100SILEX, de 0 ŕ 100 s: raise
1522 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader
secure tt-rss, tt-rss security 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader July 27, 2015 by Anand Leave a Comment secure-tt-rss-ft Share: share htpcBeginner We recently presented Tiny Tiny RSS to you as a great alternative to Google reader, which is one more way you can extend the functionality of your home server or your hosting space. Hopefully, you already exported your data from Google Reader. In this post, we will show you how to secure TT-RSS reader to prevent unauthorized access. Tiny Tiny RSS is an open source web-based news feed (RSS/Atom) reader and aggregator, designed to allow you to read news from any location, while feeling as close to a real desktop application as possible. As we previously explained, it makes an ideal candidate to replace Google Reader. While there are services like Feedly and Newsblur grabbing the crowd Google Reader, which some of you may prefer, there are a group of people who would like to run a RSS reader on their own server and keep things private. Assuming that you have already installed Tiny Tiny RSS on your alternative to Google reader or hosting space, we will now show you how to secure TT-RSS reader. Secure TT-RSS Reader One of the main reasons to move to an RSS aggregator like TT-RSS is maintaining your privacy. So if you do not secure TT-RSS reader well you are not only making your data available public but also making your system vulnerable to potential attacks. Choosing a strong username and password while setting your TT-RSS is the first basic thing that you can do to secure TT-RSS reader. Listed below are few more ways you can increase TT-RSS reader’s security. 1. Rename TT-RSS Folder One of the first lines of defense is to not use tt-rss in your URL to access your TT-RSS reader. To do this on your hosting account, use a folder name other than tt-rss while installing TT-RSS. On your Linux home server, edit /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf and change the first /tt-rss to something else. An example is shown below. TT-RSS Rename URL TT-RSS Rename URL After making the change, restart your TT-RSS and Apache to apply the changes: sudo service tt-rss restart sudo serivce apache2 reload Your TT-RSS reader is now available through the new URL (example: http://mydomain.com/myreader) only. Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 2. Enable SSL Accessing TT-RSS through http sends all information as unencrypted data. This could mean less privacy due to potential sniffing. The solution is to encrypt the data during transfer, which makes sniffing by hackers harder. To enable and enforce HTTPS access on Linux servers with Apache, install the following run-time libraries: sudo apt-get install libssl0.9.8 libpam0g openssl Restart your Apache server as shown above. You should now be able to access your TT-RSS reader with HTTPS. Note that you may have to have a SSL certificate generated. Refer to Apache documentation if you want to generate your own certificate. By default, the system will install self-signed certificates for you. These certificates are likely to raise warnings when you point your browser to the site. 3. Disable Single User Mode By default the single user mode is already disabled (in /etc/tt-rss/config.php). Enabling single user mode will also disable TT-RSS login system. Therefore, keep the single user mode disabled. Disable Single User Mode Disable Single User Mode A better way to make it a single user system is by limiting the number of registrations to 1 as described below. For whatever reason, you still want to enable single user mode, make sure you implement Apache Authentication method described below. 4. Self Registrations Self registrations allow a visitor to register themselves, which could reduce TT-RSS security. If your TT-RSS will be for personal use only, then you may want to disable user registration by setting “ENABLE_REGISTRATION” to “false”. TT-RSS Self Registrations TT-RSS Self Registrations To further secure TT-RSS Reader, uou may also want to change “REG_MAX_USERS” to “1” to make your account the only account on TT-RSS. asus n66uASUS RT-N66U Dual-Band Wireless-N900 Gigabit Router asus n66u reviewsFind out why it is rated the best wireless router in its class. 5. Apache Authentication Last but not the least, enable Authentication. This is even more important if you have enabled “Single User Mode” describe above. Every time you access TT-RSS, you will be asked for a username and password as shown in the picture below: Secure TT-RSS Reader On your hosting account this equivalent to password protecting a directory, in this case the TT-RSS directory. To do this on your Ubuntu server, you will have to create a .htpasswd file. More information is available in Apache documentation. But the easiest way to achieve this is to use one of the htpasswd generators available online. After you enter the username and password two code blocks will be generated. Copy the contents of the .htpasswd code block and save it to /etc/apache2/.htpasswd_ttrss. Next, copy the contents of the .htaccess code block and add it to /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf as shown below: TT-RSS Apache Authentication TT-RSS Apache Authentication Save and exit. Restart both TT-RSS and Apache previous shown above. You should be prompted for a password every time you try to access TT-RSS. Some may think that this double authentication method is an extra inconvenience. But I would rather be safe than sorry. Go ahead, secure Tiny Tiny RSS Reader and enjoy reading articles on your private secure RSS Reader.
http://www.htpcbeginner.com/secure-tt-rss-reader/

