100SILEX, de 0 ŕ 100 s: past
1469 RADIO KNOBS (knobs.htm)
radio knobs, old vintage radios, antique radios, Play Things Of Past
http://www.oldradioparts.com/knobs.htm

1430 A Creepy Medical Tour Of The Past - Gallery

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/pictures/view/83858344/

1408 » Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Animodule.com
Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Here’s a quick photodoc of how I made a reusable SMT stencil from some aluminum siding I had laying around. It’s very simple to assemble and works great. Dirt cheap too. I had picked up a roll of aluminum flashing a few years ago to flash some chimneys I rebuilt/repointed and was curious to see how it would hold up as an SMT stencil. To buy an SMT stencil frame is near $1000 so I didn’t have much to lose if it didn’t work out. I cut the frame out of some birch plywood since I had some handy. Really any sturdy frame would do the trick. You could easily glue one together out of some 1x or trim board. I put a thicker sheet of aluminum down underneath the flashing to give the CNC endmill something sturdy to cut against and clamped it down stretched and tight. My thought there was that If I cut straight on the MDF it might push on the flashing and bend it before it cut through. A 1mm endmill did the trick. Each pass was .05mm deep. I pulled the Flashing tight and stapled it to the frame. No rocket science here. I taped up the inside edges so no solderpaste could squeeze between the frame and the stencil. I had some old screen print hinge boards so I just attached this frame the same way I would a screen print stencil. The only fiddly part was aligning the first PCB. You have to push around a little and lift the stencil and fiddle with it a little bit. Once I get all the pads lined up correctly I hold it in place and trace around it with a thin tip sharpie marker. Then you place the PCB in the outline. If you have the height adjusted correctly the stencil is sturdy enough to hold the PCB in place while you print the Solderpaste on it. just hold the stencil frame down and it pushes down on the PCB. I used a flexible putty knife as a squeegee. It worked fine. Cleanup was a breeze. Just scrape it off, unscrew the stencil frame from the hingeboard and stick it in the corner till you are ready to do another run.
http://www.animodule.com/diy-2/cut-simple-smt-stencil-from-common-aluminum-flashing-on-your-cnc/

1326 Forget Your Past - Timothy Allen in Buzludzha, Bulgaria
A winter photographic exploration of the astonishing derelict Buzludzha Monument in Bulgaria. (Buzludja , ????? ??????? ???????? )
http://humanplanet.com/timothyallen/2012/02/buzludzha-buzludja-bulgaria/

1045 synths of the past - Estradin - 230

http://synthsofthepast.times.lv/synths/230.html

1020 GnomeActivityJournal - GNOME Live!
GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Contents GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Overview Code Getting in touch Use cases Grouping and Filtering Features TODO GUI Sprints Architecture Long term goals Video Mockups And Current Usage Sub Pages See Zeitgeist for information about the Zeitgeist engine used internally by the GNOME Activity Journal. Overview The GNOME Activity Journal is a tool for easily browsing and finding files on your computer. It uses Zeitgeist to get information and metadata on what files/websites/contacts/etc. you worked with. Links: Zeitgeist Website, Zeitgeist on Launchpad, GNOME Activity Journal on Launchpad Code The Zeitgeist code is split into two modules: GNOME Activity Journal (GTK+ interface) Project page: https://launchpad.net/gnome-activity-journal Repository: bzr branch lp:gnome-activity-journal Zeitgeist Engine Project page: https://launchpad.net/zeitgeist Repository: bzr branch lp:zeitgeist Getting in touch Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~gnome-zeitgeist-users IRC: #zeitgeist @ irc.freenode.net, #gnome-zeitgeist @ irc.gimp.org Use cases John turns on his computer to work on his seminar paper. Instead of digging through his hierarchal file system, he simply opens up GNOME Activity Journal and clicks on the top item in the "Recently Used Files" list. When he realizes that he can't remember the name of the website that he was reading for research yesterday, he simply looks at the list of files related to his paper and clicks on the website. More at the Zeitgeist Vision page. Grouping and Filtering Our goal is to group/filter the data by: Type of data Source Time Name Tags Neighbouring Data Comments Location of use (GPS) Features Browse activities Drag and Drop (not for links) Tagging Auto tagging Searching Filtering by Dataproviders/Time/Tags Bookmark Data TODO GUI Sprints Add an actions toolbar to quickly share items by email or instant messaging. (See nautilus-share) Architecture Experiment with Tracker, Soylent, and Empathy. Long term goals Better metadata extraction (see some of the sprints above) Integration with other computers and mobile devices. Video Zeitgeist video GAJ video Mockups And Current Usage Some work was done by the City of Largo in the past which replicated some of the features of the Activity Journal. Possibly some of this work can result in ideas for improving the User Interface. Mockups And Usage. Sub Pages /BolzanoIdeas /CityOfLargo /Ideas
http://live.gnome.org/action/show/GnomeActivityJournal?action=show&redirect=GnomeZeitgeist

