100SILEX, de 0 100 s: virtual
1452 virtualbox.org • View topic - Fail: How to move a VM to another disk (same machine)

https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=48258

1383 Développons en Java - La JVM (Java Virtual Machine)
java tutoriel tutorial cours didacticiel dej jvm virtual machine
http://www.jmdoudoux.fr/java/dej/chap-jvm.htm

1282 Lotus Notes/Domino - Tools and utilities for Administrators and Users.
VirtualObjectives provides IT consulting services for Microsoft SQL Server administration, Tools and utilities for Windows environments, and Lotus Notes/Domino databases/utilities for system administrators. virtual,objectives,lotus,notes,domino,database,utility,utilities,program,application,free,freeware,windows,development,john buoro,notes.ini,notesini,killnotes,stopnotes,moontool,log analyser,log analyzer,analyser,analyzer,sendsmtp,mail box cleaner,notesrepair,repair notes,repair lotus notes,repair,compact,desktop,workspace,desktop6.ndk,error code,text formatting,text tools,csv,col2csv,col2tab,csv2tab,tab2csv,csv2html,html2csv,csv2xml,xml2csv,epolicy,policy,netware quota,user registration,id store,partcopy,stopnotes,killnotes,recover,password,mame,frontend,mamerunner,emulator,partcopy,sql server,clean drive pro,clean drive,dts,dts package,sql,sql server,script,rconsole
http://www.virtualobjectives.com.au/notesdomino/notesdomino-index.htm

1205 Remove Logos or Watermarks From Video with VirtualDub and DeLogo Filter - WJunction - Webmaster Forum!
This is tutorial how to remove logo or watermark Download Videodub Code: http://virtualdub.sourceforge.net/ Download delogo filter Code: http://neuron2 Remove,Logos,Watermarks,Video,VirtualDub,DeLogo,Filter, Remove Logos or Watermarks From Video with VirtualDub and DeLogo Filter, wjunction, webmasters, hosting, seedbox, rapidleech, servers, uploaders, uploading, uploaded, cyberlocker, server, admin, forums, websites, coding, programming, money, marketing
http://www.wjunction.com/13-tutorials-guides/84403-remove-logos-watermarks-video-virtualdub-delogo-filter.html

1043 Monotribe, MIDI and me
synth When I heard about the monotribe, I had my doubts. Mostly that there’s only one pattern, which is 8 steps long. Well, there are 8 extra steps for the drums, as well as a “flux mode” which records your movements on the ribbon continuously. In that sense, it is limited, and is an instrument made to be played with your hands, rather than be programmed. But as it turned out, this was a design choice, and not a technical limitation. I can easily imagine why. They wanted it to seem as analog and playful as possible. Same thing with MIDI. Officially, the monotribe doesn’t support MIDI. It does however offer a sync pulse output and input. This allows it to be synced to other monotribes, modular synthesizers or even Korg’s own virtual iMS-20/iElectribe, using a special sync app on a second iPhone/Pod/Pad. However, the lack of MIDI is still a slight limitation.
http://blog.gg8.se/wordpress/2011/08/14/monotribe-midi-and-me/

1010 PowerFX Vocaloid 2 Sweet Ann
Yamaha’s Vocaloid technology has now been upgraded to version 2 and Sweet Ann, from PowerFX, is the first virtual singer based on the new release. So just how much further forward have Yamaha moved their intriguing vocal synthesis technology? software, review, PowerFX, Vocaloid 2, Sweet Ann, Singing Synthesis, PC, John Walden, Yamaha, Vocaloid, technology, virtual singer, vocal synthesis, real-time, VST Instrument
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan08/articles/sweetann.htm

987 Alesis Micron
This is one of the cutest, smallest, yet most powerful synths I've ever put my hands on! The Micron is the sequel to the popular Ion, and while it can be considered as the Ion's younger brother, it actually has a few enhancements that are absent on the big bro. This is a very clean, precise, sparkly and definitely virtual analog (or analog modeled) sounding synth. Eight voices of polyphony are plenty for these types of units, but we would always want more. The synth engine is the same as the Ion though, but extra and welcome features include sequencing, arpeggio, and great on board percussion, and the ability to build patterns. The Micron really sounds bigger than it looks: while personally I feel that the character of its synth engine leans on the more digitally precise DSP side of virtual analog technology, it's certainly capable of huge, warm and fat sounds. The main panel is logically laid out and easy to understand. At the very left, a big red knob offers volume control; the two "m1" and "m2" sliders provide useful modulation control, typically (but not always) vibrato and filter cutoff. The three knobs labeled "x", "y" and "z" also offer way of modulating sounds, and can (ought to) be assigned to your favorite parameters. Two octave buttons, and other useful commands such as tap (tempo) and latch (sustains the notes) occupy the space at the left of the two-line backlit green display. Finally, a multi-function matrix with push-down knob serve as the central nerve system of the machine, letting you easily access programs, setups, configurations, patterns and rhythms. You do the programming by turning the knob to view the various editing pages. In all, it's simple to program, and the manual does a fantastic job of being easy to follow and easy to understand.
http://www.synthmania.com/micron.htm

