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1207 GTmetrix | Website Speed and Performance Optimization
GTmetrix is a free tool that analyzes your page's speed performance. Using Page Speed and YSlow, GTmetrix generates scores for your pages and offers actionable recommendations on how to fix them.
http://gtmetrix.com/

1097 synth books
Here's a list of books relating to synthesizers and electronic music that we think are worth reading. Click on the image to go to Amazon.com and view more information and purchase them. Feel free to suggest a book. We do not sell books. Synthesizers.com Modular Analog Music Synthesizers Synthesizers.com, synthesizer, synth, synthesizers, modular, analog, arrick, analogue, keyboard, music, sound, effects, patch, vco, vcf, vca, ladder, oscillator, voltage control, low pass, filter, amplifier, envelope generator, CD, MP3, reverb, pan, fade, mixer, noise, sample, hold, sequencer, roland, moog, SEM, oberheim, yamaha, arp, 2500, 2600, vintage, vocoder, filter bank, ring modulator, sampler, clipper, rectifier, fuzz, multiple, processor, switch, interface, state variable, noise
http://www.synthesizers.com/books.html

1014 Nord Modular Tips & Tricks
synth clavia Nord Modular & Micro Modular V3.03 tips & tricks Welcome to the Nord Modular and Micro Modular 'tips and tricks' section! The workshops of this section are created by a very skilled Nord Modular user: Rob Hordijk. On the 'tips and tricks' pages you will find various information regarding sound synthesis techniques. With every topic comes a workshop where you can follow the practical, non-mathematical, musician-oriented examples. The patches are kept as simple as possible showing only the basic connections. So it's up to you to color the tone to your liking, add modulation, etc., thus turning them into musically useful patches. Occasionally there might be a 'professional' patch as a bonus. If you have a Nord Modular or Nord MicroModular synthesizer you can download the example patches directly from the workshops into the Modular Editor V3.03 program and your synth and play with them. Just click on the patch image to download the actual patch to your Modular. If you do not have a Nord Modular you can download the Modular Editor V3.03 software here and check out the patches visually. Another very skilled Nord Modular/G2 user - Roland Kuit - has made the E-Book "SoundLab". This book covers synthesis techniques from A-Z, history of electronic music and composing techniques. For more info about the SoundLab E-Book, please visit: http://rolandkuit.blogspot.com/Topics available: Basics of sound synthesis on the Nord Modular This extensive section describes the basics of synthesis. (By Rob Hordijk) Basic synthesis Oscillator synchronisation This topic covers hardsync, softsync, FM-sync and VOSIM, a special application of sync. (By Rob Hordijk) Sync workshop Frequency Modulation This topic covers different types of FM, like linear FM, Phase Modulation and fixed formant FM. (By Rob Hordijk) FM Workshop Using the delay module It's too short for echos, but it's a valuable tool that can be used in a variety of ways, creating both sound effects as well as physical models of plucked string sounds and resonant bodies. (By Rob Hordijk) Delay Module Workshop Using logic modules Mastering those yellow connections. (By Rob Hordijk) Logic Workshop
http://www.clavia.se/nordmodular/Modularzone/index.html#SyncWorkshop

967 Anarchestra: www.anarchestra.net
Anarchestra is a group of exerimental musical instruments and the people who play them. The instruments, built by Alex Ferris, are predominantly steel with a few adapted parts, such as tuning machines and mouthpieces. The instruments were built to encourage non-musicians to explore the making of sound, to allow experienced musicians to make sound unconstricted by their technical habits and preconceptions, and to provide an alternative vocabulary of musical sounds. Musical Instrument Construction,Musical Instrument Design,Experimental Musical Instruments,Experimental Music,New Music,New Musical Instruments,Avant-Garde Music,Improvisation,Collective Improvisation,Free Jazz,Anarchist Music,Anarchist composition,Anarchist Aesthetics,Aesthetics of music,Music theory,Alternative Music,Alternative Tuning,Steel Musical Instruments,Welded Musical Instruments,Punk,Noise,Noyz,21st century music,post-modern music
http://www.anarchestra.net/

781 Atlas obscura
About the Atlas Obscura Welcome to the Atlas Obscura, a compendium of this age's wonders, curiosities, and esoterica. The Atlas Obscura is a collaborative project with the goal of cataloging all of the singular, eccentric, bizarre, fantastical, and strange out-of-the-way places that get left out of traditional travel guidebooks and are ignored by the average tourist. If you're looking for miniature cities, glass flowers, books bound in human skin, gigantic flaming holes in the ground, phallological museums, bone churches, balancing pagodas, or homes built entirely out of paper, the Atlas Obscura is where you'll find them. The Atlas Obscura is not just about collecting oddities. In an age where everything seems to have been explored and there is nothing new to be found, the Atlas Obscura celebrates a different way of traveling, and a different lens through which to view the world. The Atlas Obscura depends on our community of far-flung explorers to find and report back about the world's wonders and curiosities. If you have been to, know of, or have heard about a place that belongs in the Atlas Obscura, we want you to tell us about it. Anyone and everyone is welcome and encouraged to nominate places for inclusion, and to edit content already in the Atlas. Thanks for stopping by, and good exploring!
http://atlasobscura.com/globe/europe/france?page=3