948 Pixel Perfection When Rotating, Pasting And Nudging In Photoshop - Smashing Magazine
When creating Web and app interfaces, most designers slave over every single pixel, making sure it’s got exactly the right color, texture and position. If you’re... web design, magazine, html, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2011/04/14/mastering-photoshop-pixel-perfection-when-rotating-pasting-and-nudging/

777 SPERRZONE: [ K E Y C H A I N S ]: Zazzle.com Store
About Beat Hauser, SPERRZONE Beat Hauser is interested in industrial archaeology and history of Europe. His special area is the brewing industry of Switzerland and the former German Democratic Republic. Since 2003 he is taking pictures of industrial areas and abandoned places within all Europe. On his web site SPERRZONE (www.sperrzone.net) he does not only present his own pictures, but also some information about the related factories and places as well as historical photo post cards, old letter heads, labels, advertisings to document the history of the factories. Most pictures are taken in abandoned factories. Abandoned places and industrial ruins are generally seen as “spots of dirt” and people feel uncomfortable around them. Often such places have a very long and interesting history, which seems almost forgotten today. Instead of the activity of former days there is nothing but silence and emptiness. Instead of windows, black holes are staring out of the walls. But very often the architecture of elapsed eras is attractive and astonishing. In combination with the emptiness and beginning decay, such places often spread the impression of a dream world. Decay and nature give new structures to strictly geometric forms and lines, e.g. in production halls. Moisture, moss and rust give new colors to gray halls. Beat Hauser tries to capture these impressions with his photographs. Aesthetics of decay is illustrated in its huge variety from huge industrial plants to small details. Past exhibitions 10 Jun – 1 Jul 2007 3Fotografen3, Alte evangelische Kirche Kirchzarten (Exhibition of the 3 winners of the „KirchzARTener FOTOsalons 2006“) 2 Dec – 3 Dec 2006 KirchzARTener FOTOsalon 2006, Kurhaus Kirchzarten (Photo contest with 54 participants, 1. rank) 20 Nov – 21 Nov 2004 KirchzARTener FOTOsalon 2004, Kurhaus Kirchzarten (Photo contest with 46 participants, 11. rank) Several beamer shows at party events of „Rigor Mortis“ and „Solanaceae“ in Basle, Aarau, Pratteln and Reinach (all Switzerland) sperrzone, industry, industrial, archaeology, industrie, industriekultur, zerfall, decay, architektur, architecture
http://www.zazzle.com/sperrzone/gifts?cg=196119980926265824

608 Stories In Flight | HTML5/CSS3 Cheatsheet
Here are some simple cut-and-paste examples of HTML5/CSS3 features that are currently (mid-2010) usable across a number of web browsers, chief among them Firefox, Safari, Chrome and Opera. For many of the CSS3 examples, Internet Explorer is the lone holdout with a limited number of workarounds, however these features degrade gracefully and may still be useful on new projects as long as this limitation is kept in mind. Both for SVG and Canvas there exist solid workarounds in the form of JavaScript libraries that allow even Internet Explorer to display these new objects, and in the case of SVGweb it may be a good idea to use this workaround for all browsers to limit the variability of the SVG rendering across platforms. Please note: With the exception of SVGWeb, no Internet Explorer workarounds have been included on this page - most of the examples will therefore not work in IE6, IE7 or IE8. And if you want to discuss any of the code below or leave a correction or suggestion, you can leave comments below and here is also The Web We Should Have on my blog. Thanks! On this page: HTML5 DOCTYPE Rounded Corners Rounded Corners Redux: Circles Box Shadows Text Shadows Border Images Transform Rotate Column Layout SVG Canvas Canvas Text Canvas Text Rotate Some more complex subjects are also discussed in these separate pages: CSS3 Transforms Ruby Annotations Multiple Background Images HTML5 Audio and JavaScript Control HTML5 Audio Data API - Spectrum Visualizer JavaScript: Binary Loader Google Font API and Font Loading Behavior JavaScript: Sorting DIVs JavaScript: HTML5 Video with SRT Subtitles ...and don't forget to leave some comments below!
http://www.storiesinflight.com/html5/

