla pad ^_^ What can I say? I love pads... For more MP3 demos showing the full gamut of sounds the Evolver and Polyevolver are capable of, please visit the excellent website of Stefan Trippler! The Definitive Guide to Evolver This rather in-depth guide to the Evolver goes places and does things a mere manual can't. This labor-of-love was crafted by Anu Kirk and with his kind permission, I am offering this fantastic resource right here in PDF format! A much smaller version (400K) is here but it dosen't have internal hyperlinks. Programming Tips Here's a fun repository of programming tips for the Evolver in all its incarnations. Please email me if you would like to add some. Fingered Wave Sequence Submitted by Dave Bryce. This brilliant technique has to be heard to be believed! Plus, its one of those cool things unique to the Evolver! This particular tip is so full of detailed information that it gets its own page! Audio-rate Filter FM Submitted by James Maier. Use the "Audio Mod" parameter in the Filter section to frequency-modulate the cutoff with the analog oscillator. Add resonance until the filter is just on the edge of oscillation then mod the cutoff with just a little triangle LFO set at a very slow speed. Amazing moving chorusing pad and lead sounds can be made this way. Fatter Bass/Pad Sounds Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the same sound in both channels (detuned saws, for instance). With the filters at the 24dB setting, increasing resonance cuts the passband as on the Moog filters. Set Envelope 3 to minimum attack, maximum decay and release, and sustain to maximum. This "creates" an offset, a continuous "on" signal while the keys are gated. Modulate one filters' resonance up (just one), or of the overall resonance level is high, us it to modulate one filters' resonance to its minimum. You get the resonant character plus the size of the non-resonant filter. Use Tri and Sine waves on that side too. "Warmer" Sounds Submitted by James Maier. The Evolver can make many ultra-bright and buzzy sounds due to its extensive feedback and distortion stages but sometimes people miss the subtler side of the beast. For a warmer sound use little or no distortion, close the filter just a bit and turn off the feedback and delay lines. I've managed to get dead-on Prophet5 timbres this way. Adding "Punch" Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the envelopes to linear, and use a Mod to modulate AmpEnv All by itself (lin through log responses with positive and negative self-modulation). This is of course fun on the filter envelopes as well. More Vintage Character Submitted by Mike Peake. Oscillator Slop, set at 5, doesn't come close to the Moog and other old-timer movement, so add slight (1 or 2) LFO to pitch modulations, with individual LFOs per oscillator, and a touch of LFO to LFO rate modulation. A tad of Envelope 3 to pitch helps as well. Don't miss out on the 12dB filter setting Submitted by Mike Peake. The 24dB setting has much more resonance, but the 12dB setting can sound nice and plucky, and do nice slightly fuzzy pads etc. DSI Evolver Waveshape Charts Below are charts I've assembled of the digital waveforms and their spectra as currently used in the DSI Evolver synthesizers. Originally these waves were unique to the SCI ProphetVS vector synth. I find these waveform/spectra graphics really usefull when programming sounds - maybe you will as well. Pay special attention to the spectra as this info is sometimes much more useful than waveshape in determining actual timbre - even before you hear what the waveform sounds like. These are designed to be downloaded (right-click & "save target as"), and printed at 300dpi on 8.5" x 11" pages - don't resize these images before printing or you will lose useful detail. Use them as a handy refrence. This information was cobbled together from various scattered sources (with very special thanks to Achim Gratz!). Any errors or omissions are my own. ^_^ HAVE FUN!!! Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 As far as the origin of these waves is concerned, one of the original VS engineers, Chris Meyer, said: "The original waves for the VS were created three ways - extracting single-cycles from sampled sounds, using a custom additive synthesis program, and using a program Josh (Josh Jeffe, another VS engineer) slapped together called "Hacker" where you could draw the waveshape. These were fed straight from the computer through the filter and VCA of a Pro-One to figure out what they might sound like in a patch. And by the way, no PPG waveforms appear inside the VS - we had access to them, but in the end our consciences got the better of us. We did steal some waveforms from the Korg DW6000, but only by looking at the harmonic drawings on the front panel and trying to imitate them in our additive synthesis program." Modulation Matrix "Cheat Sheet" This chart shows all the modulation routing available on the Evolver. This same info is available in the manual but this can be printed on a single sheet of paper as a handy refrence! Evolver Wallpaper These I created just for fun and desktop "beautification" ;) 1280 X 1024 1024 X 768 800 X 600
http://www.carbon111.com/evolver.html

