100SILEX, de 0 100 s: was
1408 » Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Animodule.com
Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Here’s a quick photodoc of how I made a reusable SMT stencil from some aluminum siding I had laying around. It’s very simple to assemble and works great. Dirt cheap too. I had picked up a roll of aluminum flashing a few years ago to flash some chimneys I rebuilt/repointed and was curious to see how it would hold up as an SMT stencil. To buy an SMT stencil frame is near $1000 so I didn’t have much to lose if it didn’t work out. I cut the frame out of some birch plywood since I had some handy. Really any sturdy frame would do the trick. You could easily glue one together out of some 1x or trim board. I put a thicker sheet of aluminum down underneath the flashing to give the CNC endmill something sturdy to cut against and clamped it down stretched and tight. My thought there was that If I cut straight on the MDF it might push on the flashing and bend it before it cut through. A 1mm endmill did the trick. Each pass was .05mm deep. I pulled the Flashing tight and stapled it to the frame. No rocket science here. I taped up the inside edges so no solderpaste could squeeze between the frame and the stencil. I had some old screen print hinge boards so I just attached this frame the same way I would a screen print stencil. The only fiddly part was aligning the first PCB. You have to push around a little and lift the stencil and fiddle with it a little bit. Once I get all the pads lined up correctly I hold it in place and trace around it with a thin tip sharpie marker. Then you place the PCB in the outline. If you have the height adjusted correctly the stencil is sturdy enough to hold the PCB in place while you print the Solderpaste on it. just hold the stencil frame down and it pushes down on the PCB. I used a flexible putty knife as a squeegee. It worked fine. Cleanup was a breeze. Just scrape it off, unscrew the stencil frame from the hingeboard and stick it in the corner till you are ready to do another run.
http://www.animodule.com/diy-2/cut-simple-smt-stencil-from-common-aluminum-flashing-on-your-cnc/

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1333 Download OpenStreetMap data OSM
Commonly Used Formats europe-latest.osm.pbf, suitable for Osmium, Osmosis, imposm, osm2pgsql, mkgmap, and others. This file was last modified 19 hours ago and contains all OSM data up to 2013-05-28T18:59:04Z. File size: 10.3 GB; MD5 sum: c97ac9a7c90bc7791893f19fe9e7e3a3. europe-latest.shp.zip is not available for this region; try one of the sub-regions. Other Formats and Auxiliary Files europe-latest.osm.bz2, yields OSM XML when decompressed; use for programs that cannot process the .pbf format. This file was last modified 5 days ago. File size: 14.9 GB; MD5 sum: 087b5f040c89d6d64ea18503b2723d61. .poly file that describes the extent of this region. .osc.gz files that contain all changes in this region, suitable e.g. for Osmosis updates raw directory index allowing you to see and download older files
http://download.geofabrik.de/europe.html

1306 Cern
Twenty years of a free, open web On 30 April 1993 CERN published a statement that made World Wide Web technology available on a royalty free basis, allowing the web to flourish On 30 April 1993 CERN published a statement that made World Wide Web ("W3", or simply "the web") technology available on a royalty-free basis. By making the software required to run a web server freely available, along with a basic browser and a library of code, the web was allowed to flourish.
http://info.cern.ch/

1255 Sony Cassette Walkman Overview (1979 - 2003) - sonyvintage.com
Unofficial SONY vintage page Skip to content Home Personal Audio HiFi about sonyvintage.com My Collection ← Sony WM-WE1 (1997) Cassette Walkman 1979 → Sony Cassette Walkman Overview (1979 – 2003) Posted on February 18, 2012 by Quo TPS-L2 WM-2 WM-3 WM-3Ex WM-R2 WM-F2 WM-D6 WM-7 WM-DD WM-F5 WM-20 WM-F20 WM-DC2 WM-D6C WM-DDII WM-F15 WM-R15 WM-30 WM-F30 WM-40 WM-75 WM-F75 WM-F55 WM-55 WM-W800 WM-R55 WM-F85 WM-101 WM-F101 WM-F202 WM-R202 WM-F60 WM-57 WM-60 WM-F107 WM-D3 WM-109 WM-F109 WM-101 WM-102 WM-104 WM-F203 WM-51 WM-51 with radio WM-501 WM-504 WM-503 WM-509 WM-550C WM-52 WM-505 WM-701C WM-F701C WM-506 WM-F506 WM-F606 WM-609 WM-170/171/172 WM-F180 WM-F181 WM-607 WM-DD9 WM-R707 WM-F707 WM-702 WM-F702 WM-703C WM-507 WM-F507 WM-600 WM-190 WM-805 WM-EX80 WM-EX60 WM-EX70 WM-FX70 WM-EX85 WM-FX85 WM-EX90 WM-SX77 WM-WX88 WM-GX90 WM-EX88 WM-EX77 WM-FX77 WM-DX100 WM-EX78 WM-RX77 WM-EX66 WM-EX909 WM-GX77 WM-FX909 WM-EX707 WM-FX707 WM-FX505 WM-WX808 WM-EX606 WM-EX808/808HG WM-FX808 WM-GX707 WM-RX707 WM-EX999 WM-FX999 WM-EX777 WM-FX777 WM-EX555 WM-WX777 WM-EX666 WM-EX1・EX1HG WM-FX1 WM-EX511 WM-FX811 WM-EX911 WM-EX811 WM-GX711 WM-EJ95 WM-WX1 WM-GX312 WM-EX2 WM-FX2 WM-EX622 WM-FX822 WM-EQ2 WM-GX622 WM-EX922 WM-GX822 WM-RX822 WM-EX633 WM-EX641 WM-EX5 WM-FX5 WM-EX3 WM-FX833 WM-GX322 WM-MV1 WM-GX622 WM-GX655 WM-EQ3 WM-FX855 WM-WE1 WM-WE7 WM-FS1 WM-EX655 WM-EX7 WM-EQ5 WM-FK2 WM-EK1 WM-EQ9 WM-EX9 WM-EX677 WM-GX677 WM-FX877 WM-WE01 WM-FK5 WM-EK3 WM-EX20 WM-EX900 WM-EX600 WM-GX323 WM-GX200 WM-FX200 WM-EX2000 WM-EX910 WM-EX610 WM-EX615 WM-GX688 WM-GX400 WM-EX921 WM-EX621 WM-FX888 WM-EX631 WM-FX202 WM-GX202 WM-GX788 +22 0 This entry was posted in Cassette Walkman. Bookmark the permalink. ← Sony WM-WE1 (1997) Cassette Walkman 1979 → Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Name * Email * Website Comment You may use these HTML tags and attributes:
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http://www.sonyvintage.com/?p=1034

1254 SONY TC-D5 Pro II, an impressive machine
Hi there, I received yesterday a SONT TC-D5 Pro II. I have seen it in photos and read comments about its quality, similar to the D6C. I liked so much the design with the two VU meters, and it seemed to me that it belongs to an era when build quality was driven by other rules.
http://www.stereo2go.com/displayForumTopic/content/284032791466040094?reply=288255372213350915

1165 Coil - Logo T-shirt Industrial Synthpop
coil band industrial Coil - Logo T-shirt Industrial Synthpop
http://www.nuclearwasteunderground.com/servlet/the-94/Coil--dsh--Logo-T-dsh-shirt/Detail

1144 Synapse Magazine - Electronic Music and Synthesizers
Analog Synthesizers and Modular Synthesizers for electronic music and surround sound design synapse, analogue synthesizers, modular synthesizers, synthesizers, analog modular synthesizers, synthesizer, music synthesizer, synth, steiner filter, steiner VCF, synthacon, synapse, analog, electronic music, oscillator, voltage control, voltage controlled oscillator, wasp filter, envelope generator, sequencer, filter bank, ring modulator, cynthia webster
http://www.cyndustries.com/synapse/intro.cfm

1132 Mammoth Modular Synthesizer At MIT Museum
Just got an update from Joe Paradiso on his homebuilt mammoth analog modular synthesizer. He’s installed it in the MIT Museum and has completed a fairly epic patch which you can listen to (24 hours a day!) here. Joe will be at the museum this Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm, demoing the synth to visitors, so be sure to stop by if you’re in the neighborhood. Here’s some info from Joe on the construction and inspiration for the latest patch. The second patch I made at the MIT Museum is totally done now, and you can hear it live on the stream. Listen to it at http://synth.media.mit.edu, and let me know what you think if you’re inclined – it’s running in physical space in Quad, of course – stereo on the stream. Note that this one has absolutely NO sequencer of any sort on it – all of the patterns you hear were made entirely from hand-patched logic (counters, ands, ors, flip flops, ring counters, rate multipliers, etc.). It’s an entirely different kind of composition environment from the norm – you really need to simultaneously be an engineer while being an artist and something of a performer. The inspiration for this patch started with the Boredoms – if you don’t know who they are, you should (http://www.boredoms.jp/). In particular, I was thinking of SuperRoots 9. The beauty of the patching interface is that you can never exactly nail what you start out to attain, but on the other hand, you get drawn into places you wouldn’t have normally gone once you start. The 3 drummers that Yamantaka Eye performs with lay down a compelling rhythm that my hand-patched logic and analog processing can’t match, of course. But this patch definitely has a strange jumpy groove once it gets into gear, and the 2-chord pad is archetypical too. Yes, Boredoms rule today! BTW, this patch took every cord I had, plus a good 30 more wires just shoved into the pin jacks – check out the photos here and here – the latter shows the kind of logic section patching complexity you need to build a sonic environment like this one. I’m ripping this baby out next Thursday, as I’ll be at the museum next Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm to demonstrate the synthesizer to visitors – doing some very simple patches and showing off what the modules do in case anybody is interested in this. It will run continuously until then. Otherwise, enjoy the stream – there are moments of introspective drift in-between wild percussion (yes, Boredoms!). I might pull the percussion line back so it doesn’t come so often or regularly, but it’s essentially a wrap.
http://synth.media.mit.edu/

