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1163 Storing Passwords Securely
Why passwords, bcrypt, scrypt, PBKDF2, and Secure Remote Password
http://throwingfire.com/storing-passwords-securely/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+throwingfire+%28Throwing+Fire%29#notpasswordhashes

1132 Mammoth Modular Synthesizer At MIT Museum
Just got an update from Joe Paradiso on his homebuilt mammoth analog modular synthesizer. He’s installed it in the MIT Museum and has completed a fairly epic patch which you can listen to (24 hours a day!) here. Joe will be at the museum this Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm, demoing the synth to visitors, so be sure to stop by if you’re in the neighborhood. Here’s some info from Joe on the construction and inspiration for the latest patch. The second patch I made at the MIT Museum is totally done now, and you can hear it live on the stream. Listen to it at http://synth.media.mit.edu, and let me know what you think if you’re inclined – it’s running in physical space in Quad, of course – stereo on the stream. Note that this one has absolutely NO sequencer of any sort on it – all of the patterns you hear were made entirely from hand-patched logic (counters, ands, ors, flip flops, ring counters, rate multipliers, etc.). It’s an entirely different kind of composition environment from the norm – you really need to simultaneously be an engineer while being an artist and something of a performer. The inspiration for this patch started with the Boredoms – if you don’t know who they are, you should (http://www.boredoms.jp/). In particular, I was thinking of SuperRoots 9. The beauty of the patching interface is that you can never exactly nail what you start out to attain, but on the other hand, you get drawn into places you wouldn’t have normally gone once you start. The 3 drummers that Yamantaka Eye performs with lay down a compelling rhythm that my hand-patched logic and analog processing can’t match, of course. But this patch definitely has a strange jumpy groove once it gets into gear, and the 2-chord pad is archetypical too. Yes, Boredoms rule today! BTW, this patch took every cord I had, plus a good 30 more wires just shoved into the pin jacks – check out the photos here and here – the latter shows the kind of logic section patching complexity you need to build a sonic environment like this one. I’m ripping this baby out next Thursday, as I’ll be at the museum next Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm to demonstrate the synthesizer to visitors – doing some very simple patches and showing off what the modules do in case anybody is interested in this. It will run continuously until then. Otherwise, enjoy the stream – there are moments of introspective drift in-between wild percussion (yes, Boredoms!). I might pull the percussion line back so it doesn’t come so often or regularly, but it’s essentially a wrap.
http://synth.media.mit.edu/

992 Troy Hunt: Who’s who of bad password practices – banks, airlines and more
Troy Hunt on observations, musings and conjecture about the world of software and technology Troy Hunt, blog, .NET, Azure, Backup, Bing, Blogger, Career Development, Code Quality, Conference, Database, Design Utopia, DotNetNuke, Enterprise Software Platform, Internet Explorer, iPhone, K2, LinkedIn, Media, NDepend, Online Identity, OWASP, People Management, Personal Development, Product Review, ReSharper, Security, SharePoint, Silverlight, Software Quality, SQL Injection, SQL Server, Subversion, Travel, Twitter, Visual Studio, Windows Mobile, XSS, Ah, passwords. Love ‘em or hate ‘em, they’re a necessary evil of the digital age. The reality is we all end up with an alphabet soup of passwords spread over dozens of various sites and services across the internet. Whilst we might not always practice it, we all know the theory of creating a good password; uniqueness, randomness and length. The more of each, the better. Of course we frequently don’t do this because of all sorts of human factors such as convenience, memory or simple unawareness of the risks. Still, when it’s a case of individuals electing not to create secure passwords, they really only have themselves to blame. But what happens when the website won’t allow you to create a secure password? Or at least when they severely constrain your ability to create long, random, unique passwords? And what about when they don’t allow you to send it between your computer and their server securely? Even worse, what happens when our most “secure” institutions implement lazy password policies? Unfortunately, all of this is pretty rampant practice.
http://www.troyhunt.com/2011/01/whos-who-of-bad-password-practices.html