767 The 5 types of programmers « Steven Benner's Blog
In my code journeys and programming adventures I’ve encountered many strange foes, and even stranger allies. I’ve identified at least five different kinds of code warriors, some make for wonderful comrades in arms, while others seem to foil my every plan. However they all have their place in the pantheon of software development. Without a healthy mix of these different programming styles you’ll probably find your projects either take too long to complete, are not stable enough or are too perfect for humans to look upon. The duct tape programmer The code may not be pretty, but damnit, it works! This guy is the foundation of your company. When something goes wrong he will fix it fast and in a way that won’t break again. Of course he doesn’t care about how it looks, ease of use, or any of those other trivial concerns, but he will make it happen, without a bunch of talk or time-wasting nonsense. The best way to use this person is to point at a problem and walk away. The OCD perfectionist programmer You want to do what to my code? This guy doesn’t care about your deadlines or budgets, those are insignificant when compared to the art form that is programming. When you do finally receive the finished product you will have no option but submit to the stunning glory and radiant beauty of perfectly formatted, no, perfectly beautiful code, that is so efficient that anything you would want to do to it would do nothing but defame a masterpiece. He is the only one qualified to work on his code. The anti-programming programmer I’m a programmer, damnit. I don’t write code. His world has one simple truth; writing code is bad. If you have to write something then you’re doing it wrong. Someone else has already done the work so just use their code. He will tell you how much faster this development practice is, even though he takes as long or longer than the other programmers. But when you get the project it will only be 20 lines of actual code and will be very easy to read. It may not be very fast, efficient, or forward-compatible, but it will be done with the least effort required. The half-assed programmer What do you want? It works doesn’t it? The guy who couldn’t care less about quality, that’s someone elses job. He accomplishes the tasks that he’s asked to do, quickly. You may not like his work, the other programmers hate it, but management and the clients love it. As much pain as he will cause you in the future, he is single-handedly keeping your deadlines so you can’t scoff at it (no matter how much you want to). The theoretical programmer Well, that’s a possibility, but in practice this might be a better alternative. This guy is more interested the options than what should be done. He will spend 80% of his time staring blankly at his computer thinking up ways to accomplish a task, 15% of his time complaining about unreasonable deadlines, 4% of his time refining the options, and 1% of his time writing code. When you receive the final work it will always be accompanied by the phrase “if I had more time I could have done this the right way”. Where do you fit? Personally, I’d have to classify myself as the perfectionist. So, which type of programmer are you? Or perhaps you know another programming archetype that is missing from my list? Post a comment below and I’ll add it to a new updated list.
http://stevenbenner.com/2010/07/the-5-types-of-programmers/

704 What Is User Experience Design? Overview, Tools And Resources - Smashing Magazine
Websites and Web applications have become progressively more complex as our industry’s technologies and methodologies advance. What used to be a one-way static medium has evolved into a very rich and interactive experience. But regardless of how much has changed in the production process, a website’s success still hinges on just one thing: how users perceive it. “Does this website give me value? Is it easy to use? Is it pleasant to use?” These are the questions that run through the minds of visitors as they interact with our products, and they form the basis of their decisions on whether to become regular users. User experience design is all about striving to make them answer “Yes” to all of those questions. This guide aims to familiarize you with the professional discipline of UX design in the context of Web-based systems such as websites and applications. [Offtopic: by the way, did you know that we are publishing a Smashing eBook Series? The brand new eBook #3 is Mastering Photoshop For Web Design, written by our Photoshop-expert Thomas Giannattasio.]
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/10/05/what-is-user-experience-design-overview-tools-and-resources/

637 50 List of Free Online Photo Editing Tools | blueblots.com
Editing an image is very popular these days due to the innovation of graphic software programs that will allow us to create computer arts from scratch. However, we could also enhance, add some cool effects and customize the look of our images easily without having the need of these soft wares through the online photo editors. An online photo editor tool allows us to edit and manipulate a photo in the Web Browser. This is more advantageous compared to the softwares for editing an image as this could not consume much of the memory of your desktop and the processing is done faster by the server. With just a few clicks, we could now be able to customize our own photos, create funny photos from our pictures or even feature ourselves in a magazine cover like that of a celebrity. Here are the 50 List of Photo Editing Tools to Help You Edit Images and Photos Online for free. Try to check and get your best pick!
http://blueblots.com/tools/50-list-of-free-online-photo-editing-tools/

