100SILEX, de 0 100 s: reader
1522 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader
secure tt-rss, tt-rss security 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader July 27, 2015 by Anand Leave a Comment secure-tt-rss-ft Share: share htpcBeginner We recently presented Tiny Tiny RSS to you as a great alternative to Google reader, which is one more way you can extend the functionality of your home server or your hosting space. Hopefully, you already exported your data from Google Reader. In this post, we will show you how to secure TT-RSS reader to prevent unauthorized access. Tiny Tiny RSS is an open source web-based news feed (RSS/Atom) reader and aggregator, designed to allow you to read news from any location, while feeling as close to a real desktop application as possible. As we previously explained, it makes an ideal candidate to replace Google Reader. While there are services like Feedly and Newsblur grabbing the crowd Google Reader, which some of you may prefer, there are a group of people who would like to run a RSS reader on their own server and keep things private. Assuming that you have already installed Tiny Tiny RSS on your alternative to Google reader or hosting space, we will now show you how to secure TT-RSS reader. Secure TT-RSS Reader One of the main reasons to move to an RSS aggregator like TT-RSS is maintaining your privacy. So if you do not secure TT-RSS reader well you are not only making your data available public but also making your system vulnerable to potential attacks. Choosing a strong username and password while setting your TT-RSS is the first basic thing that you can do to secure TT-RSS reader. Listed below are few more ways you can increase TT-RSS reader’s security. 1. Rename TT-RSS Folder One of the first lines of defense is to not use tt-rss in your URL to access your TT-RSS reader. To do this on your hosting account, use a folder name other than tt-rss while installing TT-RSS. On your Linux home server, edit /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf and change the first /tt-rss to something else. An example is shown below. TT-RSS Rename URL TT-RSS Rename URL After making the change, restart your TT-RSS and Apache to apply the changes: sudo service tt-rss restart sudo serivce apache2 reload Your TT-RSS reader is now available through the new URL (example: http://mydomain.com/myreader) only. Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 2. Enable SSL Accessing TT-RSS through http sends all information as unencrypted data. This could mean less privacy due to potential sniffing. The solution is to encrypt the data during transfer, which makes sniffing by hackers harder. To enable and enforce HTTPS access on Linux servers with Apache, install the following run-time libraries: sudo apt-get install libssl0.9.8 libpam0g openssl Restart your Apache server as shown above. You should now be able to access your TT-RSS reader with HTTPS. Note that you may have to have a SSL certificate generated. Refer to Apache documentation if you want to generate your own certificate. By default, the system will install self-signed certificates for you. These certificates are likely to raise warnings when you point your browser to the site. 3. Disable Single User Mode By default the single user mode is already disabled (in /etc/tt-rss/config.php). Enabling single user mode will also disable TT-RSS login system. Therefore, keep the single user mode disabled. Disable Single User Mode Disable Single User Mode A better way to make it a single user system is by limiting the number of registrations to 1 as described below. For whatever reason, you still want to enable single user mode, make sure you implement Apache Authentication method described below. 4. Self Registrations Self registrations allow a visitor to register themselves, which could reduce TT-RSS security. If your TT-RSS will be for personal use only, then you may want to disable user registration by setting “ENABLE_REGISTRATION” to “false”. TT-RSS Self Registrations TT-RSS Self Registrations To further secure TT-RSS Reader, uou may also want to change “REG_MAX_USERS” to “1” to make your account the only account on TT-RSS. asus n66uASUS RT-N66U Dual-Band Wireless-N900 Gigabit Router asus n66u reviewsFind out why it is rated the best wireless router in its class. 5. Apache Authentication Last but not the least, enable Authentication. This is even more important if you have enabled “Single User Mode” describe above. Every time you access TT-RSS, you will be asked for a username and password as shown in the picture below: Secure TT-RSS Reader On your hosting account this equivalent to password protecting a directory, in this case the TT-RSS directory. To do this on your Ubuntu server, you will have to create a .htpasswd file. More information is available in Apache documentation. But the easiest way to achieve this is to use one of the htpasswd generators available online. After you enter the username and password two code blocks will be generated. Copy the contents of the .htpasswd code block and save it to /etc/apache2/.htpasswd_ttrss. Next, copy the contents of the .htaccess code block and add it to /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf as shown below: TT-RSS Apache Authentication TT-RSS Apache Authentication Save and exit. Restart both TT-RSS and Apache previous shown above. You should be prompted for a password every time you try to access TT-RSS. Some may think that this double authentication method is an extra inconvenience. But I would rather be safe than sorry. Go ahead, secure Tiny Tiny RSS Reader and enjoy reading articles on your private secure RSS Reader.
http://www.htpcbeginner.com/secure-tt-rss-reader/