1109 Weekend with the Ricoh GRDIV |
I’ve fielded a lot of questions lately about Ricoh’s latest camera, the GRDIV. Honestly, it was getting a little tedious hearing about it haha. Although I suppose I understand considering there’s hardly anything written about it anywhere. I’ve been having a bit of a love affair with Ricoh’s film cameras the last little while so I hadn’t thought much about the GRDIV. After having a chance to get one though, I decided it a good idea to give it a go.
http://jtinseoul.wordpress.com/2011/11/06/weekend-with-the-ricoh-grdiv/

1083 colored screw
fasteners. Fastener Express offers one of the largest selections of high quality fasteners on the web. Specializing in aluminum screws, nuts and washers. fastener express,screws, aluminum screws, aluminum nuts, washers, nuts, washers, bolts, socket screws, wood screws, sheet metal screws, stainless steel, alloy, aluminum,blue anodized, hex screws, metric screws,metric fasteners, fastners, hobby screws, socket head cap screws, flat head, button head, steel plated, nylon screws, truss head, binder head, oval head, set screws, marine screws, model helicopter, model, modle, fastner, model train, model boats, robotics, miniature
http://www.fastener-express.com/search.aspx?find=m3+anodized

1078 The Modular Synth
A long time ago, in a galaxy far away, before your local music shop was packed with the latest digital synths, even before the early analogue monosynths, if you wanted a synthesizer you had to make it yourself. Modular synthesis is not in itself a different type of synthesis, but refers to the fact that a synth would be built up from individual components (modules) , which would be linked together (patched) in a configuration decided by the person doing the building. Compared with today's 'plug and play' synths which come with 100's of presets, GM soundsets, etc, this has the obvious disadvantage that 'recalling' a preset can only be done if your synth is patched together in exactly the same way every time and every controller has to be manually set to the same parameter. However, the big advantage of Modular synthesis, of course, is that, providing you have the right components, you can build practically anything you want, without being constrained by the 'hardwired' configurations of modern factory built synthesizers. The Pulsar/Scope Modular synth, like any other Modular 'soft synth' brings together the advantages of both Modular synths and modern factory built synths. Modular configurations can be saved as patches for total recall later on, and each patch can contain any number of presets, again for later recall. Furthermore, with a software modular, you can re-use each component as many times as you wish within one patch, you never run out of cables, you don't have to dedicate a whole room to the synth and the modules never suffer from physical damage. What's more, each parameter can be controlled by MIDI so parameter changes can be recorded into your sequencer in real-time.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/themodularsynth.shtml

1066 EML Electrocomp 101
Electronic Music Labs (EML), based in Vernon, CT, was a rather strange but interesting outfit that, for a brief period in the early 1970s, had some success in the commercial synthesizer market. The company was founded and largely run by electrical engineers rather than musicians, an attribute with both strengths and weaknesses.
http://home.hiwaay.net/~cornutt/Music/Web%20Page/EML.html

1052 Lab Overview
Not that I recommend this level of excitement to everyone, but this is my lab. It is my basement, and as you may note from the disheveled ceiling tiles up above, having this much equipment has actually forced me to purchase a separate AC unit for the basement. So my trendy two-zone AC house has now magically become a three-zone AC house. Fortunately, I didn't need a furnace for down here. Equipment is great in the winter to heat your house! The lab has taken on a life of it's own over time... It started out as a single standard 7-foot 19" rack. Then it grew to two standard racks... Then it changed into three Ortronics Mighty-Mo 19" rack systems (because those are cool). As seen now, it has changed yet again into four separate rack cabinets. The cabinets are a bit pricey, so they aren't all the same vendor. Note to all, even if you find a really good price on Ebay, be aware that you still have to ship them, and they weigh a LOT! (This means, have lots of friends and lots of pizza/beer!) Nov'04 -- Well, things have moved even more! The equipment was beating the AC unit that ran for the basement. So instead of being a three-level, three-zone house, we had to upgrade to being a four-zone house. Go figure. As noted above, I would not recommend this path to anyone unless you have a good amount of business to drive it! All of the equipment here is used for testing and lab purposes, but easily serves as Proof of Concept lab for many consulting clients of mine. The recent change was that the crawlspace area under the kitchen area was excavated out and had a concrete floor poured making an enclosed little room. In addition, a large air handler (AKA Mongo AC Unit) was put into that specific room and a door was installed for access and physical separation! While all a very interesting project, it is a pain to move any equipment that you amass, so definitely plan ahead for this sort of activity!
http://smorris.uber-geek.net/lab.htm

1050 Frieze Magazine | Comment | Conrad Schnitzler
In the early 1960s, Conrad Schnitzler met Joseph Beuys in a bar in Düsseldorf. Beuys was at the start of his legendary run as a professor of ‘monumental sculpture’ at Düsseldorf’s Kunstakademie. Schnitzler was a sailor, who specialized in fixing the engines of merchant ships in nearby ports. Beuys took a liking to Schnitzler, inviting him to be one of his students. Schnitzler enrolled at the Kunstakademie, but dropped out a year or two later, much to Beuys’ dismay. If, as Beuys famously entreated, ‘everybody is an artist’, why did he have to go to school to be one? Schnitzler travelled for a few years, making metal sculptures and performance art. Then he took the metal sculptures he built during his time with Beuys, which he had covered in stark planes of black and white paint, dragged them all to a grassy field, and left them there.
http://www.frieze.com/comment/article/conrad-schnitzler/

1043 Monotribe, MIDI and me
synth When I heard about the monotribe, I had my doubts. Mostly that there’s only one pattern, which is 8 steps long. Well, there are 8 extra steps for the drums, as well as a “flux mode” which records your movements on the ribbon continuously. In that sense, it is limited, and is an instrument made to be played with your hands, rather than be programmed. But as it turned out, this was a design choice, and not a technical limitation. I can easily imagine why. They wanted it to seem as analog and playful as possible. Same thing with MIDI. Officially, the monotribe doesn’t support MIDI. It does however offer a sync pulse output and input. This allows it to be synced to other monotribes, modular synthesizers or even Korg’s own virtual iMS-20/iElectribe, using a special sync app on a second iPhone/Pod/Pad. However, the lack of MIDI is still a slight limitation.
http://blog.gg8.se/wordpress/2011/08/14/monotribe-midi-and-me/

1033 "I'm a technical lead on the Google+ team. Ask me anything."
I helped design and build a lot of the circles model and sharing UI for Google+. I was recruited to Google to work on "getting social right" in early 2010. Prior to that, I was CTO of Plaxo, and also its first employee (since March 2002). I've also spent many years working on open standards for the social web (OpenID, OAuth, Portable Contacts, WebFinger, etc.) Since I work for a big/public company (albeit a pretty cool one), I can't provide specific stats, dates for future features, or details of confidential code/algorithms. But I will do my best to be "refreshingly frank" about everything else. :)
http://anyasq.com/79-im-a-technical-lead-on-the-google+-team%20%20%20%20--

