100SILEX, de 0 100 s: simply
1347 Online-REPs-and-REPLs
Action Script 3: http://eval.hurlant.com/demo/ http://wonderfl.net/ Ada: http://ideone.com/ Arc: http://dabuttonfactory.com:8080/ http://jonathan.tang.name/files/arclite/ Assembler: http://ideone.com/ AWK: http://ideone.com/ Bash: http://ideone.com/ BASIC: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html bc: http://ideone.com/ BeanShell: http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ Bloop: http://repl.it/ brainfuck: http://ideone.com/ http://repl.it/ C: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ C#: http://ideone.com/ C++: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ Clojure: http://tryclj.licenser.net/ http://www.try-clojure.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ COBOL: http://ideone.com/ CoffeeScript: http://jashkenas.github.com/coffee-script/ (Click "TRY COFFEESCRIPT") http://repl.it/ Common Lisp: http://ideone.com/ http://biobike.org/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://www.solve-et-coagula.com/As3Lisp.html (subset) D: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ Emacs Lisp: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Emoticon: http://repl.it/ Erlang: http://ideone.com/ F#: http://tryfs.net/ Forth: http://ideone.com/ http://repl.it/ Fortran: http://ideone.com/ Go: http://ideone.com/ http://golang.org/doc/play/ Groovy: http://trygroovy.appspot.com/tutorial http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ Haskell: http://tryhaskell.org/ http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Icon: http://ideone.com/ Io: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Intercal: http://ideone.com/ Java: http://ideone.com/ JavaScript: http://www.squarefree.com/shell/shell.html http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ http://jsconsole.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://repl.it/ http://webshell.io Kaffeine: http://repl.it/ LOLCODE: http://repl.it/ Lua: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://repl.it/ MongoDB: http://try.mongodb.org/ Move: http://repl.it/ Nemerle: http://ideone.com/ Nice: http://ideone.com/ Objective-J: http://cappuccino.org/learn/console/ OCaml: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Oz: http://ideone.com/ Pascal: http://ideone.com/ Perl: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://sunaba.plackperl.org/ Perl6: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html PHP: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Pike: http://ideone.com/ PostScript: http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Prolog: http://ideone.com/ Python: http://shell.appspot.com/ http://www.datamech.com/devan/trypython/trypython.py http://www.trypython.org/ http://try-python.mired.org/ http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://ironpython.net/try/ http://www.skulpt.org/ http://doc.pyschools.com/console http://pythonwebconsole.thomnichols.org/ http://repl.it/ QBasic: http://repl.it/ R: http://ideone.com/ Ruby: http://tryruby.org/ http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ http://repl.it/ Scala: http://www.simplyscala.com/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ Scheme: http://sisc-scheme.org/sisc-online.php http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://lotrepls.appspot.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html http://repl.it/ Smalltalk: http://ideone.com/ Tcl: http://codepad.org/ http://ideone.com/ http://colabv6.dan.co.jp/lleval.html Unlambda: http://ideone.com/ http://repl.it/ Visual Basic .NET: http://ideone.com/ Whitespace: http://ideone.com/ See also: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/49092/online-interactive-consoles http://codepad.org/about http://ideone.com/faq http://repl.it/#:help
http://joel.franusic.com/Online-REPs-and-REPLs/

1306 Cern
Twenty years of a free, open web On 30 April 1993 CERN published a statement that made World Wide Web technology available on a royalty free basis, allowing the web to flourish On 30 April 1993 CERN published a statement that made World Wide Web ("W3", or simply "the web") technology available on a royalty-free basis. By making the software required to run a web server freely available, along with a basic browser and a library of code, the web was allowed to flourish.
http://info.cern.ch/