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

924 Mixing Audio: Concepts, Practices and Tools: Amazon.fr: Roey Izhaki: Livres en anglais
Mixing Audio: Concepts, Practices and Tools: Amazon.fr: Roey Izhaki: Livres en anglais Roey Izhaki,Mixing Audio: Concepts, Practices and Tools,Focal Press,0240520688,Acoustical engineering,Sound - Recording and reproducing,Sound - Recording and reproducing - Digital techniques,Music / Recording & Reproduction,Music,Music/Songbooks,Musik / Sonstiges,Music recording & reproduction,Music & Dance,Recording & Reproduction
http://www.amazon.fr/gp/reader/0240520688/ref=sib_dp_pt#reader-link

824 Set Up and Get to Know Your New Camera
Whether it takes photos or videos, and whether it fits in the palm of your hand or has interchangeable lenses, you've got a brand new camera to play with. Here's how to get the most out of your great new gift. Set Up and Get to Know Your New Camera, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/5717451/how-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-new-camera?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+lifehacker%2Ffull+%28Lifehacker%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

823 Avoid Added Stress by Just Deciding and Moving Forward
Because our brains have a way of creating a synthesized happiness when we don't get what we want, it's often hard for us to make a "wrong" decision. As a result, you're better off just deciding and moving forward. Avoid Added Stress by Just Deciding and Moving Forward, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/5719077/avoid-added-stress-by-just-deciding-and-moving-forward?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+lifehacker%2Ffull+%28Lifehacker%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

820 50 UNIX / Linux Sysadmin Tutorials
To wrap this year, I've collected 50 UNIX / Linux sysadmin related tutorials that we've posted so far.
http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/12/50-unix-linux-sysadmin-tutorials/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+TheGeekStuff+(The+Geek+Stuff)&utm_content=Google+Reader

755 Lotus Notes/Domino 7 application performance: Part 2: Optimizing database views
In part two of this article series, we explain how you can build views that are optimized for performance in your Notes/Domino applications. lotus notes, lotus domino, view performance, application performance, view indexing, reader names field, dddlsca
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/lotus/library/notes7-application-performance2/

752 How To: Copyright Signature Watermark On Lightroom 2 Using Mogrify Plugin
This tutorial is for those who are still using Lightroom 2. If you have Lightroom 3, please go to this tutorial I have been getting some question from my friends and reader on how to put a signature on your editing, lightroom, mogrify, plugin, Post Processing, signature
http://augusteo.com/2009/04/19/how-to-copyright-signature-watermark-on-lightroom-using-mogrify-plugin/

727 How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect | Apartment Therapy DC
How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect Mclain Wiesand, a Baltimore-based custom furniture company, has made a name for itself by producing handcrafted pieces that capture the feel of real antiques. One of the techniques they use for aging mirror is wonderfully simple and serves as the inspiration for this how to. Creating an antique mirror effect is an inexpensive way to revamp a flea market find, or add a new layer of interest and depth to an ordinary wall mirror. Almost any type of mirror can be aged using this technique, including mirrored plexiglass. Supplies • Mirrored glass or plexiglass. Due to the type of paint applied to the reflective coating, inexpensive, craft-store mirror works wonderfully. • Latex or other gloves for hand protection. • Paint stripper. Most types work fine. For a less toxic product, Citristrip works well. • Plastic putty spreader or putty knife. • Modern Masters Metal Effects Black Patina. This patina solution is essentially an acid that eats at the reflective surface of the mirror. There are probably other products that work similarly, but Modern Masters products work well and can be found online or in most art supply stores or specialty paint stores. • 1” chip brush (or similar brush). • Silver paint of choice. Steps Step 1: (Image 2, above) Wearing gloves, place mirror face down on cardboard or other protected surface in a well-ventilated area. Apply stripper generously to back of mirror and allow to sit for a few hours, or until paint can be easily removed with plastic scraper. It is not necessary for all of the paint to be removed; generally speaking, 80-90% should suffice. When paint has been stripped, wash mirror with soap and water and allow to dry. Step 2: (Images 3 & 4) Place stripped mirror face down on clean cardboard or other protected surface. Dip chip brush in Modern Masters Metal Patina Solution and gradually apply it to the raw reflective surface of the mirror. As mirror tends to age from the edges inward, it is best to apply patina solution in heavier amounts around the edges of the mirror. In a matter of minutes (or less), the patina solution will begin to eat away at the reflective surface. Other application techniques that produce nice effects are spattering and light directional brushing of patina solution. Continue applying solution until desired level of ageing is achieved. Rinse with water to neutralize the reaction and allow to dry. Step 3: (photos 5 & 6) This next step involves reapplying paint to the back of the mirror. The color paint you choose will be visible through the spots created by the patina solution. The dark areas of aged antique mirrors tend to be a dark silver-grey but depending on the silvering technique used, can range from gold to pale silver to black. One method that produced nice results is a combination of dark and light silver paints, applied randomly (per images). Apply paint until the reflective surface is completely covered.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/how-to/how-to-create-an-antique-mirror-effect-127227