1020 GnomeActivityJournal - GNOME Live!
GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Contents GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Overview Code Getting in touch Use cases Grouping and Filtering Features TODO GUI Sprints Architecture Long term goals Video Mockups And Current Usage Sub Pages See Zeitgeist for information about the Zeitgeist engine used internally by the GNOME Activity Journal. Overview The GNOME Activity Journal is a tool for easily browsing and finding files on your computer. It uses Zeitgeist to get information and metadata on what files/websites/contacts/etc. you worked with. Links: Zeitgeist Website, Zeitgeist on Launchpad, GNOME Activity Journal on Launchpad Code The Zeitgeist code is split into two modules: GNOME Activity Journal (GTK+ interface) Project page: https://launchpad.net/gnome-activity-journal Repository: bzr branch lp:gnome-activity-journal Zeitgeist Engine Project page: https://launchpad.net/zeitgeist Repository: bzr branch lp:zeitgeist Getting in touch Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~gnome-zeitgeist-users IRC: #zeitgeist @ irc.freenode.net, #gnome-zeitgeist @ irc.gimp.org Use cases John turns on his computer to work on his seminar paper. Instead of digging through his hierarchal file system, he simply opens up GNOME Activity Journal and clicks on the top item in the "Recently Used Files" list. When he realizes that he can't remember the name of the website that he was reading for research yesterday, he simply looks at the list of files related to his paper and clicks on the website. More at the Zeitgeist Vision page. Grouping and Filtering Our goal is to group/filter the data by: Type of data Source Time Name Tags Neighbouring Data Comments Location of use (GPS) Features Browse activities Drag and Drop (not for links) Tagging Auto tagging Searching Filtering by Dataproviders/Time/Tags Bookmark Data TODO GUI Sprints Add an actions toolbar to quickly share items by email or instant messaging. (See nautilus-share) Architecture Experiment with Tracker, Soylent, and Empathy. Long term goals Better metadata extraction (see some of the sprints above) Integration with other computers and mobile devices. Video Zeitgeist video GAJ video Mockups And Current Usage Some work was done by the City of Largo in the past which replicated some of the features of the Activity Journal. Possibly some of this work can result in ideas for improving the User Interface. Mockups And Usage. Sub Pages /BolzanoIdeas /CityOfLargo /Ideas
http://live.gnome.org/action/show/GnomeActivityJournal?action=show&redirect=GnomeZeitgeist

992 Troy Hunt: Who’s who of bad password practices – banks, airlines and more
Troy Hunt on observations, musings and conjecture about the world of software and technology Troy Hunt, blog, .NET, Azure, Backup, Bing, Blogger, Career Development, Code Quality, Conference, Database, Design Utopia, DotNetNuke, Enterprise Software Platform, Internet Explorer, iPhone, K2, LinkedIn, Media, NDepend, Online Identity, OWASP, People Management, Personal Development, Product Review, ReSharper, Security, SharePoint, Silverlight, Software Quality, SQL Injection, SQL Server, Subversion, Travel, Twitter, Visual Studio, Windows Mobile, XSS, Ah, passwords. Love ‘em or hate ‘em, they’re a necessary evil of the digital age. The reality is we all end up with an alphabet soup of passwords spread over dozens of various sites and services across the internet. Whilst we might not always practice it, we all know the theory of creating a good password; uniqueness, randomness and length. The more of each, the better. Of course we frequently don’t do this because of all sorts of human factors such as convenience, memory or simple unawareness of the risks. Still, when it’s a case of individuals electing not to create secure passwords, they really only have themselves to blame. But what happens when the website won’t allow you to create a secure password? Or at least when they severely constrain your ability to create long, random, unique passwords? And what about when they don’t allow you to send it between your computer and their server securely? Even worse, what happens when our most “secure” institutions implement lazy password policies? Unfortunately, all of this is pretty rampant practice.
http://www.troyhunt.com/2011/01/whos-who-of-bad-password-practices.html

980 Fake Synths Process Post « Shout Out Out Out Out
For our Coming Home video we needed some burnable synths. Being a handy guy with a skill saw and plumb bob I whipped up three fake keyboards based on the Sequential Prophet 5, The Moog Voyager and a large 5U modular. It nearly destroyed my mind and I ended up basically pulling 3 all-nighters to finish in time. Anyway, the plan was to make them look as authentic as possible and to that end, I think we succeeded. Here are some pics of the process…
http://www.shoutoutoutoutout.com/archives/197

973 zCover X5
iPod, nano, iAUdio, Samsung, YH820, YH925, Sony, Walkman, MN-HD5, network, Tosiba, Gigabeat, Sony PSP, iPod, iPod G4, iPod mini, iPod Shuffle, iRiver, iRiver H10, PalmOne, Tero600, Tero650, Creative, Zen, Creative Zen Micro, Creative Zen PMC, PMC, Camouflage, Candy, original, silicone, silicon, silicone alliance, case, skin, silicone case, silicone skin, protector Headphone & USB Reset hole Mic hole Power Switch Advanced molding technology and contour design in the latest style allows full access to all controls and connectors. Low Profile removable, rotating Belt Clip can be rotated and locked so that you can wear your iAudio vertically or horizontally when clipped to your belt. Crystal clear Hard Screen Protector with Rubber Ring Pad provides the best protection and vision effect, it won't slid around or scratch your device. Applied SA flipper lid concept, integrated subpack port flipper cover can help to keep dust, dirt and liquids out. Removable Belt clip with a soft landing insert disk, which will not scratch your device.S zCover silicone cases are crafted from non-toxic, durable HealthCare grade silicone rubber. It is safe Washable - you can wash zCover silicone case by hand. Make sure it’s dried out before putting your iAudio into it. Dry it in room temperature. Please avoid direct fire and direct bright sunshine.
http://www.zcover.com/zCover_Product_iAudio_Original.htm

953 fonitronik modular synth diy
fonitronik modular synth diy synth, diy, sdiy, modular, cgs, efm, soundlab, fonik, wasp, klee, sequencer, ken, stone, ray, wilson, music from outer space, polivoks, scott, stites, cabinet
http://modular.fonik.de/index.html

894 Sonic State - News (Video Item) WNAMM11: Make Noise PhonoGene, Tape splicer and looper
(Video Item) WNAMM11: Make Noise PhonoGene, Tape splicer and looper Synths, Make Noise, WNAMM11: Make Noise PhonoGene,Tape splicer and looper Tony Rolando from Make Noise shows off his new PhonoGene Tape splicer/ Looper Eurorack module. A mix of sampler, splicer and tape echo in digital form it can dice up your audio sample and give you control over many parameters in real time. Also on show was the new Modumix balanced modulator and the Timbre Mixer a low pass gate with a damper circuit. All should be available Q1 2011
http://www.sonicstate.com/news/2011/01/21/wnamm11-make-noise-phonogene/

890 Make Noise PhonoGene, Tape splicer and looper
(Video Item) WNAMM11: Make Noise PhonoGene, Tape splicer and looper Synths, Make Noise, WNAMM11: Make Noise PhonoGene,Tape splicer and looper Tony Rolando from Make Noise shows off his new PhonoGene Tape splicer/ Looper Eurorack module. A mix of sampler, splicer and tape echo in digital form it can dice up your audio sample and give you control over many parameters in real time. Also on show was the new Modumix balanced modulator and the Timbre Mixer a low pass gate with a damper circuit. All should be available Q1 2011
http://www.sonicstate.com/news/2011/01/21/wnamm11-make-noise-phonogene/

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.
http://jhaible.de/polykorg/jh_polykorg_clone.html

871 Get familiar with HTML5! - Dev.Opera
Dev.Opera article: Get familiar with HTML5! developer,article,html, wsc,html5,web standards curriculum,open web Introduction Most of the web standards curriculum is based on the last stable version of HTML — HTML 4.01. The HTML 4.01 spec was completed in 1999, over 10 years ago as of the time of this writing! But unless you've been hiding under a rock for the last year or so, you'll be well aware that there is a new version of HTML in production — HTML5! So why have we been teaching you HTML 4.01 in spite of this? In this article we'll answer this question, and many more. We'll give you the essential background you need to know on why HTML5 came about, and where it is up to now. We'll advise you on how it can fit into your learning right now, even if you are a novice web designer or developer, and we will look at some of the main features of HTML5, so you can see what it adds to the already powerful HTML language.
http://dev.opera.com/articles/view/get-familiar-with-html5/