1020 GnomeActivityJournal - GNOME Live!
GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Contents GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Overview Code Getting in touch Use cases Grouping and Filtering Features TODO GUI Sprints Architecture Long term goals Video Mockups And Current Usage Sub Pages See Zeitgeist for information about the Zeitgeist engine used internally by the GNOME Activity Journal. Overview The GNOME Activity Journal is a tool for easily browsing and finding files on your computer. It uses Zeitgeist to get information and metadata on what files/websites/contacts/etc. you worked with. Links: Zeitgeist Website, Zeitgeist on Launchpad, GNOME Activity Journal on Launchpad Code The Zeitgeist code is split into two modules: GNOME Activity Journal (GTK+ interface) Project page: https://launchpad.net/gnome-activity-journal Repository: bzr branch lp:gnome-activity-journal Zeitgeist Engine Project page: https://launchpad.net/zeitgeist Repository: bzr branch lp:zeitgeist Getting in touch Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~gnome-zeitgeist-users IRC: #zeitgeist @ irc.freenode.net, #gnome-zeitgeist @ irc.gimp.org Use cases John turns on his computer to work on his seminar paper. Instead of digging through his hierarchal file system, he simply opens up GNOME Activity Journal and clicks on the top item in the "Recently Used Files" list. When he realizes that he can't remember the name of the website that he was reading for research yesterday, he simply looks at the list of files related to his paper and clicks on the website. More at the Zeitgeist Vision page. Grouping and Filtering Our goal is to group/filter the data by: Type of data Source Time Name Tags Neighbouring Data Comments Location of use (GPS) Features Browse activities Drag and Drop (not for links) Tagging Auto tagging Searching Filtering by Dataproviders/Time/Tags Bookmark Data TODO GUI Sprints Add an actions toolbar to quickly share items by email or instant messaging. (See nautilus-share) Architecture Experiment with Tracker, Soylent, and Empathy. Long term goals Better metadata extraction (see some of the sprints above) Integration with other computers and mobile devices. Video Zeitgeist video GAJ video Mockups And Current Usage Some work was done by the City of Largo in the past which replicated some of the features of the Activity Journal. Possibly some of this work can result in ideas for improving the User Interface. Mockups And Usage. Sub Pages /BolzanoIdeas /CityOfLargo /Ideas
http://live.gnome.org/action/show/GnomeActivityJournal?action=show&redirect=GnomeZeitgeist

691 visualizing.org
Visualizing.org is a community of creative people working to make sense of complex issues through data and design… and it’s a shared space and free resource to help you achieve this goal. Why Visualizing.org? By some estimates, we now create more data each year than in the entirety of prior human history. Data visualization helps us approach, interpret, and extract knowledge from this information. Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen government agencies, NGOs, and companies open up their data for the public to see and use. And we’ve seen data visualization figure more prominently in design curricula, conference programs, and the media. We created Visualizing.org because we want to help connect the proliferation of public data… with a community that can help us understand this data… with the general public. What is Visualizing.org? What can I do on the site? For designers: Visualizing is a place to showcase your work, get feedback, ensure that your work is seen by lots of people and gets used by teachers, journalists, and conference organizers to help educate the public about various world issues Visualizing is a free resource to search for data Use Visualizing to keep up with and be inspired by the latest work from other designers and design schools Learn about new visualization tools, blogs, books and other resources to help your work Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike License For teachers and schools: Visualizing is a place to exhibit the collective work of your students, organize assignments and class projects, and help your students find data for their own visualizations We’re working on new tools to help you share teaching material with other teachers As an Academic Partner, your students are eligible to participate in various design competitions – we’re hosting the first Visualizing Marathon in New York in October To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For bloggers and journalists: Visualizing is a resource to find data visualizations about a wide variety of world issues to inform and accompany your own reporting – and it’s easy to embed visualizations and widgets from Visualizing on your own site For conference organizers: As a Knowledge Partner, Visualizing allows you to use data visualizations at your conferences under a Creative Commons License To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For all: Visualizing is a new and fun online resource to learn more about the world in all its complexity and inter-dependence -- and become more comfortable with data and how it can be visually represented How does it work? The site is open and free to use. Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. Simply put, this means that anyone can share, copy, remix, or build upon the visualization as long as: (i) it is used non-commercially; and (ii) the visualization’s creator and source are credited.
http://www.visualizing.org/