658 The Gaia '10 Linux Desktop
Reader gabriela2400's desktop uses the Gaia customization set to completely revamp the Linux interface into a beautiful work of art, complete with wallpapers, icons, and a custom GTK theme. The Gaia '10 Linux Desktop, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/5651352/the-gaia-10-linux-desktop?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+lifehacker%2Ffull+%28Lifehacker%29

636 The Beginner’s Guide to Zen Habits – A Guided Tour | zen habits
‘Smile, breathe and go slowly.’ ~Thich Nhat Hanh Post written by Leo Babauta. Follow me on Twitter. Note: This is an update to the old guide — so it should be interesting to readers new and old. While some of you have been following Zen Habits since its early days (beginning of 2007), many of you are fairly new readers. To help you through the fairly overwhelming archives, I’ve compiled a beginner’s guide. Kind of a Quick Start guide. First, a note: Please don’t try to go through this all at once. There are days and days worth of reading here. I’ve just organized that so that you can go to the stuff you want to learn about first. Take it in small chunks. Where do you start when you have a thousand posts to read through? You start with the best, or at least the most popular. So here they are: Most Popular Posts breathe. be still. a brief guide to life. the best goal is no goal the lost art of solitude the elements of living lightly the zen of doing The Ultimate How to Get Lean Guide. simplify, and savor life How Not to Hurry Email Sanity: How to Clear Your Inbox When You’re Drowning the barefoot philosophy The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People How Not to Hurry The Simple, Ridiculously Useful Guide to Earning a Living from Your Passion 10 Benefits of Rising Early, and How to Do It 20 Things I Wish I Had Known When Starting Out in Life Simple Living Manifesto: 72 Ideas to Simplify Your Life A Guide to Creating a Minimalist Home Get Off Your Butt: 16 Ways to Get Motivated When You’re in a Slump
http://zenhabits.net/start/

481 50 Powerful Time-Savers For Web Designers - Smashing Magazine
Being a web designer is not easy. Not only do we need to have a good understanding about visual design, typography, information architecture, psychology and a plethora of other disciplines; in our work, we need to take care of so many details, so that our job becomes more and more time-consuming, requiring dozens of tools, attention span and an effective workflow for beautiful, timely and functional results. And this is where small time-savers become handy. Be it a handy checklist, batch installer, dummy image generator or converter from Excel spreadsheet to HTML — all these things can save us a couple of minutes every day, making our work easier and more efficient. And this is why we keep collecting them for Smashing Magazine’s readers. Whether you like lists or not: this one will probably help you find those little nuggets out there that will help you avoid headaches and stress. Below we present useful time-savers for web designers.
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/28/50-powerful-time-savers-for-web-designers/

447 Comparatif Amazon Kindle 2 contre Sony Reader PRS-600 Touch Edition
Page relative à : Comparatif Amazon Kindle 2 contre Sony Reader PRS-600 Touch Edition
http://www.lemondenumerique.com/page-19475-3-comparatif-amazon-kindle-2-contre-sony-reader-prs-600-touch-edition.html#page-19475-1-comparatif-amazon-kindle-2-contre-sony-reader-prs-600-touch-edition.html

435 Free Professional PSD Template: BlueMasters - Smashing Magazine
In this post we release a yet another freebie: BlueMasters, a free PSD template, designed by Wendell Fernandes and released for Smashing Magazine and its readers. As... web design, magazine, html, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/22/free-portfolio-psd-template-bluemasters/

364 What every programmer should know about memory, Part 1 [LWN.net]
Editor's introduction: Ulrich Drepper recently approached us asking if we would be interested in publishing a lengthy document he had written on how memory and software interact. We did not have to look at the text for long to realize that it would be of interest to many LWN readers. Memory usage is often the determining factor in how software performs, but good information on how to avoid memory bottlenecks is hard to find. This series of articles should change that situation. The original document prints out at over 100 pages. We will be splitting it into about seven segments, each run 1-2 weeks after its predecessor. Once the entire series is out, Ulrich will be releasing the full text. Reformatting the text from the original LaTeX has been a bit of a challenge, but the results, hopefully, will be good. For ease of online reading, Ulrich's footnotes have been placed {inline in the text}. Hyperlinked cross-references (and [bibliography references]) will not be possible until the full series is published. Many thanks to Ulrich for allowing LWN to publish this material; we hope that it will lead to more memory-efficient software across our systems in the near future.
https://lwn.net/Articles/250967/

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