616 Alphabet Soup modular synth
The STS Serge Modular can be a daunting system at first blush, especially for those who come from an "East Coast" modular synth background. My first synthesizers were Moog analogs and my first Analog Modular Synth was an Arrick "Dotcom" system - so I started out with East Coast paradigms that I had to "unlearn" in order to use my Serge Modular to the fullest. For those of you coming from a similar background or those just discovering the Serge Modular for the first time, these "Alphabet Soup" pages are dedicated to you! The Serge Modular is intuitive and fun to use - especially when you realize the main difference between a Serge Modular and most others has to do with the size of the building blocks, where a Moog or similar modular will have monolithic building blocks like ADSRs and Oscillators, the Serge can be more "low-level" in that you can build ADSRs and oscillators from Serge modules or, more properly, Function Blocks. These Function Blocks usually come bearing arcane names that have been shortened to an "Alphabet Soup" conglomeration of acronyms. In this series of articles, I'll be talking about some of the ways to approach these Function Blocks to create much more useful, surprising, complex or just simply fun synthesis features. The first function block we're going to look at is the "DSG", otherwise known as the Dual Universal Slope Generator. This mild-mannered module is in some ways the most powerful one in the entire Serge catalog because it can become so many different things depending on where you place the patch cords...as you'll soon see.
http://www.carbon111.com/alphabet1.html

547 Din Sync: How to modify a Korg Monotron
So here's how to modify Korg's new Monotron analog ribbon synthesizer. Perhaps this is the first document of Monotron mods in Europe since it still hasn't been released here. It's actually a very easy machine to modify because for whatever reason Korg decided to label all the interesting points on the bottom side of the PCB. This may well have been for testing units at the factory/service centers. Perhaps though it could have been that the designers anticipated this little machine would be hacked, much like the Gakken which pretty obviously inspired this piece. Incidentally in the magazine that comes with the Gakken there's a picture of them showing it to Korg, that was in 2008, go figure.
http://www.dinsync.info/2010/06/how-to-modify-korg-monotron.html

529 SynthesisWorkshops
synth modular Sound synthesis and sound design Music has brought pleasure and entertainment to mankind throughout the whole of history. Each person is by nature equipped with one of the most elaborate and emotional musical instruments; the human voice. Whenever people feel good music seems to fit the occasion, and it is considered quite natural to hum or sing a song. Musical instruments have brought their own moods to music and at the current moment in human evolution there is an enormous variety of musical instruments available. The twentieth century has seen the development of a range of new and exciting electronic musical instruments. These electronic instruments are very flexible, they can produce a wide range of timbres and can be amplified to whatever loudness level sounds best for the occasion. Most of these electronic instruments are played by a keyboard, but in essence the keyboard can be replaced by any electromechanical device that is able to transform a movement caused by a human interaction into an electrical signal that can drive the sound generating core of the electronic instrument. All sorts of technical and scientific developments have helped to create electronic instruments and the human interface to play them. Still, music is an art and not really a hard science, although music and sound have for a long time been subject to various scientific research. An important realization is that science can not really explain why much music is such a pleasure to listen to and such a joy to make. Which is not a bad thing, as probably no one is waiting for science to take the fun out of music by applying formalized rules and templates on what is also subject to ‘feel’. So, although this book covers techniques that lean heavily on scientific research, the application of these techniques will in general be aimed at creating fun. There are a lot of professionals working with sound and even more people that make music for their personal enjoyment. Mastery of sound synthesis is valuable to all of them. Still, it won’t be easy to please everyone with one single book, as some people will be more interested in how things work and others might want practical examples that just work. The aim of this book is that it can at least be used as a practical guide in workshops and courses in electronic music, covering some essential basics that are needed to operate the equipment used in sound synthesis in a way that makes some sense. Additionally it can be used to explore techniques to find out how they can help in the development of one’s own musical style. Sound synthesis is the art of creating sounds by using suitable electronic means, using either analog or digital electronic devices. Sound design is the art of creating particular sounds using sound synthesis techniques. The definition of sound design as used here might be confusing to some, as the name sound design is also used in the discipline in industrial design that occupies itself with how mass produced objects should sound. Examples are how the sound of cars or ladyshaves are ‘designed’ to sound pleasing while in use. Which of course has nothing to do at all with music or sound synthesizers. This book puts the emphasis on the various synthesis techniques for musical purposes and how to setup sound synthesizers to create a large range of characteristic musical sounds. The art of musical sound design is left to the artist.
http://www.xs4all.nl/~rhordijk/G2Pages/