777 SPERRZONE: [ K E Y C H A I N S ]: Zazzle.com Store
About Beat Hauser, SPERRZONE Beat Hauser is interested in industrial archaeology and history of Europe. His special area is the brewing industry of Switzerland and the former German Democratic Republic. Since 2003 he is taking pictures of industrial areas and abandoned places within all Europe. On his web site SPERRZONE (www.sperrzone.net) he does not only present his own pictures, but also some information about the related factories and places as well as historical photo post cards, old letter heads, labels, advertisings to document the history of the factories. Most pictures are taken in abandoned factories. Abandoned places and industrial ruins are generally seen as “spots of dirt” and people feel uncomfortable around them. Often such places have a very long and interesting history, which seems almost forgotten today. Instead of the activity of former days there is nothing but silence and emptiness. Instead of windows, black holes are staring out of the walls. But very often the architecture of elapsed eras is attractive and astonishing. In combination with the emptiness and beginning decay, such places often spread the impression of a dream world. Decay and nature give new structures to strictly geometric forms and lines, e.g. in production halls. Moisture, moss and rust give new colors to gray halls. Beat Hauser tries to capture these impressions with his photographs. Aesthetics of decay is illustrated in its huge variety from huge industrial plants to small details. Past exhibitions 10 Jun – 1 Jul 2007 3Fotografen3, Alte evangelische Kirche Kirchzarten (Exhibition of the 3 winners of the „KirchzARTener FOTOsalons 2006“) 2 Dec – 3 Dec 2006 KirchzARTener FOTOsalon 2006, Kurhaus Kirchzarten (Photo contest with 54 participants, 1. rank) 20 Nov – 21 Nov 2004 KirchzARTener FOTOsalon 2004, Kurhaus Kirchzarten (Photo contest with 46 participants, 11. rank) Several beamer shows at party events of „Rigor Mortis“ and „Solanaceae“ in Basle, Aarau, Pratteln and Reinach (all Switzerland) sperrzone, industry, industrial, archaeology, industrie, industriekultur, zerfall, decay, architektur, architecture
http://www.zazzle.com/sperrzone/gifts?cg=196119980926265824

529 SynthesisWorkshops
synth modular Sound synthesis and sound design Music has brought pleasure and entertainment to mankind throughout the whole of history. Each person is by nature equipped with one of the most elaborate and emotional musical instruments; the human voice. Whenever people feel good music seems to fit the occasion, and it is considered quite natural to hum or sing a song. Musical instruments have brought their own moods to music and at the current moment in human evolution there is an enormous variety of musical instruments available. The twentieth century has seen the development of a range of new and exciting electronic musical instruments. These electronic instruments are very flexible, they can produce a wide range of timbres and can be amplified to whatever loudness level sounds best for the occasion. Most of these electronic instruments are played by a keyboard, but in essence the keyboard can be replaced by any electromechanical device that is able to transform a movement caused by a human interaction into an electrical signal that can drive the sound generating core of the electronic instrument. All sorts of technical and scientific developments have helped to create electronic instruments and the human interface to play them. Still, music is an art and not really a hard science, although music and sound have for a long time been subject to various scientific research. An important realization is that science can not really explain why much music is such a pleasure to listen to and such a joy to make. Which is not a bad thing, as probably no one is waiting for science to take the fun out of music by applying formalized rules and templates on what is also subject to ‘feel’. So, although this book covers techniques that lean heavily on scientific research, the application of these techniques will in general be aimed at creating fun. There are a lot of professionals working with sound and even more people that make music for their personal enjoyment. Mastery of sound synthesis is valuable to all of them. Still, it won’t be easy to please everyone with one single book, as some people will be more interested in how things work and others might want practical examples that just work. The aim of this book is that it can at least be used as a practical guide in workshops and courses in electronic music, covering some essential basics that are needed to operate the equipment used in sound synthesis in a way that makes some sense. Additionally it can be used to explore techniques to find out how they can help in the development of one’s own musical style. Sound synthesis is the art of creating sounds by using suitable electronic means, using either analog or digital electronic devices. Sound design is the art of creating particular sounds using sound synthesis techniques. The definition of sound design as used here might be confusing to some, as the name sound design is also used in the discipline in industrial design that occupies itself with how mass produced objects should sound. Examples are how the sound of cars or ladyshaves are ‘designed’ to sound pleasing while in use. Which of course has nothing to do at all with music or sound synthesizers. This book puts the emphasis on the various synthesis techniques for musical purposes and how to setup sound synthesizers to create a large range of characteristic musical sounds. The art of musical sound design is left to the artist.
http://www.xs4all.nl/~rhordijk/G2Pages/