865 Evolver.html
Just Beautiful! What an amazing instrument! The DSI Evolver has the signature "old school" timbre down pat as well as being able to provide digital timbres reminiscent of the Waldorf Q. There's certainly a "rougher" side available as well with all the feedback implementation and controled distortion. Being able to make PM type plucked and blown sounds is just icing on the cake. Dave Smith should be commended for a job well done. Just have a look at the Panel Layout to get a taste of what this beauty can dish out - the controls are pretty much laid out in the form of a signal path graphic. Be sure to visit Dave Smith's Website! Evolver Sound Examples There are a lot of demos of the Evolver on the web showcasing the gutsy harsh sounds of this beast so I decided to post demos of some of my own patches as examples of the "softer" more "vintage" side of the Evolver's timbre. I make no apologies for these unpolished recordings - these are merely sound samples ;) Resonant Plucked Pad This pad shows some of the rich resonant nature of the filter. Soft Lead This is a simple analog brass lead patch. FM Pad A fun patch with lots of motion made using my "Audio-rate Filter FM" programming tip below. Warm Pad A nice bland-vanilla pad ^_^ What can I say? I love pads... For more MP3 demos showing the full gamut of sounds the Evolver and Polyevolver are capable of, please visit the excellent website of Stefan Trippler! The Definitive Guide to Evolver This rather in-depth guide to the Evolver goes places and does things a mere manual can't. This labor-of-love was crafted by Anu Kirk and with his kind permission, I am offering this fantastic resource right here in PDF format! A much smaller version (400K) is here but it dosen't have internal hyperlinks. Programming Tips Here's a fun repository of programming tips for the Evolver in all its incarnations. Please email me if you would like to add some. Fingered Wave Sequence Submitted by Dave Bryce. This brilliant technique has to be heard to be believed! Plus, its one of those cool things unique to the Evolver! This particular tip is so full of detailed information that it gets its own page! Audio-rate Filter FM Submitted by James Maier. Use the "Audio Mod" parameter in the Filter section to frequency-modulate the cutoff with the analog oscillator. Add resonance until the filter is just on the edge of oscillation then mod the cutoff with just a little triangle LFO set at a very slow speed. Amazing moving chorusing pad and lead sounds can be made this way. Fatter Bass/Pad Sounds Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the same sound in both channels (detuned saws, for instance). With the filters at the 24dB setting, increasing resonance cuts the passband as on the Moog filters. Set Envelope 3 to minimum attack, maximum decay and release, and sustain to maximum. This "creates" an offset, a continuous "on" signal while the keys are gated. Modulate one filters' resonance up (just one), or of the overall resonance level is high, us it to modulate one filters' resonance to its minimum. You get the resonant character plus the size of the non-resonant filter. Use Tri and Sine waves on that side too. "Warmer" Sounds Submitted by James Maier. The Evolver can make many ultra-bright and buzzy sounds due to its extensive feedback and distortion stages but sometimes people miss the subtler side of the beast. For a warmer sound use little or no distortion, close the filter just a bit and turn off the feedback and delay lines. I've managed to get dead-on Prophet5 timbres this way. Adding "Punch" Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the envelopes to linear, and use a Mod to modulate AmpEnv All by itself (lin through log responses with positive and negative self-modulation). This is of course fun on the filter envelopes as well. More Vintage Character Submitted by Mike Peake. Oscillator Slop, set at 5, doesn't come close to the Moog and other old-timer movement, so add slight (1 or 2) LFO to pitch modulations, with individual LFOs per oscillator, and a touch of LFO to LFO rate modulation. A tad of Envelope 3 to pitch helps as well. Don't miss out on the 12dB filter setting Submitted by Mike Peake. The 24dB setting has much more resonance, but the 12dB setting can sound nice and plucky, and do nice slightly fuzzy pads etc. DSI Evolver Waveshape Charts Below are charts I've assembled of the digital waveforms and their spectra as currently used in the DSI Evolver synthesizers. Originally these waves were unique to the SCI ProphetVS vector synth. I find these waveform/spectra graphics really usefull when programming sounds - maybe you will as well. Pay special attention to the spectra as this info is sometimes much more useful than waveshape in determining actual timbre - even before you hear what the waveform sounds like. These are designed to be downloaded (right-click & "save target as"), and printed at 300dpi on 8.5" x 11" pages - don't resize these images before printing or you will lose useful detail. Use them as a handy refrence. This information was cobbled together from various scattered sources (with very special thanks to Achim Gratz!). Any errors or omissions are my own. ^_^ HAVE FUN!!! Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 As far as the origin of these waves is concerned, one of the original VS engineers, Chris Meyer, said: "The original waves for the VS were created three ways - extracting single-cycles from sampled sounds, using a custom additive synthesis program, and using a program Josh (Josh Jeffe, another VS engineer) slapped together called "Hacker" where you could draw the waveshape. These were fed straight from the computer through the filter and VCA of a Pro-One to figure out what they might sound like in a patch. And by the way, no PPG waveforms appear inside the VS - we had access to them, but in the end our consciences got the better of us. We did steal some waveforms from the Korg DW6000, but only by looking at the harmonic drawings on the front panel and trying to imitate them in our additive synthesis program." Modulation Matrix "Cheat Sheet" This chart shows all the modulation routing available on the Evolver. This same info is available in the manual but this can be printed on a single sheet of paper as a handy refrence! Evolver Wallpaper These I created just for fun and desktop "beautification" ;) 1280 X 1024 1024 X 768 800 X 600
http://www.carbon111.com/evolver.html