616 Alphabet Soup modular synth
The STS Serge Modular can be a daunting system at first blush, especially for those who come from an "East Coast" modular synth background. My first synthesizers were Moog analogs and my first Analog Modular Synth was an Arrick "Dotcom" system - so I started out with East Coast paradigms that I had to "unlearn" in order to use my Serge Modular to the fullest. For those of you coming from a similar background or those just discovering the Serge Modular for the first time, these "Alphabet Soup" pages are dedicated to you! The Serge Modular is intuitive and fun to use - especially when you realize the main difference between a Serge Modular and most others has to do with the size of the building blocks, where a Moog or similar modular will have monolithic building blocks like ADSRs and Oscillators, the Serge can be more "low-level" in that you can build ADSRs and oscillators from Serge modules or, more properly, Function Blocks. These Function Blocks usually come bearing arcane names that have been shortened to an "Alphabet Soup" conglomeration of acronyms. In this series of articles, I'll be talking about some of the ways to approach these Function Blocks to create much more useful, surprising, complex or just simply fun synthesis features. The first function block we're going to look at is the "DSG", otherwise known as the Dual Universal Slope Generator. This mild-mannered module is in some ways the most powerful one in the entire Serge catalog because it can become so many different things depending on where you place the patch cords...as you'll soon see.
http://www.carbon111.com/alphabet1.html

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

431 Exploring the software behind Facebook, the world’s largest site | Royal Pingdom
At the scale that Facebook operates, a lot of traditional approaches to serving web content break down or simply aren’t practical. The challenge for Facebook’s engineers has been to keep the site up and running smoothly in spite of handling close to half a billion active users. This article takes a look at some of the software and techniques they use to accomplish that.
http://royal.pingdom.com/2010/06/18/the-software-behind-facebook/

301 Yamaha CS-15 mods: info and modification description (contribution by Don Solaris)
The original CS-15 is a great monophonic synth from the late 70's. It has a specific dual 12 dB multimode filter structure and a dual signal path. However these two filters are permanently set into parallel connection. This can be sometimes limiting, specially when more filter power is required (i.e. 24 dB response). One of the mods here will provide your CS-15 with serial filter connection - the 24dB mode. Of course, switch is included so that you can always bring back the original unmodified parallel filter routing the 12dB + 12 dB mode. One of the features that make CS-15 specific (next to parallel filters) is the ultra fast LFO that will go all the way up to 100 Hz. There are no many analog synths with LFOs that can go that fast (most end at 10-15 Hz). The potentiometer is used to tune from 0.1 Hz to 100 Hz. If you look at the numbers, this is quite a big range, and we said majority of LFO modulations are performed in up to 10 Hz range. The same is applied on CS-15's LFO potentiometer. That means, you can precisely tune from 0.1 Hz to 10 Hz (over 80% of potentiometer's turn ). However, going from 30 Hz to 100 Hz occupies only 10% of the potentiometer's turn. So if you were to perform some kind FM or Ring Mod effects, this might become a tricky job, as it requires precise tuning, but instead potentiometer jumps from i.e. 20 Hz into 40, then 70 then 100 Hz. Please note, this doesn't have anything to do with potentiometer's condition (cleaning). No matter how good you clean it, the same problem will exist, simply because this is the physical precision limit of the potentiometer. The only solution is to expand the precision in the high frequency range. In other words, we will expand 10% of potentiometer's turn into some 80% or more. Switch is included to provide the original unmodified version.
http://homepage.mac.com/synth_seal/html/ds_cs15mod.html

297 Synth Finder v5
Find the synth that is right for you! Now you can easily find the synthesizer that you have been searching for. Simply choose the options from the menu to the left that best describe the types of synthesizers you are looking for and we'll do the rest! You may choose any options and in any combination. For example, simply choose 'Analog' for a complete list of all analog synths, or get more specific and choose additional options for a more personalized set of results. Note that we only list synths that are featured in our database here at the Vintage Synth Explorer. For more details and descriptions of what the Synth Finder options mean, click here.
http://www.vintagesynth.com/synthfinder/

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