100SILEX, de 0 ŕ 100 s: suggest
1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1097 synth books
Here's a list of books relating to synthesizers and electronic music that we think are worth reading. Click on the image to go to Amazon.com and view more information and purchase them. Feel free to suggest a book. We do not sell books. Synthesizers.com Modular Analog Music Synthesizers Synthesizers.com, synthesizer, synth, synthesizers, modular, analog, arrick, analogue, keyboard, music, sound, effects, patch, vco, vcf, vca, ladder, oscillator, voltage control, low pass, filter, amplifier, envelope generator, CD, MP3, reverb, pan, fade, mixer, noise, sample, hold, sequencer, roland, moog, SEM, oberheim, yamaha, arp, 2500, 2600, vintage, vocoder, filter bank, ring modulator, sampler, clipper, rectifier, fuzz, multiple, processor, switch, interface, state variable, noise
http://www.synthesizers.com/books.html

714 30 free programming eBooks « citizen428.blog()
Since this post got quite popular I decided to incorporate some of the excellent suggestions posted in the comments, so this list now has more than 40 books in it. [UPDATED: 2010-10-12] Learning a new programming language always is fun and there are many great books legally available for free online. Here’s a selection of 30 of them: Lisp/Scheme: How to Desing Programs Interpreting Lisp (PDF, suggested by Gary Knott) Let Over Lambda On Lisp Practical Common Lisp Programming in Emacs Lisp Programming Languages. Application and Interpretation (suggested by Alex Ott) Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days Visual LISP Developer’s Bible (suggested by “skatterbrainz”) Ruby: Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Design Patterns in Ruby Learn to Program MacRuby: The Definitive Guide Mr. Neighborly’s Humble Little Ruby Book (suggested by @tundal45) Programming Ruby Read Ruby 1.9 Ruby Best Practices Ruby on Rails Tutorial Book (suggested by @tundal45) Javascript: Building iPhone Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript Eloquent Javascript jQuery Fundamentals Mastering Node Haskell: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good Real World Haskell Erlang: Concurrent Programming in Erlang Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good Python: Dive into Python How to Think Like a Computer Scientist – Learning with Python Smalltalk: Dynamic Web Development with Seaside Pharo by Example (based on the next book in this list, suggested by Anonymous) Squeak by Example Misc: Algorithms The Art of Assembly Language Beginning Perl Building Accessible Websites (suggested by Joe Clark) The C Book C# Yellow Book (suggested by Joe Wyatt) Compiler Construction Dive Into HTML 5 (suggested by @til) Higher-Order Perl The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages (suggested by “Def”) An Introduction to R Learn Prolog Now! Objective-C 2.0 Essentials Programming Scala Of course there are many more free programming eBooks, but this list consists of the ones I read or want(ed) to read. This is far from comprehensive and languages that are completely missing are mostly left out on purpose (e.g. PHP, C++, Java). I’m sure somebody else made a list for them somewhere.
http://citizen428.net/archives/434

672 101 Absolutely Breathtaking Infrared Photographs | Tutorial9
There is nothing quite like Infrared Photography. In this showcase, over 100 phenomenal photos have been gathered, as well as some tutorials and equipment suggestions for aspiring photographers. freebies & resources,roundups
http://www.tutorial9.net/resources/101-absolutely-breathtaking-infrared-photographs/

608 Stories In Flight | HTML5/CSS3 Cheatsheet
Here are some simple cut-and-paste examples of HTML5/CSS3 features that are currently (mid-2010) usable across a number of web browsers, chief among them Firefox, Safari, Chrome and Opera. For many of the CSS3 examples, Internet Explorer is the lone holdout with a limited number of workarounds, however these features degrade gracefully and may still be useful on new projects as long as this limitation is kept in mind. Both for SVG and Canvas there exist solid workarounds in the form of JavaScript libraries that allow even Internet Explorer to display these new objects, and in the case of SVGweb it may be a good idea to use this workaround for all browsers to limit the variability of the SVG rendering across platforms. Please note: With the exception of SVGWeb, no Internet Explorer workarounds have been included on this page - most of the examples will therefore not work in IE6, IE7 or IE8. And if you want to discuss any of the code below or leave a correction or suggestion, you can leave comments below and here is also The Web We Should Have on my blog. Thanks! On this page: HTML5 DOCTYPE Rounded Corners Rounded Corners Redux: Circles Box Shadows Text Shadows Border Images Transform Rotate Column Layout SVG Canvas Canvas Text Canvas Text Rotate Some more complex subjects are also discussed in these separate pages: CSS3 Transforms Ruby Annotations Multiple Background Images HTML5 Audio and JavaScript Control HTML5 Audio Data API - Spectrum Visualizer JavaScript: Binary Loader Google Font API and Font Loading Behavior JavaScript: Sorting DIVs JavaScript: HTML5 Video with SRT Subtitles ...and don't forget to leave some comments below!
http://www.storiesinflight.com/html5/