781 Atlas obscura
About the Atlas Obscura Welcome to the Atlas Obscura, a compendium of this age's wonders, curiosities, and esoterica. The Atlas Obscura is a collaborative project with the goal of cataloging all of the singular, eccentric, bizarre, fantastical, and strange out-of-the-way places that get left out of traditional travel guidebooks and are ignored by the average tourist. If you're looking for miniature cities, glass flowers, books bound in human skin, gigantic flaming holes in the ground, phallological museums, bone churches, balancing pagodas, or homes built entirely out of paper, the Atlas Obscura is where you'll find them. The Atlas Obscura is not just about collecting oddities. In an age where everything seems to have been explored and there is nothing new to be found, the Atlas Obscura celebrates a different way of traveling, and a different lens through which to view the world. The Atlas Obscura depends on our community of far-flung explorers to find and report back about the world's wonders and curiosities. If you have been to, know of, or have heard about a place that belongs in the Atlas Obscura, we want you to tell us about it. Anyone and everyone is welcome and encouraged to nominate places for inclusion, and to edit content already in the Atlas. Thanks for stopping by, and good exploring!
http://atlasobscura.com/globe/europe/france?page=3

746 40 Essential CSS Templates, Resources and Downloads | Speckyboy Design Magazine
Every web developer should have in their toolbox a collection of CSS tools and resources like the ones outlined in this article. A set of techniques that you rely on and that are always at the ready to cover any possible eventuality. You will find not a selection of the latest innovative CSS techniques (there are some) in this article, merely a collection of tools, resources and downloads that can be used by web designers for solutions to everyday CSS design and coding solutions. The resources below have been split into four categories: CSS Download Packages (all of the CSS resources offer multiple variations of each technique), Downloadable CSS Tools (the resources within this category offers specialized templates), Web, Mobile & Form Frameworks (+ tools and templates to help you get started with each); Feature-Rich and Outstanding Mobile & Web Templates and finally, a selection of tools to help with cross browser compatibility. We don’t presume that this is an ultimate collection, merely a selection of resources we have found to be indispensable. We are positive we have missed a few, and would love to hear about the tools and resources you rely upon.
http://speckyboy.com/2010/11/08/40-essential-css-templates-resources-and-downloads/