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

474 Why Intelligent People Fail
Why Intelligent People Fail Content from Sternberg, R. (1994). In search of the human mind. New York: Harcourt Brace. 1. Lack of motivation. A talent is irrelevant if a person is not motivated to use it. Motivation may be external (for example, social approval) or internal (satisfaction from a job well-done, for instance). External sources tend to be transient, while internal sources tend to produce more consistent performance. 2. Lack of impulse control. Habitual impulsiveness gets in the way of optimal performance. Some people do not bring their full intellectual resources to bear on a problem but go with the first solution that pops into their heads. 3. Lack of perserverance and perseveration. Some people give up too easily, while others are unable to stop even when the quest will clearly be fruitless. 4. Using the wrong abilities. People may not be using the right abilities for the tasks in which they are engaged. 5. Inability to translate thought into action. Some people seem buried in thought. They have good ideas but rarely seem able to do anything about them. 6. Lack of product orientation. Some people seem more concerned about the process than the result of activity. 7. Inability to complete tasks. For some people nothing ever draws to a close. Perhaps it’s fear of what they would do next or fear of becoming hopelessly enmeshed in detail. 8. Failure to initiate. Still others are unwilling or unable to initiate a project. It may be indecision or fear of commitment. 9. Fear of failure. People may not reach peak performance because they avoid the really important challenges in life. 10. Procrastination. Some people are unable to act without pressure. They may also look for little things to do in order to put off the big ones. 11. Misattribution of blame. Some people always blame themselves for even the slightest mishap. Some always blame others. 12. Excessive self-pity. Some people spend more time feeling sorry for themselves than expending the effort necessary to overcome the problem. 13. Excessive dependency. Some people expect others to do for them what they ought to be doing themselves. 14. Wallowing in personal difficulties. Some people let their personal difficulties interfere grossly with their work. During the course of life, one can expect some real joys and some real sorrows. Maintaining a proper perspective is often difficult. 15. Distractibility and lack of concentration. Even some very intelligent people have very short attention spans. 16. Spreading oneself too think or too thick. Undertaking too many activities may result in none being completed on time. Undertaking too few can also result in missed opportunities and reduced levels of accomplishment. 17. Inability to delay gratification. Some people reward themselves and are rewarded by others for finishing small tasks, while avoiding bigger tasks that would earn them larger rewards. 18. Inability to see the forest for the trees. Some people become obsessed with details and are either unwilling or unable to see or deal with the larger picture in the projects they undertake. 19. Lack of balance between critical, analytical thinking and creative, synthetic thinking. It is important for people to learn what kind of thinking is expected of them in each situation. 20. Too little or too much self-confidence. Lack of self-confidence can gnaw away at a person’s ability to get things done and become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Conversely, individuals with too much self-confidence may not know when to admit they are wrong or in need of self-improvement.
http://www.acceleratingfuture.com/michael/works/intelligentfailure.htm

440 A List Apart: Articles: Taking Advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 with Modernizr
Ten years ago, only the most cutting-edge web designers used CSS for layouts and styling. Browser support for CSS layouts was slim and buggy, so these people advocated for web standards adherence, while creating hacks that made CSS layouts work in all browsers. One hack that became widely used was browser sniffing: Detecting which browser and version the user had by looking at the navigator.userAgent property in JavaScript. Browser sniffing allowed for quick and easy code forking, allowing developers to target different browsers with different instructions. Today, CSS-based layouts are commonplace and every browser has pretty solid support for them. But now we have CSS3 and HTML5, and the situation is repeating itself—different browsers demonstrate varying levels of support for these new technologies. We’ve smartened up, however, and no longer employ CSS hacks nor use browser sniffing—an unreliable, poor practice. We’ve also convinced more and more clients that websites don’t need to look exactly the same in every browser. So how do we deal with this new but familiar problem? Simple: We use feature detection, which means that we do not ask the browser “who are you?” and make unreliable assumptions from there on. Instead we ask the browser, “can you do this and that?” It’s a simple way to test browser capabilities, but doing all these tests manually all the time gets tiresome. To solve that problem (and others), you can use Modernizr.
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/taking-advantage-of-html5-and-css3-with-modernizr/