474 Why Intelligent People Fail
Why Intelligent People Fail Content from Sternberg, R. (1994). In search of the human mind. New York: Harcourt Brace. 1. Lack of motivation. A talent is irrelevant if a person is not motivated to use it. Motivation may be external (for example, social approval) or internal (satisfaction from a job well-done, for instance). External sources tend to be transient, while internal sources tend to produce more consistent performance. 2. Lack of impulse control. Habitual impulsiveness gets in the way of optimal performance. Some people do not bring their full intellectual resources to bear on a problem but go with the first solution that pops into their heads. 3. Lack of perserverance and perseveration. Some people give up too easily, while others are unable to stop even when the quest will clearly be fruitless. 4. Using the wrong abilities. People may not be using the right abilities for the tasks in which they are engaged. 5. Inability to translate thought into action. Some people seem buried in thought. They have good ideas but rarely seem able to do anything about them. 6. Lack of product orientation. Some people seem more concerned about the process than the result of activity. 7. Inability to complete tasks. For some people nothing ever draws to a close. Perhaps it’s fear of what they would do next or fear of becoming hopelessly enmeshed in detail. 8. Failure to initiate. Still others are unwilling or unable to initiate a project. It may be indecision or fear of commitment. 9. Fear of failure. People may not reach peak performance because they avoid the really important challenges in life. 10. Procrastination. Some people are unable to act without pressure. They may also look for little things to do in order to put off the big ones. 11. Misattribution of blame. Some people always blame themselves for even the slightest mishap. Some always blame others. 12. Excessive self-pity. Some people spend more time feeling sorry for themselves than expending the effort necessary to overcome the problem. 13. Excessive dependency. Some people expect others to do for them what they ought to be doing themselves. 14. Wallowing in personal difficulties. Some people let their personal difficulties interfere grossly with their work. During the course of life, one can expect some real joys and some real sorrows. Maintaining a proper perspective is often difficult. 15. Distractibility and lack of concentration. Even some very intelligent people have very short attention spans. 16. Spreading oneself too think or too thick. Undertaking too many activities may result in none being completed on time. Undertaking too few can also result in missed opportunities and reduced levels of accomplishment. 17. Inability to delay gratification. Some people reward themselves and are rewarded by others for finishing small tasks, while avoiding bigger tasks that would earn them larger rewards. 18. Inability to see the forest for the trees. Some people become obsessed with details and are either unwilling or unable to see or deal with the larger picture in the projects they undertake. 19. Lack of balance between critical, analytical thinking and creative, synthetic thinking. It is important for people to learn what kind of thinking is expected of them in each situation. 20. Too little or too much self-confidence. Lack of self-confidence can gnaw away at a person’s ability to get things done and become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Conversely, individuals with too much self-confidence may not know when to admit they are wrong or in need of self-improvement.
http://www.acceleratingfuture.com/michael/works/intelligentfailure.htm

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front … if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant Donnés, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

402 Do It Yourself eBooks | Carsonified
In this article, I'll introduce you to the exciting world of eBooks, specifically the ePub format in regards to Apple's new iBookstore, but much of the same business
http://carsonified.com/blog/business/do-it-yourself-ebooks/

375 30 Minimalist Web Designs for Your Inspiration - Web Design Blog – DesignM.ag
Designers love to see variety in styles from one website to the next. Although large images, extravagant backgrounds, video, and other elements have become much more common as the average user's connection speed has increased, many designers are still doing an excellent job of keeping things simple. In this post we'll feature 30 websites that use a minimalist style of design. Skylar Anderson
http://designm.ag/inspiration/30-minimalist-web-designs-for-your-inspiration/

369 How to Install Mac OS X on a PC (Without Using a Mac)
There are many great tutorials on the web for using a Mac to install Mac OS X Snow Leopard on a PC. Unfortunately, you may be unable to follow such tutorials if you do not readily have access to a Mac to perform the preparation necessary for the installation. Great progress has been made in hacking PCs to run OS X, and it is now possible to install Mac OS X without a Mac. Thanks to some great tools put together by some brilliant hackers, it is also much easier and does not involve nearly as much time and effort as was once required.
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-install-mac-os-x-on-a-pc-without-using-a-mac/