865 Evolver.html
Just Beautiful! What an amazing instrument! The DSI Evolver has the signature "old school" timbre down pat as well as being able to provide digital timbres reminiscent of the Waldorf Q. There's certainly a "rougher" side available as well with all the feedback implementation and controled distortion. Being able to make PM type plucked and blown sounds is just icing on the cake. Dave Smith should be commended for a job well done. Just have a look at the Panel Layout to get a taste of what this beauty can dish out - the controls are pretty much laid out in the form of a signal path graphic. Be sure to visit Dave Smith's Website! Evolver Sound Examples There are a lot of demos of the Evolver on the web showcasing the gutsy harsh sounds of this beast so I decided to post demos of some of my own patches as examples of the "softer" more "vintage" side of the Evolver's timbre. I make no apologies for these unpolished recordings - these are merely sound samples ;) Resonant Plucked Pad This pad shows some of the rich resonant nature of the filter. Soft Lead This is a simple analog brass lead patch. FM Pad A fun patch with lots of motion made using my "Audio-rate Filter FM" programming tip below. Warm Pad A nice bland-vanilla pad ^_^ What can I say? I love pads... For more MP3 demos showing the full gamut of sounds the Evolver and Polyevolver are capable of, please visit the excellent website of Stefan Trippler! The Definitive Guide to Evolver This rather in-depth guide to the Evolver goes places and does things a mere manual can't. This labor-of-love was crafted by Anu Kirk and with his kind permission, I am offering this fantastic resource right here in PDF format! A much smaller version (400K) is here but it dosen't have internal hyperlinks. Programming Tips Here's a fun repository of programming tips for the Evolver in all its incarnations. Please email me if you would like to add some. Fingered Wave Sequence Submitted by Dave Bryce. This brilliant technique has to be heard to be believed! Plus, its one of those cool things unique to the Evolver! This particular tip is so full of detailed information that it gets its own page! Audio-rate Filter FM Submitted by James Maier. Use the "Audio Mod" parameter in the Filter section to frequency-modulate the cutoff with the analog oscillator. Add resonance until the filter is just on the edge of oscillation then mod the cutoff with just a little triangle LFO set at a very slow speed. Amazing moving chorusing pad and lead sounds can be made this way. Fatter Bass/Pad Sounds Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the same sound in both channels (detuned saws, for instance). With the filters at the 24dB setting, increasing resonance cuts the passband as on the Moog filters. Set Envelope 3 to minimum attack, maximum decay and release, and sustain to maximum. This "creates" an offset, a continuous "on" signal while the keys are gated. Modulate one filters' resonance up (just one), or of the overall resonance level is high, us it to modulate one filters' resonance to its minimum. You get the resonant character plus the size of the non-resonant filter. Use Tri and Sine waves on that side too. "Warmer" Sounds Submitted by James Maier. The Evolver can make many ultra-bright and buzzy sounds due to its extensive feedback and distortion stages but sometimes people miss the subtler side of the beast. For a warmer sound use little or no distortion, close the filter just a bit and turn off the feedback and delay lines. I've managed to get dead-on Prophet5 timbres this way. Adding "Punch" Submitted by Mike Peake. Set the envelopes to linear, and use a Mod to modulate AmpEnv All by itself (lin through log responses with positive and negative self-modulation). This is of course fun on the filter envelopes as well. More Vintage Character Submitted by Mike Peake. Oscillator Slop, set at 5, doesn't come close to the Moog and other old-timer movement, so add slight (1 or 2) LFO to pitch modulations, with individual LFOs per oscillator, and a touch of LFO to LFO rate modulation. A tad of Envelope 3 to pitch helps as well. Don't miss out on the 12dB filter setting Submitted by Mike Peake. The 24dB setting has much more resonance, but the 12dB setting can sound nice and plucky, and do nice slightly fuzzy pads etc. DSI Evolver Waveshape Charts Below are charts I've assembled of the digital waveforms and their spectra as currently used in the DSI Evolver synthesizers. Originally these waves were unique to the SCI ProphetVS vector synth. I find these waveform/spectra graphics really usefull when programming sounds - maybe you will as well. Pay special attention to the spectra as this info is sometimes much more useful than waveshape in determining actual timbre - even before you hear what the waveform sounds like. These are designed to be downloaded (right-click & "save target as"), and printed at 300dpi on 8.5" x 11" pages - don't resize these images before printing or you will lose useful detail. Use them as a handy refrence. This information was cobbled together from various scattered sources (with very special thanks to Achim Gratz!). Any errors or omissions are my own. ^_^ HAVE FUN!!! Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 As far as the origin of these waves is concerned, one of the original VS engineers, Chris Meyer, said: "The original waves for the VS were created three ways - extracting single-cycles from sampled sounds, using a custom additive synthesis program, and using a program Josh (Josh Jeffe, another VS engineer) slapped together called "Hacker" where you could draw the waveshape. These were fed straight from the computer through the filter and VCA of a Pro-One to figure out what they might sound like in a patch. And by the way, no PPG waveforms appear inside the VS - we had access to them, but in the end our consciences got the better of us. We did steal some waveforms from the Korg DW6000, but only by looking at the harmonic drawings on the front panel and trying to imitate them in our additive synthesis program." Modulation Matrix "Cheat Sheet" This chart shows all the modulation routing available on the Evolver. This same info is available in the manual but this can be printed on a single sheet of paper as a handy refrence! Evolver Wallpaper These I created just for fun and desktop "beautification" ;) 1280 X 1024 1024 X 768 800 X 600
http://www.carbon111.com/evolver.html

812 ED102 - Octave-Volts-Hertz
The ED102 borrows heavily from the Korg MS-02™ although it was developed independently of Korg Inc. Korg and MS-02 are the trademarks of Korg Inc. Among presently available music synthesizers, there are two different types of control system used for controlling devices such as the VCO (voltage controlled oscillator) and VCF (voltage controlled filter). These two systems been: Hertz/Volt (Hz/V) and Octave/Volt (Oct/V). The graph to the left shows the relationship between the VCO oscillator frequency (pitch) and the control voltage (keyboard output voltage). The straight line on the graph is from a synthesizer in which there is a one octave change for every one volt change in the control voltage (Oct/V). In contrast, the curved line on the graph is the control voltage from a synthesizer in which the VCO frequency is proportional to voltage (Hz/V system). To allow these systems to work together you will need a module like this ED102. The built-in, fully adjustable log amp and anti-log amp ensure complete system flexibility and compatibility between any presently voltage controlled synthesiser. The Hz/V system In the Hz/V system, the VCO oscillator frequency is proportional to the control voltage so that, for example, if the frequency of a VCO increases by 100Hz for every volt applied, then applying 1V, 2V and 3V to this VCO would generate 100Hz, 200Hz and 300Hz respectively. The Oct/V system In the Oct/V system the VCO oscillator frequency changes one octave for every one volt change in the control voltage so that, for example, 1V, 2V and 3V to a VCO would generate 200Hz, 400Hz and 800Hz respectively. Features and Functions Log Amp: This changes a Hz/V type keyboard CV (control voltage) output into an OCT/V type of CV. Use the Log Amp to change the control signal from, say, a Korg or Yamaha synthesiser into a signal you can use with another type of synthesizer. Antilog Amp: This changes an OCT/V type of keyboard CV output into a Hz/V type of CV. Use this Antilog Amp when you want to control, say, a Korg synthesiser by means of a unit that uses the OCT/V system.
http://www.elby-designs.com/panther/ed102-octave-volts-hertz/ed102.htm

788 Setting Up Your Digital Camera For HDR Shooting
You’ve probably heard of High Dynamic Range (HDR) Photography, it’s made quite an entrance into the world of digital photography. If you haven’t, the HDR process is accomplished by taking multiple exposures of a high contrast scene (usually a landscape or cityscape), at different levels of brightness, and then combining the best light from each exposure into one image. The end result is a stunning image that very closely resembles how the human eye views a scene. This process of digital manipulation has caused a bit of controversy and debate in the world of photography, especially with images that are “over-cooked.” One thing is for sure though, HDR is here to stay. When done right, this unique and in depth processing technique can produce beautiful works of art that mimic the way we view and remember a landscape or scene. The above image is an example of what HDR processing can produce. This image, taken from the Big Island of Hawaii, would not be possible without HDR processing. It was taken around noon, the harshest light of the day. The first image is the best image my camera could produce given the situation. While still beautiful, there are obvious problems. Get ready, this article is going to show you how to take your digital camera and turn it into an HDR shooting machine!
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/setting-up-your-digital-camera-for-hdr-shooting

767 The 5 types of programmers « Steven Benner's Blog
In my code journeys and programming adventures I’ve encountered many strange foes, and even stranger allies. I’ve identified at least five different kinds of code warriors, some make for wonderful comrades in arms, while others seem to foil my every plan. However they all have their place in the pantheon of software development. Without a healthy mix of these different programming styles you’ll probably find your projects either take too long to complete, are not stable enough or are too perfect for humans to look upon. The duct tape programmer The code may not be pretty, but damnit, it works! This guy is the foundation of your company. When something goes wrong he will fix it fast and in a way that won’t break again. Of course he doesn’t care about how it looks, ease of use, or any of those other trivial concerns, but he will make it happen, without a bunch of talk or time-wasting nonsense. The best way to use this person is to point at a problem and walk away. The OCD perfectionist programmer You want to do what to my code? This guy doesn’t care about your deadlines or budgets, those are insignificant when compared to the art form that is programming. When you do finally receive the finished product you will have no option but submit to the stunning glory and radiant beauty of perfectly formatted, no, perfectly beautiful code, that is so efficient that anything you would want to do to it would do nothing but defame a masterpiece. He is the only one qualified to work on his code. The anti-programming programmer I’m a programmer, damnit. I don’t write code. His world has one simple truth; writing code is bad. If you have to write something then you’re doing it wrong. Someone else has already done the work so just use their code. He will tell you how much faster this development practice is, even though he takes as long or longer than the other programmers. But when you get the project it will only be 20 lines of actual code and will be very easy to read. It may not be very fast, efficient, or forward-compatible, but it will be done with the least effort required. The half-assed programmer What do you want? It works doesn’t it? The guy who couldn’t care less about quality, that’s someone elses job. He accomplishes the tasks that he’s asked to do, quickly. You may not like his work, the other programmers hate it, but management and the clients love it. As much pain as he will cause you in the future, he is single-handedly keeping your deadlines so you can’t scoff at it (no matter how much you want to). The theoretical programmer Well, that’s a possibility, but in practice this might be a better alternative. This guy is more interested the options than what should be done. He will spend 80% of his time staring blankly at his computer thinking up ways to accomplish a task, 15% of his time complaining about unreasonable deadlines, 4% of his time refining the options, and 1% of his time writing code. When you receive the final work it will always be accompanied by the phrase “if I had more time I could have done this the right way”. Where do you fit? Personally, I’d have to classify myself as the perfectionist. So, which type of programmer are you? Or perhaps you know another programming archetype that is missing from my list? Post a comment below and I’ll add it to a new updated list.
http://stevenbenner.com/2010/07/the-5-types-of-programmers/