962 25 Abandoned Soviet Monuments that look like they're from the Future | Crack Two
These structures were commissioned by former Yugoslavian president Josip Broz Tito in the 1960s and 70s to commemorate sites where WWII battles took place (like Tjentište, Kozara and Kadinjača), or where concentration camps stood (like Jasenovac and Niš). They were designed by different sculptors (Dušan Džamonja, Vojin Bakić, Miodrag Živković, Jordan and Iskra Grabul, to name a few) and architects (Bogdan Bogdanović, Gradimir Medaković...), conveying powerful visual impact to show the confidence and strength of the Socialist Republic. In the 1980s, these monuments attracted millions of visitors per year, especially young pioneers for their "patriotic education." After the Republic dissolved in early 1990s, they were completely abandoned, and their symbolic meanings were forever lost. From 2006 to 2009, Kempenaers toured around the ex-Yugoslavia region (now Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, etc.) with the help of a 1975 map of memorials, bringing before our eyes a series of melancholy yet striking images. His photos raise a question: can these former monuments continue to exist as pure sculptures? On one hand, their physical dilapidated condition and institutional neglect reflect a more general social historical fracturing. And on the other hand, they are still of stunning beauty without any symbolic significances. I know this may sound schizophrenic if you also read my last post. But maybe there are forms that can transcend meaning...
http://www.cracktwo.com/2011/04/25-abandoned-soviet-monuments-that-look.html

418 RAISERROR (Transact-SQL)
Generates an error message and initiates error processing for the session. RAISERROR can either reference a user-defined message stored in the sys.messages catalog view or build a message dynamically. The message is returned as a server error message to the calling application or to an associated CATCH block of a TRY…CATCH construct.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178592(v=SQL.100).aspx

325 Electronic_a # 11: Jeudi 29 avril 2010
Ben Edwards est un humble artisan amoureux de l’analogique, archéologue des temps pré-électroniques. "la musique synthétique", comme on l’appelait alors. Ben collectionne les synthétiseurs et en a accumulé une quantité invraisemblable. Si les noms suivants ne vous disent rien, Korg Modular, Oberheim SEM, Roland 100 M … souvenez-vous de Abbey Road ou de Blade Runner. C'est tout un pan de la musique pop qui fut irrigué des vibrations quasi cosmiques de ces machines et c’est une âme singulière et poétique que nous retrouverons ainsi ce soir. Ce que la presse en dit: « De son vrai nom Ben Edwards, Benge développe depuis ses premiers pas musicaux une passion peu commune pour les synthétiseurs, passion qui l’a conduit à amasser au fil du temps une collection de machines qui ferait baver d’envie bien des aficionados de la chose. Obsédé par cette famille d’instruments aux possibilités infinies et compositeur stakhanoviste si il en est, Benge passe sa vie à disséquer les algorithmes abscons de chacune de ses machines qu’il connaît jusqu’au plus profond de leur process électroniques » - A découvrir absolument « Album concept que ce Twenty Systems puisqu’il s’agit, en vingt pistes plutôt courtes, de présenter vingt synthétiseurs différents, un par année de 1968 à 1988. Dans un esprit didactique, le disque est accompagné d’un livret cartonné de 52 pages détaillant les caractéristiques de chaque synthétiseur tandis que les morceaux portent le nom de l’instrument ayant été utilisé pour chacun et l’année correspondante (utilisation unique et solitaire d’ailleurs, Ben Edwards indiquant n’avoir employé aucun autre effet ou appareil en dehors de ces synthétiseurs). » - Etherreal « Avec ce disque poétique, à la naïveté parfois désarmante (Yamaha CS30) mais toujours très inspiré, Benge nous fait voyager à travers les époques et rend un bel hommage à ces machines pleines de chaleur (qui sont pour certaines de véritables antiquités !) et à leurs géniaux créateurs. Rarement une leçon d'histoire aura été aussi délicieuse que celle-ci. » - Pop News « La musique de Ben Edwards est en effet bien plus et bien moins qu'un impossible catalogue de sons ou une ode technopositiviste : c'est un réenchantement viscéral du son électronique. » - Chronic’art « A brilliant contribution to the archaeology of electronic music » - Brian Eno « Indicates what a deliriously desirable thing the synthesis of sound has historically been » - The Wire « Absolutely cast iron irrefutable proof that synthesisers are better than guitars » - Vice Magazine
http://bellegarde.toulouse.fr/archives/154-electronica11

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