523 Yamaha CS-01 Resonance Mod
Just to get this up here. I hope to make this clearer soon... This shows how you can modify the Yamaha CS-01 Mk1 to: 1) have variable resonance control, by hijacking the Breath Control VCF potentiometer a) remove the 10k resistor near the VCF chip. b) cut the traces (or lift the pins) of the Breath Control VCF pot that connect it to GND and the Breath Control jack. I lifted the pins just to avoid cutting PCB traces c) remove the 39k resistor tied to the wiper of the VCF pot. d) solder wires from one side of the pot and the pot wiper and run these wires over to the holes that used to contain the 10k resistor near the VCF chip e) I'd suggest adjusting the resonance trimmer that's near the VCF chip to make your new Resonance control self-oscillate near the end of the rotation. why? because this filter gets out of control in a very loud and dramatic way. I don't think this VCF chip was designed for stable self-oscillation - that may explain why, in the CS-01 Mk2, when they gave you analog control of the resonance, they used a different 24dB VCF chip. 2) have variable VCA "drone" by hijacking the Breath Control VCA potentiometer. a) remove the 1k resistor that grounds usually-closed terminal of the breath control jack to GND b) solder a 47k resistor from the ungrounded, non-wiper terminal of the pot to -9V. c) when the VCA drone pot is now fully on, you'll always get a DCO-VCF signal running to the power amp. this mod keeps the VCA only partially open, and you can still superimpose the EG over the drone. I did this because I don't have a spec sheet on the VCA chip and I didn't want to risk having the EG slamming the VCA while the drone was going full on (basically, I don't know the max CV that the VCA chip can tolerate). so if you just use the drone, you'll have to increase the volume at the power amp. But now the front-panel VCA slider actually becomes useful, since if you don't want the EG to affect the drone, just turn that down to nothing! Sorry I don't have actual pics of the mod up! Perhaps someday soon...
http://home.earthlink.net/~kerrybradley/id11.html

386 Forums ARTE Radio
ARTE RADIO En réaction aux sons Pour réagir à nos reportages, fictions, documentaires, créations sonores... Laissez donc vos oreilles s'exprimer ! Compliments et remarques acerbes Un bravo, une critique, un commentaire à adresser à ARTE Radio ? Bien vu : c'est ici. Aide et entraide Le mode d'emploi interactif d'ARTE Radio. Un bug, un bzzz, une suggestion, une incompréhension ? C'est là que ça se passe ! CRÉATION Bidouilleurs sonores Quels micros, quels enregistreurs, quels logiciels ? Partagez vos astuces de tournage et techniques de montage. Amoureux de la radio et de l'audio Coups de coeur, coups de rage, annonces et dénonces... C'est le coin des fondus de la création radiophonique. Audioblogueurs Un forum tout chaud pour les créateurs et auditeurs des audioblogs d'ARTE Radio.
http://www.arteradio.com/forum/forums/list.page

257 21 Creative Ways To Increase Your Facebook Fanbase | Social Media Examiner
Facebook fan page marketing: 21 ways to create strategic visibility and promote your Facebook fan page facebook fan page marketing, facebookk fan page, ,buddy media,bullseye gives,canvas page,email signature,facebook,facebook advertising,facebook autograph,facebook badge,facebook comment feature,facebook contest,facebook extended info,facebook fan page,facebook fanbase,facebook friends,facebook invitation,facebook landing tap,facebook logo,facebook marketing,facebook marketing an hour a day,facebook personal profile,facebook profile,facebook promotional guidelines,facebook tag,facebook text message,facebook users,facebook video,facebook votes,facebook wall post,facebook welcome video,facebook widget,facebookk share button,fan count,fan page,fan page broadcast,fanappz,fbml,hootsuite,involver,join our fan page,live stream,nick oneil,page badge,profile html,social media,social plugins,social proof,steve spangler,suggest to friends,tag photos,target,the fan box,threadless,twitter,video,video streaming app,virtue,vpype,welcome page,wildfire apps
http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/21-creative-ways-to-increase-your-facebook-fanbase/

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