756 Matmos - Supreme Balloon
The arcs of rising and falling pitches that start this song reminded us of a rainbow, and the title stuck: any resemblance to fluttering symbols of homo-nationalist pride are side effects. People have asked us about the Latin kitsch aspect of the song, and we plead guilty to a great love of the Richard Hayman "The Genuine Electric Latin Love Machine" Moog novelty LP from 1969. Having lived in the Mission District of San Francisco for seven years up until our recent move to Baltimore, we have had enough casual exposure to actual Mexican and Salvadorean music to know that this bears only the faintest relation to the real thing. Keith Fullerton Whitman contributed some tasty squelches and zaps from his Doepfer modular synth to brighten the corners, but not everything on here is that high-tech. Consider the lowly stylophone, a handheld novelty instrument popular with British schoolkids that was immortalized during the rave era in the cheesy techno banger "Stylophonia" by the fabulously named UK crew Two Little Boys. The stylophone that is played on this record was sent to us in the mail by a well-wisher and we thank him for this unexpected present. We are even more grateful to Safety Scissors, who forgave us when M. C. Schmidt broke his MS-20 filter knob by tweaking it too vigorously while recording the "horn" part of this song. It's all been patched up now.
http://www.brainwashed.com/common/htdocs/discog/ole799.php?site=matmos

727 How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect | Apartment Therapy DC
How To Create an Antique Mirror Effect Mclain Wiesand, a Baltimore-based custom furniture company, has made a name for itself by producing handcrafted pieces that capture the feel of real antiques. One of the techniques they use for aging mirror is wonderfully simple and serves as the inspiration for this how to. Creating an antique mirror effect is an inexpensive way to revamp a flea market find, or add a new layer of interest and depth to an ordinary wall mirror. Almost any type of mirror can be aged using this technique, including mirrored plexiglass. Supplies • Mirrored glass or plexiglass. Due to the type of paint applied to the reflective coating, inexpensive, craft-store mirror works wonderfully. • Latex or other gloves for hand protection. • Paint stripper. Most types work fine. For a less toxic product, Citristrip works well. • Plastic putty spreader or putty knife. • Modern Masters Metal Effects Black Patina. This patina solution is essentially an acid that eats at the reflective surface of the mirror. There are probably other products that work similarly, but Modern Masters products work well and can be found online or in most art supply stores or specialty paint stores. • 1” chip brush (or similar brush). • Silver paint of choice. Steps Step 1: (Image 2, above) Wearing gloves, place mirror face down on cardboard or other protected surface in a well-ventilated area. Apply stripper generously to back of mirror and allow to sit for a few hours, or until paint can be easily removed with plastic scraper. It is not necessary for all of the paint to be removed; generally speaking, 80-90% should suffice. When paint has been stripped, wash mirror with soap and water and allow to dry. Step 2: (Images 3 & 4) Place stripped mirror face down on clean cardboard or other protected surface. Dip chip brush in Modern Masters Metal Patina Solution and gradually apply it to the raw reflective surface of the mirror. As mirror tends to age from the edges inward, it is best to apply patina solution in heavier amounts around the edges of the mirror. In a matter of minutes (or less), the patina solution will begin to eat away at the reflective surface. Other application techniques that produce nice effects are spattering and light directional brushing of patina solution. Continue applying solution until desired level of ageing is achieved. Rinse with water to neutralize the reaction and allow to dry. Step 3: (photos 5 & 6) This next step involves reapplying paint to the back of the mirror. The color paint you choose will be visible through the spots created by the patina solution. The dark areas of aged antique mirrors tend to be a dark silver-grey but depending on the silvering technique used, can range from gold to pale silver to black. One method that produced nice results is a combination of dark and light silver paints, applied randomly (per images). Apply paint until the reflective surface is completely covered.
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/how-to/how-to-create-an-antique-mirror-effect-127227

706 Geometry, Surfaces, Curves, Polyhedra
POV-Ray: A Tool for Creating Engaging Visualisation of Geometry Various notes on polygons and meshes Includes Surface (polygon) simplification, Clipping a polygonal facet with an arbitrary plane, Surface Relaxation and Smoothing of polygonal data, Mesh crumpling, splitting polygons, two sided facets, polygon types. Philosophy is written in this grand book - I mean universe - which stands continuously open to our gaze, but which cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language in which it is written. It is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles and other geometric figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it; without these, one is wandering about in a dark labyrinth. Galileo (1623) Distance between a point, a line and a plane The intersection of a line with another line (2D) The closest line between two lines (3D) The intersection of a line with a plane Mathematics describing a plane The intersection of two planes The intersection of three planes Polygon area and centroid calculation Inside / outside polygon test Reflection of a ray Direction Cosines Eulers number and closed surfaces Determining whether a line segment intersects a facet Coordinate transformations on the plane (2D) Cartesian, Cylindrical, and Spherical Euler angles and coordinate transformations Converting between left and right coordinate systems Clipping a line with a polygon Clockwise test for polygons in 2D Test for concave/convex polygon in 2D Area of (planar) polygons in 3D Spheres, equations and terminology The intersection of a line and a sphere (or a circle) Equation of the circle through 3 points Equation of the sphere through 4 points Intersecting area of circles on a plane Rotation of a point about an arbitrary axis Creating a plane/disk perpendicular to a line segment Intersection of two circles on the plane Circumference of an ellipse Intersection of two spheres Distributing Points on a Sphere Quadric equations in x and y of degree 2 Fowler angles: Comparing angles without trigonometry Contouring Algorithm Description of an efficient contouring algorithm as it appeared in Byte magazine. (Byte Magazine, 1987) and a more general approach for arbitrary contour planes and polygonal meshes. Spherical projections Methods for mapping points on a spherical surface onto a plane, stereographic and cylindrical (including Mercator) projections. Includes Aitoff map projection: Conversion to/from longitude/latitude (spherical map) Projection types Classification of projections from 3D to 2D and specific examples of oblique projections. A triangle was an improvement to the square wheel. It eliminated one bump. BC comics Planar (stretching) distortion in the plane Including Anamorphic projections and Mappings in the Complex Plane (Otherwise known as Conformal maps) Polygonising a scalar field Otherwise known as marching cubes and marching tetrahedrons. HyperSpace (Historic) A Macintosh 4 dimensional geometry viewer and manual.
http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/geometry/

679 Trevor Marshall's ETI3600, ETI4600 International Music Synthesisers and Maplin 3800 and Maplin 5600s Stereo Synthesisers
Many years ago the Australian magazine "Electronics Today International" published my designs for two partly digital, mostly analog, Electronic Music Synthesisers. the ETI 3600 and ETI 4600. Both were made available as kits of components Barry Wilkinson at ETI was responsible for the final packaging and kitting coordination. Maplin Electronics Ltd.(in the UK) subsequently picked up the designs, which they marketed as as the Maplin models 3800 and 5600s Electronic Music Synthesisers At the time I held two Australian provisional patents for the technologies I used in the Synthesiser designs. One related to the method for generating sawtooth waveforms, the other was for the method of using commutated resistors in voltage controlled filters. I never made any money out of the designs, or the patents, which have long ago been allowed to lapse. But it was fun! The original constructional articles for the ETI 3600/4600 can be found in these PDFs: October 1973, December 1973, January 1974, Feb 1974, March 1974, April 1974, July 1974, March 1975, April 1975, May 1975, August 1975 Although the earliest (4004) microprocessors were available at that time, it was not until the late-70's that I first started programming fully digital (Signetics 2650 based) Microcomputer systems. Consequently my early digital designs were hardware, and not firmware, based. Of course, these days, everything in my hardware and firmware is based on software designs - even the interconnections are controlled by the software in the EPLDs and PALs, instead of by wires. So many things have changed over the years.... Here is a mug shot of the Maplin 3800:
http://www.trevormarshall.com/eti.htm