340 7-things-to-stop-doing-now-on-facebook: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
Using a Weak Password Avoid simple names or words you can find in a dictionary, even with numbers tacked on the end. Instead, mix upper- and lower-case letters, numbers, and symbols. A password should have at least eight characters. One good technique is to insert numbers or symbols in the middle of a word, such as this variant on the word "houses": hO27usEs! Leaving Your Full Birth Date in Your Profile More from ConsumerReports.org: • Millions of Users Exposing Personal Information • Tested: 119 Laptops, Desktops, Netbooks and iPad • Electronics Reviews It's an ideal target for identity thieves, who could use it to obtain more information about you and potentially gain access to your bank or credit card account. If you've already entered a birth date, go to your profile page and click on the Info tab, then on Edit Information. Under the Basic Information section, choose to show only the month and day or no birthday at all. Overlooking Useful Privacy Controls For almost everything in your Facebook profile, you can limit access to only your friends, friends of friends, or yourself. Restrict access to photos, birth date, religious views, and family information, among other things. You can give only certain people or groups access to items such as photos, or block particular people from seeing them. Consider leaving out contact info, such as phone number and address, since you probably don't want anyone to have access to that information anyway. Popular Stories on Yahoo!: • 20 Best Cities to Ride Out the Recession • Wealth Ranking: You're Richer Than You Think • 7 Expenses You Can Ditch in Retirement More from Yahoo! Finance Posting Your Child's Name in a Caption Don't use a child's name in photo tags or captions. If someone else does, delete it by clicking on Remove Tag. If your child isn't on Facebook and someone includes his or her name in a caption, ask that person to remove the name. Mentioning That You'll Be Away From Home That's like putting a "no one's home" sign on your door. Wait until you get home to tell everyone how awesome your vacation was and be vague about the date of any trip. Letting Search Engines Find You To help prevent strangers from accessing your page, go to the Search section of Facebook's privacy controls and select Only Friends for Facebook search results. Be sure the box for public search results isn't checked. Permitting Youngsters to Use Facebook Unsupervised Facebook limits its members to ages 13 and over, but children younger than that do use it. If you have a young child or teenager on Facebook, the best way to provide oversight is to become one of their online friends. Use your e-mail address as the contact for their account so that you receive their notifications and monitor their activities. "What they think is nothing can actually be pretty serious," says Charles Pavelites, a supervisory special agent at the Internet Crime Complaint Center. For example, a child who posts the comment "Mom will be home soon, I need to do the dishes" every day at the same time is revealing too much about the parents' regular comings and goings.
http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home/article/109538/7-things-to-stop-doing-now-on-facebook

303 View topic - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D
Instruments - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:14 pm Post subject: Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D I've found this site: http://homepage.mac.com/s...ds_cs15mod.html I've made mod in my CS30 - faster LFO speed... anyway? I know circuit in cs30 is diffrent. anyway i was wonderin howto get 24db lopass? JarreYuri - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:05 pm I don't know... yet. But I just wanted to say that I would soooo much want to have that synth You have. Congratulations! Which version do You have? radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:22 pm I had 3 versions: - Yamaha CS30L - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 6 or 8 steps - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 1 to 8 steps sold first two
http://216.70.103.199/forum/printview.php?t=4294&start=0&sid=120d9a0ab733b5531ff4e0e0473aca14

263 Facebook's Eroding Privacy Policy: A Timeline | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Since its incorporation just over five years ago, Facebook has undergone a remarkable transformation. When it started, it was a private space for communication with a group of your choice. Soon, it transformed into a platform where much of your infor...
http://w2.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/facebook-timeline/

253 Twitter : 10 outils indispensables pour trouver de l'information | ilonet
Note : Cet article est une traduction de l’article « 10 excelentes formas de buscar información en Twitter », écrit par Juan Diego Polo. Je le remercie pour m’avoir autorisé à le traduire. ¡Muchas gracias Juan! Si vous pensez que Twitter est un océan d’informations inutiles dans lequel des millions de personnes hurlent sans intérêt, c’est que vous avez mal cherché. En plus du moteur de recherche officiel search.twitter.com, il existe des centaines d’autres moyens pour trouver les perles du web, des informations importantes, ou des personnes intéressantes. Voire de capter le buzz avant même qu’il prenne de l’ampleur. Je vous présente ici 10 de ces outils, certains ayant directement été repris depuis dumblittleman.com. Si les moteurs de recherche vous passionnent, il y en a des dizaines dans le livre que j’ai publié l’année dernière (la version PDF est gratuite).
http://ilonet.fr/10-excellents-services-pour-trouver-de-l’information-sur-twitter.html