719 Facebook owns us — Copy me happy
Facebook has become the event planning system. It’s the place where you have all your friends (and other people) somewhat sorted and organized. All in all, it’s the organized system in the chaos that is otherwise known as the internets. This is leading Facebook towards a virtual monopoly. There are lots of issues with monopolies, but one of the more interesting ones when it comes to Facebook is the impact is has on our social lives, online as well as offline.
http://blog.brokep.com/2010/04/24/facebook-owns-us/

716 Welcome to Seppukoo / Assisting your virtual suicide

http://www.seppukoo.com/

701 How To Convince The Client That Your Design Is Perfect - Smashing Magazine
As designers who deal with clients, we all have to face one situation, no matter how difficult and uncomfortable, and that is guiding the client to accept that your design is perfect. Now, you already have the project, so this is not a matter of convincing them to pick you for the job. This is about getting them to see that your design satisfies their requirements and contains everything they want. We all have to take on this role of virtual tour guide and lead them through the project’s twists and turns, ensuring that the best interests of the client and website are served. We have to be the lighthouse, guiding the clients to shore. (Image credit) In the end, the final decision falls to the client, but there are times — and most of us have experienced them — when the client’s lack of expertise in the field affect the quality of the design. In such times, we have a responsibility to do everything in our power to convince the client that the design is perfect as it is, and that any further alteration would impair the website’s ability to communicate everything it needs to. This confrontation is not welcome by either party, but it is certainly necessary. Many designers want to avoid conflict and, as a result, cave to their clients at the slightest sign of disagreement, rather than spend time trying to convince them that they stand on the right side of the design decision. This is often a mistake and does not serve the design, which should be the paramount consideration. We owe it to our creative work to argue for whatever serves the design beyond all else, even though the client is footing the bill. We may end up having to give in to the client, but at least we tried. Below is an overview of some tips and techniques you can employ when you find yourself butting heads with a client. These approaches might work individually or in combination, but they all at least offer a launching point to help you put your best foot forward and lead the client exactly where they need to go.
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/10/06/how-to-convince-the-client-that-your-design-is-perfect/

525 Tek411: OSX in Virtual Box (Hackintoshed VM)
OSX in Virtual Box (Hackintoshed VM) How to create a Hackintoshed Virtualbox What you’ll need. An AMD or Intel system that supports hardware virtualization. The newest Virtualbox (get it off of filehippo.com). An OSX86 iso, Get it off of torrents if you don’t have one. After you have the above mentioned files install Virtualbox. Open up Virtualbox and click on New at the top left.
http://tek411.blogspot.com/2010/06/osx-in-virtual-box-hackintoshed-vm.html

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

398 The Virtual Scope Museum
oscilloscope
http://www.oszimuseum.de/cgi-bin/oszimuseum.pl?.cat=equipment/gallery&.page=gallery&.lang=dt

220 Music collaboration, share music tracks, Pro Tools, GarageBand, Sonar, remix, share beats - Kompoz.com
Compose music online. Collaborate with musicians and friends around the world. Download and upload music files, such as MP3 and more. music, music collaboration, compose, virtual band, mp3, indie music, creative commons, open source music, social network, friends, Web2.0, Web 2.0, jam online
http://www.kompoz.com/compose-collaborate/home.music

215 VirtualBox Virtual Appliances | VirtualBoxImages.com
VirtualBox Virtual Appliances Total Activated Virtual Computers: 30,262 VDI images of pre-installed "Open Source" Operating System distros. Pre-installed virtualbox images ready for you to explore and play with. VirtualBox runs on SunOS, OpenSolaris, Mac OS X, Windows, OS/2 and Linux. It's a computer inside your computer. Looking for OVFAppliances.com SugarSync Cloud Storage FREE Virtual Appliances available in the SugarSync Cloud. Direct HTTP download, no torrent client required. You receive 2Gig of FREE Cloud Storage Instantly run another operating system on your desktop in a window, on almost any computer. Implement full Linux functionality on an existing Windows Desktop or server. Windows XP Tutorial: 7 quick steps to using our VDI's Need a specific Application? Find an Image using the Pre-Installed Applications Index A number of Virtual Machines are also available in OVF Appliance" format
http://virtualboximages.com/

67 The Audio Playground Synthesizer Museum
The Audio Playground webpages offer a virtual tour of the collection and shows some of the the electronic instruments and gadgets which have shaped popular (and not so popular) music through the years -- from the earliest innovations, to more recent toys. Enjoy!
http://www.keyboardmuseum.com/play.html

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