660 What's Next: fully ergonomic laptops? | VentureBeat
When the first laptops were created around 1979 — laptops like the Grid Compass — ergonomics was not exactly a core concern. The screens were only 2-4 inches, RAM was a few hundred kilobytes, and batteries were huge. The Osbourne 1 weighed 24 pounds, perhaps making it the first portable computer and dumbbell. Hooray for convergence! Modern clamshell and tablet designs have solved many of these issues: screen sizes exceed 17”, RAM can be several gigabytes, and weight can be less than three pounds, deservedly earning names like the Air. What hasn’t been solved is ergonomics, and that’s a costly problem. The U.S. Department of Labor reported 650,000 cases of work-related muscular disorders, costing businesses an estimated $20 billion in medical claims and lost productivity. An ergonomically ideal computer setup aligns the top of the screen with our eye level, lets our arms and wrists straighten, and allows our shoulders to relax. Because laptop screens are attached to their keyboards, they require a damaging trade-off: place the laptop at eye level and hunch our shoulders, or place the keyboard at arm level and bend our neck. Most laptop keyboards are also rectangles, requiring wrist twisting. The result is chronic neck, shoulder, and wrist pain, and with laptop use increasing, this problem will only get worse.
http://venturebeat.com/2009/08/14/whats-next-fully-ergonomic-laptops/

651 50 Fresh and Inspiring Dark Web Designs | Inspiration
Back in February we showcased a list of 50 Inspiring Dark Web Designs to show that dark colors are also a really good option when comes to web design. The list was so inspiring and commented that we decided to do a new one with another 50 inspiring dark web designs. color,dark,inspiration,web design
http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/50-fresh-and-inspiring-dark-web-designs/

616 Alphabet Soup modular synth
The STS Serge Modular can be a daunting system at first blush, especially for those who come from an "East Coast" modular synth background. My first synthesizers were Moog analogs and my first Analog Modular Synth was an Arrick "Dotcom" system - so I started out with East Coast paradigms that I had to "unlearn" in order to use my Serge Modular to the fullest. For those of you coming from a similar background or those just discovering the Serge Modular for the first time, these "Alphabet Soup" pages are dedicated to you! The Serge Modular is intuitive and fun to use - especially when you realize the main difference between a Serge Modular and most others has to do with the size of the building blocks, where a Moog or similar modular will have monolithic building blocks like ADSRs and Oscillators, the Serge can be more "low-level" in that you can build ADSRs and oscillators from Serge modules or, more properly, Function Blocks. These Function Blocks usually come bearing arcane names that have been shortened to an "Alphabet Soup" conglomeration of acronyms. In this series of articles, I'll be talking about some of the ways to approach these Function Blocks to create much more useful, surprising, complex or just simply fun synthesis features. The first function block we're going to look at is the "DSG", otherwise known as the Dual Universal Slope Generator. This mild-mannered module is in some ways the most powerful one in the entire Serge catalog because it can become so many different things depending on where you place the patch cords...as you'll soon see.
http://www.carbon111.com/alphabet1.html

602 Free Music Friday – Circuit Ben « GetLoFi – Circuit Bending Synth DIY
Circuit Ben is Killing Music Album now is free to download. Enjoy great catchy tunes and top notch production. This is a very good example melodic composition with circuit bent toys. Circuit_Ben_is_Killing_Music Download Background Info: Bent Stuff used: Casio sk1, Casio sk5, Casio sk100, Casio pt-20, Casio ks-03, Yamaha pss-11, Yamaha pss460, Hing Hon EK-001, Cheburashka!, Jim Bowen/Al Pacino dub siren, Super ultra mega, Fun-box (orgasm toy), Toy Koran (Quran), Cheap Chinese phone toys, Kung Fu toy, Captain Scarlet’s car, “Pound Shop” keyboard (cost £1 new.), Dragonball Z keyrings, Barbie keyboard, Fisher-price tape recorder (now dirty,dirty guitar amp.), George W Bush and probably about fifty circuits with a soldered output that were bent/killed while recording – auto-destruct! Non Bent Stuff: Mini Kaoss pad, Gameboy with Nanoloop, Melodica, 5-litre oil can guitar, Acoustic bass, Casio kx-101, Stylophone, Voice Ben Says that in general songs are as vague as possible and about nothing – that’s the story he is sticking to The Lyrics for “Allen” are from “Cocaine Blues” by Allen Ginsberg. All this was written and performed by Circuit Ben and produced by Lee Gregory – www.myspace.com/randomleeaudio
http://www.getlofi.com/?p=1687

551 The Top Idea in Your Mind
I realized recently that what one thinks about in the shower in the morning is more important than I'd thought. I knew it was a good time to have ideas. Now I'd go further: now I'd say it's hard to do a really good job on anything you don't think about in the shower. Everyone who's worked on difficult problems is probably familiar with the phenomenon of working hard to figure something out, failing, and then suddenly seeing the answer a bit later while doing something else. There's a kind of thinking you do without trying to. I'm increasingly convinced this type of thinking is not merely helpful in solving hard problems, but necessary. The tricky part is, you can only control it indirectly. [1] I think most people have one top idea in their mind at any given time. That's the idea their thoughts will drift toward when they're allowed to drift freely. And this idea will thus tend to get all the benefit of that type of thinking, while others are starved of it. Which means it's a disaster to let the wrong idea become the top one in your mind. What made this clear to me was having an idea I didn't want as the top one in my mind for two long stretches.
http://www.paulgraham.com/top.html

547 Din Sync: How to modify a Korg Monotron
So here's how to modify Korg's new Monotron analog ribbon synthesizer. Perhaps this is the first document of Monotron mods in Europe since it still hasn't been released here. It's actually a very easy machine to modify because for whatever reason Korg decided to label all the interesting points on the bottom side of the PCB. This may well have been for testing units at the factory/service centers. Perhaps though it could have been that the designers anticipated this little machine would be hacked, much like the Gakken which pretty obviously inspired this piece. Incidentally in the magazine that comes with the Gakken there's a picture of them showing it to Korg, that was in 2008, go figure.
http://www.dinsync.info/2010/06/how-to-modify-korg-monotron.html

523 Yamaha CS-01 Resonance Mod
Just to get this up here. I hope to make this clearer soon... This shows how you can modify the Yamaha CS-01 Mk1 to: 1) have variable resonance control, by hijacking the Breath Control VCF potentiometer a) remove the 10k resistor near the VCF chip. b) cut the traces (or lift the pins) of the Breath Control VCF pot that connect it to GND and the Breath Control jack. I lifted the pins just to avoid cutting PCB traces c) remove the 39k resistor tied to the wiper of the VCF pot. d) solder wires from one side of the pot and the pot wiper and run these wires over to the holes that used to contain the 10k resistor near the VCF chip e) I'd suggest adjusting the resonance trimmer that's near the VCF chip to make your new Resonance control self-oscillate near the end of the rotation. why? because this filter gets out of control in a very loud and dramatic way. I don't think this VCF chip was designed for stable self-oscillation - that may explain why, in the CS-01 Mk2, when they gave you analog control of the resonance, they used a different 24dB VCF chip. 2) have variable VCA "drone" by hijacking the Breath Control VCA potentiometer. a) remove the 1k resistor that grounds usually-closed terminal of the breath control jack to GND b) solder a 47k resistor from the ungrounded, non-wiper terminal of the pot to -9V. c) when the VCA drone pot is now fully on, you'll always get a DCO-VCF signal running to the power amp. this mod keeps the VCA only partially open, and you can still superimpose the EG over the drone. I did this because I don't have a spec sheet on the VCA chip and I didn't want to risk having the EG slamming the VCA while the drone was going full on (basically, I don't know the max CV that the VCA chip can tolerate). so if you just use the drone, you'll have to increase the volume at the power amp. But now the front-panel VCA slider actually becomes useful, since if you don't want the EG to affect the drone, just turn that down to nothing! Sorry I don't have actual pics of the mod up! Perhaps someday soon...
http://home.earthlink.net/~kerrybradley/id11.html

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality…” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

464 Ksplice » Attack of the Cosmic Rays! - System administration and software blog
It’s a well-documented fact that RAM in modern computers is susceptible to occasional random bit flips due to various sources of noise, most commonly high-energy cosmic rays. By some estimates, you can even expect error rates as high as one error per 4GB of RAM per day! Many servers these days have ECC RAM, which uses extra bits to store error-correcting codes that let them correct most bit errors, but ECC RAM is still fairly rare in desktops, and unheard-of in laptops. For me, bitflips due to cosmic rays are one of those problems I always assumed happen to “other people”. I also assumed that even if I saw random cosmic-ray bitflips, my computer would probably just crash, and I’d never really be able to tell the difference from some random kernel bug. A few weeks ago, though, I encountered some bizarre behavior on my desktop, that honestly just didn’t make sense. I spent about half an hour digging to discover what had gone wrong, and eventually determined, conclusively, that my problem was a single undetected flipped bit in RAM. I can’t prove whether the problem was due to cosmic rays, bad RAM, or something else, but in any case, I hope you find this story interesting and informative.
http://blog.ksplice.com/2010/06/attack-of-the-cosmic-rays/