596 Eventide
Accessories Eventide PitchFactor Support Links ›Documentation ›Software Updates ›PitchFactor Support ›Knowledge Base ›Forum Find a Dealer No Comparison Nothing Sounds Like an Eventide Through the decades, top players have depended on Eventide: Jimmy Page, Frank Zappa, Brian May, Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai, Robert Fripp, John Petrucci, and Adrian Belew, to name a few. Now, for the first time these effects are portable AND affordable. Stompbox simple, PitchFactor fits on your pedalboard or in your gigbag. Features Specifications Photos Media Studio Quality Effects at Your Feet Top recording studios worldwide use Eventide effects on hit after hit. PitchFactor includes Eventide's best pitch-changing effects from the past 39 years without compromising quality OR flexibility. Flexibility Built-In Plug-and-play expression pedal control of wet/dry mix or any combination of parameters. Control program changes and vary parameters continuously via MIDI. Supports instrument or line level inputs and outputs. Plays well with others; adapts seamlessly with a wide variety of amps and other foot pedals. Obsolescence is so 20th Century Easy to upgrade; download new software from the Internet and install via USB. Features 10 of Eventide’s signature stereo or mono pitch+delay effects: Diatonic PitchFlex™ Quadravox™ Octaver™ HarModulator™ Crystals™ MicroPitch HarPeggiator™ H910 / H949 Synthonizer™ Up to 4 voices of diatonic pitch shifting and up to 1.5 seconds of stereo delay Studio quality sound Guitar or bass compatible Built-in Tuner Software upgradeable via USB 2.0 MIDI control via USB or MIDI in, out/thru Instant program change Real-time control with 10 knobs, MIDI, or expression pedal Tap tempo and MIDI clock sync 100 factory presets, unlimited through MIDI True analog bypass Rugged cast metal construction Reliable metal footswitches for instant preset access Mono or stereo operation Guitar or line level inputs and outputs
http://www.eventide.com/AudioDivision/Products/StompBoxes/PitchFactor.aspx

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

468 The Complete Web Design Style Series (700 Designs in 14 Categories) - Speckyboy Design Magazine
Over the past year or so we have periodically published web design collections and inspirational showcases from the most popular and important design 2009,2010,404,agency,app,application,apps,art,best,black,blog,clean,collection,color,company,corporate,design,design style,designer,developer,ecommerce,effect,form,free,freelance,graphic design,gui,headline,illustration,inspiration,large background,layout,logo,magazine,minimal,nav,navigation,photo,photography,proposal,retro,showcase,text,typography,vector,vintage,web app,web design,web designer,wp,css,design style series,illustrator,web apps
http://speckyboy.com/2010/06/27/the-complete-web-design-style-series-700-designs-in-14-categories/

367 60 Minimal and Super Clean Web Designs to Inspire You | Inspiration
A clean and minimal web design is an effective way to convey an image of elegance and sophistication. This type of design is all about doing more with less, and making use of plenty of white space to let content and page elements breathe. However, it can be difficult to come up with a solid minimal website, because you can’t rely on “shiny” design elements to make things visually appealing. So if you’ve struggled in the past to tackle this type of web design, we’re here to help. Here’s a showcase of 60 minimal and super clean web designs to inspire you.
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/60-minimal-and-super-clean-web-designs-to-inspire-you

298 The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook
Facebook is a great service. I have a profile, and so does nearly everyone I know under the age of 60. However, Facebook hasn't always managed its users' data well. In the beginning, it restricted the visibility of a user's personal information to just their friends and their "network" (college or school). Over the past couple of years, the default privacy settings for a Facebook user's personal information have become more and more permissive. They've also changed how your personal information is classified several times, sometimes in a manner that has been confusing for their users. This has largely been part of Facebook's effort to correlate, publish, and monetize their social graph: a massive database of entities and links that covers everything from where you live to the movies you like and the people you trust. This blog post by Kurt Opsahl at the the EFF gives a brief timeline of Facebook's Terms of Service changes through April of 2010. It's a great overview, but I was a little disappointed it wasn't an actual timeline: hence my initial inspiration for this infographic.
http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/

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