551 The Top Idea in Your Mind
I realized recently that what one thinks about in the shower in the morning is more important than I'd thought. I knew it was a good time to have ideas. Now I'd go further: now I'd say it's hard to do a really good job on anything you don't think about in the shower. Everyone who's worked on difficult problems is probably familiar with the phenomenon of working hard to figure something out, failing, and then suddenly seeing the answer a bit later while doing something else. There's a kind of thinking you do without trying to. I'm increasingly convinced this type of thinking is not merely helpful in solving hard problems, but necessary. The tricky part is, you can only control it indirectly. [1] I think most people have one top idea in their mind at any given time. That's the idea their thoughts will drift toward when they're allowed to drift freely. And this idea will thus tend to get all the benefit of that type of thinking, while others are starved of it. Which means it's a disaster to let the wrong idea become the top one in your mind. What made this clear to me was having an idea I didn't want as the top one in my mind for two long stretches.
http://www.paulgraham.com/top.html

515 Flickr: Analogue Haven's Photostream
Flickr is almost certainly the best online photo management and sharing application in the world. Show off your favorite photos and videos to the world, securely and privately show content to your friends and family, or blog the photos and videos you take with a cameraphone. photography, digital photography, cameraphones, camera, hobby photography, photo, digital camera, compactflash, smartmedia, cameras, canon, nikon, olympus, fujifilm, video
http://www.flickr.com/photos/analoguehaven/

514 Flickr: Analogue Haven's Photostream
Flickr is almost certainly the best online photo management and sharing application in the world. Show off your favorite photos and videos to the world, securely and privately show content to your friends and family, or blog the photos and videos you take with a cameraphone. photography, digital photography, cameraphones, camera, hobby photography, photo, digital camera, compactflash, smartmedia, cameras, canon, nikon, olympus, fujifilm, video
http://www.flickr.com/photos/analoguehaven/page5/

492 Flickr: Chris_Carter_'s Photostream
Flickr is almost certainly the best online photo management and sharing application in the world. Show off your favorite photos and videos to the world, securely and privately show content to your friends and family, or blog the photos and videos you take with a cameraphone. photography, digital photography, cameraphones, camera, hobby photography, photo, digital camera, compactflash, smartmedia, cameras, canon, nikon, olympus, fujifilm, video
http://www.flickr.com/photos/chris_carter_/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

474 Why Intelligent People Fail
Why Intelligent People Fail Content from Sternberg, R. (1994). In search of the human mind. New York: Harcourt Brace. 1. Lack of motivation. A talent is irrelevant if a person is not motivated to use it. Motivation may be external (for example, social approval) or internal (satisfaction from a job well-done, for instance). External sources tend to be transient, while internal sources tend to produce more consistent performance. 2. Lack of impulse control. Habitual impulsiveness gets in the way of optimal performance. Some people do not bring their full intellectual resources to bear on a problem but go with the first solution that pops into their heads. 3. Lack of perserverance and perseveration. Some people give up too easily, while others are unable to stop even when the quest will clearly be fruitless. 4. Using the wrong abilities. People may not be using the right abilities for the tasks in which they are engaged. 5. Inability to translate thought into action. Some people seem buried in thought. They have good ideas but rarely seem able to do anything about them. 6. Lack of product orientation. Some people seem more concerned about the process than the result of activity. 7. Inability to complete tasks. For some people nothing ever draws to a close. Perhaps it’s fear of what they would do next or fear of becoming hopelessly enmeshed in detail. 8. Failure to initiate. Still others are unwilling or unable to initiate a project. It may be indecision or fear of commitment. 9. Fear of failure. People may not reach peak performance because they avoid the really important challenges in life. 10. Procrastination. Some people are unable to act without pressure. They may also look for little things to do in order to put off the big ones. 11. Misattribution of blame. Some people always blame themselves for even the slightest mishap. Some always blame others. 12. Excessive self-pity. Some people spend more time feeling sorry for themselves than expending the effort necessary to overcome the problem. 13. Excessive dependency. Some people expect others to do for them what they ought to be doing themselves. 14. Wallowing in personal difficulties. Some people let their personal difficulties interfere grossly with their work. During the course of life, one can expect some real joys and some real sorrows. Maintaining a proper perspective is often difficult. 15. Distractibility and lack of concentration. Even some very intelligent people have very short attention spans. 16. Spreading oneself too think or too thick. Undertaking too many activities may result in none being completed on time. Undertaking too few can also result in missed opportunities and reduced levels of accomplishment. 17. Inability to delay gratification. Some people reward themselves and are rewarded by others for finishing small tasks, while avoiding bigger tasks that would earn them larger rewards. 18. Inability to see the forest for the trees. Some people become obsessed with details and are either unwilling or unable to see or deal with the larger picture in the projects they undertake. 19. Lack of balance between critical, analytical thinking and creative, synthetic thinking. It is important for people to learn what kind of thinking is expected of them in each situation. 20. Too little or too much self-confidence. Lack of self-confidence can gnaw away at a person’s ability to get things done and become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Conversely, individuals with too much self-confidence may not know when to admit they are wrong or in need of self-improvement.
http://www.acceleratingfuture.com/michael/works/intelligentfailure.htm