441 How To Become a Millionaire In Three Years | Jason L. Baptiste
/* This was originally a comment made in response to a hacker news thread titled:  Ask HN: How to become a millionaire in 3 years? .  The comment has over must reads,startups
http://jasonlbaptiste.com/startups/how-to-become-a-millionaire-in-three-years/

440 A List Apart: Articles: Taking Advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 with Modernizr
Ten years ago, only the most cutting-edge web designers used CSS for layouts and styling. Browser support for CSS layouts was slim and buggy, so these people advocated for web standards adherence, while creating hacks that made CSS layouts work in all browsers. One hack that became widely used was browser sniffing: Detecting which browser and version the user had by looking at the navigator.userAgent property in JavaScript. Browser sniffing allowed for quick and easy code forking, allowing developers to target different browsers with different instructions. Today, CSS-based layouts are commonplace and every browser has pretty solid support for them. But now we have CSS3 and HTML5, and the situation is repeating itself—different browsers demonstrate varying levels of support for these new technologies. We’ve smartened up, however, and no longer employ CSS hacks nor use browser sniffing—an unreliable, poor practice. We’ve also convinced more and more clients that websites don’t need to look exactly the same in every browser. So how do we deal with this new but familiar problem? Simple: We use feature detection, which means that we do not ask the browser “who are you?” and make unreliable assumptions from there on. Instead we ask the browser, “can you do this and that?” It’s a simple way to test browser capabilities, but doing all these tests manually all the time gets tiresome. To solve that problem (and others), you can use Modernizr.
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/taking-advantage-of-html5-and-css3-with-modernizr/

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front … if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant Donnés, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

395 The Ultimate CSS3 Toolbox: 50+ Resources, Tutorials and Articles | CreativeFan
The ultimate CSS3 toolbox, with introductory articles, then tutorials, then see what's possible with inspiration and finally some more resources. css3, css, resources, tutorials, tips, tricks, techniques, css3 tips, css3 tutorials, css3 tutorial, css3 tip, css techniques, css3 techniques Last week, I published a massive roundup of HTML5 resources, articles, tips and techniques, and it was a big hit within the design and development community. Since HTML5 is only of the upgrades that is being rolled out, I thought it would be appropriate and helpful to assemble a set of CSS3 resources. This post serves as the ultimate CSS3 toolbox. You’ll start with a few introductory articles, then jump right in with tutorials, then see what’s possible with inspiration and finally some more resources. If you have any resources to add to the list, please, let us know in the comments!
http://creativefan.com/the-ultimate-css3-toolbox-50-resources-tutorials-and-articles/

370 Welcome, WebM <video>
In February 2007, 1177 days ago to be exact, Opera proposed the <video> element and we published a manifesto for video on the Web. When proposing <video>, we knew there would be two challenges. The first was easy: to get consensus around the syntax. We wanted <video> to be as easy to use as <img>. The second was harder: to find an open and freely-usable high quality video format. The web has always been open and freely-usable; Tim didn’t patent HTML, I didn’t patent CSS and Brendan didn’t patent JavaScript. The big news today is that WebM will join the list of open and freely usable Web formats, and video will finally become a first-class citizen of the Web. This is a big deal, and the day will be remembered in the history of the Web. At Opera, we’re proud to add support for WebM into a Labs build — you can download this build for:
http://labs.opera.com/news/2010/05/19/

369 How to Install Mac OS X on a PC (Without Using a Mac)
There are many great tutorials on the web for using a Mac to install Mac OS X Snow Leopard on a PC. Unfortunately, you may be unable to follow such tutorials if you do not readily have access to a Mac to perform the preparation necessary for the installation. Great progress has been made in hacking PCs to run OS X, and it is now possible to install Mac OS X without a Mac. Thanks to some great tools put together by some brilliant hackers, it is also much easier and does not involve nearly as much time and effort as was once required.
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/how-to-install-mac-os-x-on-a-pc-without-using-a-mac/

340 7-things-to-stop-doing-now-on-facebook: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
Using a Weak Password Avoid simple names or words you can find in a dictionary, even with numbers tacked on the end. Instead, mix upper- and lower-case letters, numbers, and symbols. A password should have at least eight characters. One good technique is to insert numbers or symbols in the middle of a word, such as this variant on the word "houses": hO27usEs! Leaving Your Full Birth Date in Your Profile More from ConsumerReports.org: • Millions of Users Exposing Personal Information • Tested: 119 Laptops, Desktops, Netbooks and iPad • Electronics Reviews It's an ideal target for identity thieves, who could use it to obtain more information about you and potentially gain access to your bank or credit card account. If you've already entered a birth date, go to your profile page and click on the Info tab, then on Edit Information. Under the Basic Information section, choose to show only the month and day or no birthday at all. Overlooking Useful Privacy Controls For almost everything in your Facebook profile, you can limit access to only your friends, friends of friends, or yourself. Restrict access to photos, birth date, religious views, and family information, among other things. You can give only certain people or groups access to items such as photos, or block particular people from seeing them. Consider leaving out contact info, such as phone number and address, since you probably don't want anyone to have access to that information anyway. Popular Stories on Yahoo!: • 20 Best Cities to Ride Out the Recession • Wealth Ranking: You're Richer Than You Think • 7 Expenses You Can Ditch in Retirement More from Yahoo! Finance Posting Your Child's Name in a Caption Don't use a child's name in photo tags or captions. If someone else does, delete it by clicking on Remove Tag. If your child isn't on Facebook and someone includes his or her name in a caption, ask that person to remove the name. Mentioning That You'll Be Away From Home That's like putting a "no one's home" sign on your door. Wait until you get home to tell everyone how awesome your vacation was and be vague about the date of any trip. Letting Search Engines Find You To help prevent strangers from accessing your page, go to the Search section of Facebook's privacy controls and select Only Friends for Facebook search results. Be sure the box for public search results isn't checked. Permitting Youngsters to Use Facebook Unsupervised Facebook limits its members to ages 13 and over, but children younger than that do use it. If you have a young child or teenager on Facebook, the best way to provide oversight is to become one of their online friends. Use your e-mail address as the contact for their account so that you receive their notifications and monitor their activities. "What they think is nothing can actually be pretty serious," says Charles Pavelites, a supervisory special agent at the Internet Crime Complaint Center. For example, a child who posts the comment "Mom will be home soon, I need to do the dishes" every day at the same time is revealing too much about the parents' regular comings and goings.
http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home/article/109538/7-things-to-stop-doing-now-on-facebook

307 SEO Tips : 11 Tips To Improve Your Site Ranking In Bing Search Engine
Bing (formerly Live Search, Windows Live Search, and MSN Search) is the current web search engine from Microsoft. Bing was unveiled by Microsoft CEO Steve seo tips for bing search engine, how to get good ranking in search engine, bing seo tips , tips on bing seo,microsoft,seo,internet tips
http://savedelete.com/seo-tips-11-tips-to-improve-your-site-ranking-in-bing-search-engine.html

303 View topic - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D
Instruments - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:14 pm Post subject: Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D I've found this site: http://homepage.mac.com/s...ds_cs15mod.html I've made mod in my CS30 - faster LFO speed... anyway? I know circuit in cs30 is diffrent. anyway i was wonderin howto get 24db lopass? JarreYuri - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:05 pm I don't know... yet. But I just wanted to say that I would soooo much want to have that synth You have. Congratulations! Which version do You have? radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:22 pm I had 3 versions: - Yamaha CS30L - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 6 or 8 steps - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 1 to 8 steps sold first two
http://216.70.103.199/forum/printview.php?t=4294&start=0&sid=120d9a0ab733b5531ff4e0e0473aca14

300 YAMAHA CS-30 SYNTHESIZER
This page is dedicated to the Yamaha CS-30, the monophonic top-of-the-line of Yamahas CS-series synthesizers. This synthesizer series comprised of the CS-5, CS-10, CS-15 and the CS-30. These were all monophonic. The polyphonic series comprised of the CS-50, CS-60 and the classic CS-80, Later came the CS-30M and CS-40 monophonics as well as the CS-70 polyphonic with some patch saving capabilities and different design. All the units of this series of vintage synthesizers are very nice and collectable, but the CS-30 was the largest and most flexible of the monophonic series. If Yamaha had ever decided to build a large modular system they could have done so using some of the designs of the CS-series. In this page I will go through the features of the CS-30, for anyone interested.
http://212.242.106.33/~etcetera/public/instruments/CS-30/cs30page.htm