405 AudioLemon: HOWTO: Build A Steampunk Oscilloscope
AudioLemon is a blog that looks at all things audio related. Synths, samplers, software, effects and a little bit of electronic music and culture. A steampunk oscilloscope built by Andrew Smith from parts found in a junk box. "Although not intended to be fully functional it does actually work." It's looks so cute... if you have the DIY skills you can read an article over on electronicsweekly detailing the build, components used and a schematic. "I discovered that I had a really cute little 7cm CRT in the loft, together with several other valves of different types, and it seemed a good idea to make something decorative with them. For me, a lot of the charm of this piece resides in the unconventional layout and design, using a polished wooden box instead of the more usual metal chassis."
http://audiolemon.blogspot.com/2007/10/howto-build-steampunk-oscilloscope.html

340 7-things-to-stop-doing-now-on-facebook: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
Using a Weak Password Avoid simple names or words you can find in a dictionary, even with numbers tacked on the end. Instead, mix upper- and lower-case letters, numbers, and symbols. A password should have at least eight characters. One good technique is to insert numbers or symbols in the middle of a word, such as this variant on the word "houses": hO27usEs! Leaving Your Full Birth Date in Your Profile More from ConsumerReports.org: • Millions of Users Exposing Personal Information • Tested: 119 Laptops, Desktops, Netbooks and iPad • Electronics Reviews It's an ideal target for identity thieves, who could use it to obtain more information about you and potentially gain access to your bank or credit card account. If you've already entered a birth date, go to your profile page and click on the Info tab, then on Edit Information. Under the Basic Information section, choose to show only the month and day or no birthday at all. Overlooking Useful Privacy Controls For almost everything in your Facebook profile, you can limit access to only your friends, friends of friends, or yourself. Restrict access to photos, birth date, religious views, and family information, among other things. You can give only certain people or groups access to items such as photos, or block particular people from seeing them. Consider leaving out contact info, such as phone number and address, since you probably don't want anyone to have access to that information anyway. Popular Stories on Yahoo!: • 20 Best Cities to Ride Out the Recession • Wealth Ranking: You're Richer Than You Think • 7 Expenses You Can Ditch in Retirement More from Yahoo! Finance Posting Your Child's Name in a Caption Don't use a child's name in photo tags or captions. If someone else does, delete it by clicking on Remove Tag. If your child isn't on Facebook and someone includes his or her name in a caption, ask that person to remove the name. Mentioning That You'll Be Away From Home That's like putting a "no one's home" sign on your door. Wait until you get home to tell everyone how awesome your vacation was and be vague about the date of any trip. Letting Search Engines Find You To help prevent strangers from accessing your page, go to the Search section of Facebook's privacy controls and select Only Friends for Facebook search results. Be sure the box for public search results isn't checked. Permitting Youngsters to Use Facebook Unsupervised Facebook limits its members to ages 13 and over, but children younger than that do use it. If you have a young child or teenager on Facebook, the best way to provide oversight is to become one of their online friends. Use your e-mail address as the contact for their account so that you receive their notifications and monitor their activities. "What they think is nothing can actually be pretty serious," says Charles Pavelites, a supervisory special agent at the Internet Crime Complaint Center. For example, a child who posts the comment "Mom will be home soon, I need to do the dishes" every day at the same time is revealing too much about the parents' regular comings and goings.
http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home/article/109538/7-things-to-stop-doing-now-on-facebook

305 45 Amazing and Free Photoshop Actions | Vandelay Design Blog
Photoshop actions allow designers and photographers to automate common sequences for increased efficiency. There are countless actions available that can be downloaded for free, and in this post we'll feature 45 of them. Some of these are individual actions and others are sets that include multiple actions. Photoshop Action 15
http://vandelaydesign.com/blog/tools/photoshop-actions/

258 SEOmoz | 30 SEO Problems & the Tools to Solve Them (Part 2 of 2)
Last November, I authored a popular post on SEOmoz detailing 15 SEO Problems and the Tools to Solve Them. It focused on a number of free tools and SEOmoz PRO tools. Today, I'm finishing up that project with a stab at another set of thorny issues that continually confound SEOs and how some new ...
http://www.seomoz.org/blog/30-seo-problems-the-tools-to-solve-them-part-2

140 A.Ruzanov - Flashblock for Opera 9
UserJS-only version: FlashBlock.js (press Ctrl+Shift+F or Ctrl+Alt+F for permanent unblocking on the site; use Ctrl+Click for saving flash-video). All versions for Opera 8-10: Flashblocker.zip Replaces Flash objects with a button you can click to view them. Two variants: with text and graphic buttons. And simple variant, without buttons. Based on Flashblock for FF and GspuSi Flash blocker for Opera 9.
http://my.opera.com/Lex1/blog/flashblock-for-opera-9

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