367 60 Minimal and Super Clean Web Designs to Inspire You | Inspiration
A clean and minimal web design is an effective way to convey an image of elegance and sophistication. This type of design is all about doing more with less, and making use of plenty of white space to let content and page elements breathe. However, it can be difficult to come up with a solid minimal website, because you can’t rely on “shiny” design elements to make things visually appealing. So if you’ve struggled in the past to tackle this type of web design, we’re here to help. Here’s a showcase of 60 minimal and super clean web designs to inspire you.
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/60-minimal-and-super-clean-web-designs-to-inspire-you

327 ReclaimPrivacy.org | Facebook Privacy Scanner
Get Informed Keep up with the latest news about privacy policies on Facebook. The Erosion of Facebook Privacy eff.org Facebook Privacy Changes eff.org 7 Things to Stop Doing Now on Facebook yahoo.com Facebook's Gone Rogue wired.com Get Protected This website provides an independent and open tool for scanning your Facebook privacy settings. The source code and its development will always remain open and transparent. Drag this link to your web browser bookmarks bar: Scan for Privacy Go to your Facebook privacy settings and then click that bookmark once you are on Facebook. You will see a series of privacy scans that inspect your privacy settings and warn you about settings that might be unexpectedly public. Follow us on Facebook to hear about the latest updates. Having trouble? Check our help page for tips and video walkthroughs. Get Involved Our mission is to promote privacy awareness on Facebook and elsewhere. Spread awareness to your friends on Facebook by sharing this website with them: Share 128K You can follow us on Twitter too! If you prefer email, you can also sign up for the newsletter to get informed of privacy updates: email: Are you a coder? Contribute to the source code and help to keep the privacy scanner up-to-date. Read Our Own Privacy Policy Our privacy policy is not long: we never see your Facebook data we never share your personal information Simple. The scanner operates entirely within your own browser. Statement of limitation of liability: you use this tool at your own risk, and by using this tool you agree to hold neither ReclaimPrivacy.org (nor its contributors) liable for damage to your Facebook account. However, we do strive to reduce that risk by keeping the source code open and transparent, so that we can identify bugs and quickly fix any functionality. about the author I am an avid Javascript developer and co-founder at Olark (check it out!). You can chat with me about ReclaimPrivacy.org on my website.
http://www.reclaimprivacy.org/

214 Best User Interface Design Resources: The Round-up | Dzine Blog
If you strive to be a great designer (like most), then you’re more than likely to know that a web application or websites success many times rely solely on how well designed the User Interface may be. As you scale the web and even read books, there can be an influx of misleading information pertaining to the way you should design your UI. When in reality you should do what works best for you and your users. Below you will find a variety of excellent User Interface resources that will allow you to access, redefine, and create a well designed User Interface. You should use these resources first as inspiration, and second as somewhat of a guide as to what your users may need when they come face to face with your UI.
http://dzineblog.com/2010/03/best-user-interface-design-resources-the-round-up.html

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