298 The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook
Facebook is a great service. I have a profile, and so does nearly everyone I know under the age of 60. However, Facebook hasn't always managed its users' data well. In the beginning, it restricted the visibility of a user's personal information to just their friends and their "network" (college or school). Over the past couple of years, the default privacy settings for a Facebook user's personal information have become more and more permissive. They've also changed how your personal information is classified several times, sometimes in a manner that has been confusing for their users. This has largely been part of Facebook's effort to correlate, publish, and monetize their social graph: a massive database of entities and links that covers everything from where you live to the movies you like and the people you trust. This blog post by Kurt Opsahl at the the EFF gives a brief timeline of Facebook's Terms of Service changes through April of 2010. It's a great overview, but I was a little disappointed it wasn't an actual timeline: hence my initial inspiration for this infographic.
http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/

284 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Tip
Alesis Andromeda A6 Tip If you own an Andromeda, give this a try. Via this gearslutz thread where you'll find additional details, via mister bunty on AH: "For those that asked, here's the thread on gearslutz that explains the waveshaping that happens above level 30. I know it sounds crazy, but if you keep the levels pre-mix below 30 total (yes, total!) and then the filter/ringmod/postmix levels around 70 at sum, you'll hear a whole new definition. I tried it on a crappy set of headphones and was amazed. Then, I listened through my bluesky monitors and a set of NS-10s, and couldn't believe the detail I had been missing. For me, at least, the juice and "vintage-ness" of the Andy was discovered." http://www.gearslutz.com/board/electronic-music-instruments-electronic-music-production/473535-what-does-andromeda-do-better-6.html#post5206610
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/05/alesis-andromeda-a6-tip.html

273 How to be a Programmer: A Short, Comprehensive, and Personal Summary
How to be a Programmer: A Short, Comprehensive, and Personal Summary Robert L Read Copyright 2002, 2003 Robert L. Read Copyright Copyright 2002, 2003 by Robert L. Read. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with one Invariant Section being ‘History (As of February, 2003)’, no Front-Cover Texts, and one Back-Cover Text: ‘The original version of this document was written by Robert L. Read without renumeration and dedicated to the programmers of Hire.com.’ A copy of the license is included in the section entitled ‘GNU Free Documentation License’. 2002
http://samizdat.mines.edu/howto/HowToBeAProgrammer.html

263 Facebook's Eroding Privacy Policy: A Timeline | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Since its incorporation just over five years ago, Facebook has undergone a remarkable transformation. When it started, it was a private space for communication with a group of your choice. Soon, it transformed into a platform where much of your infor...
http://w2.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/facebook-timeline/

256 Geocities-izer - Make Any Webpage Look Like It Was Made By A 13 Year-Old In 1996
Make Any Webpage Look Like It Was Made By A 13 Year-Old In 1996. Geocities, web design, animated gifs, marquee tag, blink tag, midi music
http://wonder-tonic.com/geocitiesizer/

235 MATRIXSYNTH: Alesis Andromeda A6 Aurora Mod
This was a custom mod. I originally put a post up in August of 05 here. Anyone know the website where more info on this mod is hosted? I accidentally lost the link when mucking around with Blogger's settings a while back. This image via Photobucket Update: I found the original site but it is down. Some info and additional shots pulled from the Internet Archive Way Back Machine. You can find some thumbnails there, but most give you a 404 if you click on them for the larger shot. I pulled the large pics below before they are gone forever. "Alesis made Synthesis History when they released their Alesis Andromeda A6, an analog polysynth bred with new technology and classic analog sound! Sixteen awesome voices with two types of filters, a vast modulation system, and enough bells and whistles to make the Andromeda A6 THE most highly featured analog polysynth in existence. If it only had a sloped panel... SPECS: * Take one Andromeda, lightly used (but out of warranty - very important!) * Add one black on blue BETA Panel - because the pre-production beta panels were lacking the Pre- and Post-Filter Mix VIEW buttons, either the buttoncaps must be pulled off of the switches on the PCBs OR two holes need to be carefully drilled through the panel to accomodate. I drilled the holes after measuring about fifteen times each. * Tilt that panel at approx. the same slope as the Korg MS-20. Requires the extending of a couple of ribbon cables inside, and some pop-rivetted braces. Not too hard. * Custom wood endcheeks of nice Oak, plus a wood accent over the keyboard. I chose to go with thick, high quality wood to make Aurora more of a beast. * Replace all green LEDs with red high-intensity ones. This also required changing some resistor values to increase the brightness. * Replace the LCD with a Hantronix Blue-on-White display. Also, some resistor changes are needed. * Have a very agreeable Alesis burn a custom Boot EPROM with the custom-designed bootup screen below. * Build a custom top panel, complete with several additional controls (two joysticks, several switches and knobs) as well as a full 16-channel mixer with level and pan per channel, one for each of the 16 individual outs on the Andromeda. * Add lots of careful, hard work and time, and PRESTO - you have the Aurora A6! The Name: I went with Aurora for a couple of reasons. 1. Alliteration - AurorA - AndromedA - get it? 2. There is some legend/lore as to how the Alesis Andromeda got its name. Could be related to the Greek mythos. Could be related to the Andromeda galaxy. Could be darts thrown at dictionary pages :-) In any case, Aurora fits with the mythology bent because in Roman mythology, Aurora was the goddess of the dawn (Andromeda was rescued and married by Perseus in Greek mythos). Aurora also fits the 'celestial' thing as well, as the Aurora Borealis. Either way, it kept with what might have perhaps been Alesis' reasons for naming the Andromeda. 3. I just liked it. 4. The A6 is kept because this fits with Alesis' naming convention (QS8 = 81-key QuadraSynth, A6 = 61-key Analog). There is some rumor that A6 was a play on ASICs, the custom chips within Andromeda, but I'm assured this is just rumor :-) "
http://matrixsynth.blogspot.com/2010/01/alesis-andromeda-aurora.html

223 Definitive PHP security checklist | sk89q
There was a recent question about a PHP security checklist on a forum I frequent, and I've decided to write my own comprehensive checklist to fill the void. php,security
http://www.sk89q.com/2009/08/definitive-php-security-checklist/

211 30 Old PC Ads That Will Blow Your Processor | Information Technology Schools
Many people today either are too young to have ever seen some early pc’s or have forgotten what they looked like and how much they cost. Today we complain about the cost of a laptop running 2Ghz with 4GB ram for a cost of $ 400.00, however it wasn’t that long ago that laptops and pc’s were priced quite a bit higher. Here are 30 Old PC ads that will make you laugh and possibly appreciate what you have today.
http://www.informationtechnologyschools.org/blog/2010/30-old-pc-ads-that-will-blow-your-processor/

202 How Accessible is Your Website? 8 Tools to Analyze Your Website’s Level of Accessibility | Spyre Studios
Designing a website that's as much successful as it is effective takes time, skills, and a lot of testing. Normally, when we're talking about web design and we hear the word testing, the first thing that comes to mind is usability, and that's fine, but when was the last time you sat down to analyze the level of accessibility of your website? Testing on other aspects of your website are important, however, a lot of us seem to neglect our websites accessibility. This can ultimately lead to the loss of a wide range of users and poor elements of design. But not to fear, below we've compiled a set of tools that will help you combat poor accessibility. Every tool is free to use and has been chosen because it's easy to use and offers quality testing. accessibility,tools
http://spyrestudios.com/website-accessibility-tools/

135 all - dj accessories - Turntablelab.com
we started the Lab in 1998, our first year out of college. Turntable Lab was established in 1998 by Anthony Cattarina, Jasper Goggins, and Peter Hahn. The trio formed the idea for the Lab based on numerous negative experiences at stores that sold dj equipment: both big musical instrument chains and shady Canal Street stereo stores. Turned off by haggling, uninformed salesmen, and questionable product, Turntable Lab built its business on fair pricing, informed reviews, and a well researched selection of “Lab approved” items. Most of the Lab's employees are working djs / producers / musicians, which helps to ensure this high standard. The business model was an immediate success, establishing rapid growth and a dedicated customer base. Turntable Lab soon applied their business model to other areas including recorded music, production equipment, clothing, and books. Each expansion has been met with success, and today Turntable Lab is a recognized tastemaker in all those areas. To bring the Turntable Lab experience directly to consumers, Turntable Lab opened its first retail location in 2001. In December of 2005, Turntable opened its flagship store in Hollywood, California. Currently the Turntable Lab headquarters is located in Brooklyn, New York.
http://www.turntablelab.com/dj_equipment/42/2204/

128 HybridReverb
HybridReverb2 is a convolution-based reverberation effect which combines the superior sound quality of a convolution reverb with the tuning capability of a feedback delay network. The sound quality of a convolution reverb depends on the quality of the used room impulse responses. HybridReverb2 comes with a set of room impulse responses which were synthesized with tinyAVE, an auralization software which was developed at the Institute of Communication Acoustics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Borß and Martin, 2009; Borß, 2009a). These room impulse responses are designed for a speaker setup with two front and two rear speakers (Borß, 2009b). For a full surround sound effect, you will need two plugins, one plugin which uses a "front" preset for the front channels and a second plugin which uses the corresponding "rear" preset for the rear channels.
http://www2.ika.rub.de/HybridReverb2/#download

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