240 SoundClick - Free MP3 music download and much, much more.
SoundClick - the best free artist music community. Exclusive top stars and unsigned bands. Free member pages including unlimited free webspace, free MP3 download and hosting, streaming audio, personalized news, charts, tour calendar, auctions, ecommerce, music greeting cards, and tons more. Join Now!! Free MP3, MP3, Music, Bands, Unsigned, Record Deal, Download, Download MP3, Indie, Hip Hop, Beats, Beatz, Instrumentals, Lyrics, Social Network, mySpace
http://www.soundclick.com/default.cfm

228 Solargraphs - How to create 6 month exposures.
Please have a look at Tarja Trygg's www.solargraphy.com for more examples. Much of pinhole photography relates to the use of time and being creative with the light from the sun, similar wonders to that found in astronomy. A 6-month exposure will enable you to image the arc of the sun as it rises or sinks throughout 6 months of the year. As well as this you will get some foreground detail and a camera to look at with awe as a small hole etches its 6-month exposure from your window ledge, garden shed, lamp post, tree etc. Being able to capture a period of time far beyond our own vision is incredible enough, but even more amazing is how simple it is to do. The final camera gives an extreme wide angle of view of 160 degrees.
http://www.pinholephotography.org/Solargraph%20instructions.htm

211 30 Old PC Ads That Will Blow Your Processor | Information Technology Schools
Many people today either are too young to have ever seen some early pc’s or have forgotten what they looked like and how much they cost. Today we complain about the cost of a laptop running 2Ghz with 4GB ram for a cost of $ 400.00, however it wasn’t that long ago that laptops and pc’s were priced quite a bit higher. Here are 30 Old PC ads that will make you laugh and possibly appreciate what you have today.
http://www.informationtechnologyschools.org/blog/2010/30-old-pc-ads-that-will-blow-your-processor/

202 How Accessible is Your Website? 8 Tools to Analyze Your Website’s Level of Accessibility | Spyre Studios
Designing a website that's as much successful as it is effective takes time, skills, and a lot of testing. Normally, when we're talking about web design and we hear the word testing, the first thing that comes to mind is usability, and that's fine, but when was the last time you sat down to analyze the level of accessibility of your website? Testing on other aspects of your website are important, however, a lot of us seem to neglect our websites accessibility. This can ultimately lead to the loss of a wide range of users and poor elements of design. But not to fear, below we've compiled a set of tools that will help you combat poor accessibility. Every tool is free to use and has been chosen because it's easy to use and offers quality testing. accessibility,tools
http://spyrestudios.com/website-accessibility-tools/

201 5 Essential Apps for Your Business's Facebook Fan Page
There's so much you can do with your business Fan Page. Here are five useful apps that can bring extra social media value to your Facebook presence. Facebook, Fan Page,Business Lists,Facebook Lists,Lists,business,facebook,features,social media
http://mashable.com/2010/03/28/facebook-business-apps/

130 --- Alan Marcero · Web Developer · Music Producer ---
Alesis A6 Andromeda Trance Patches v1.0 If you are lucky enough to own one of these instruments, today is certainly a lucky one. A first of its kind release for this megalo-hemath analog dream machine. 128 trance-oriented patches ready to take your Andromeda where few dare to bring. Who say's there such thing as too much adrenaline?
http://www.alanmarcero.com/

69 Search for Music Using Your Voice by Singing or Humming, View Music Videos, Join Fan Clubs, Share with Friends, Be Discovered and Much More For Free! - midomi.com
midomi.com find and discover music and people. Use your voice to instantly connect to your favorite music, and to a community of people that share your musical interests. Sing your own versions, listen to voices, see pictures, rate singers, send messages, buy music Music search, lyrics, community, singing search, voice recognition, name that tune, karaoke online, query by humming, sound recognition, speech recognition, sing, midomi, melodis
http://www.midomi.com/

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