100SILEX, de 0 100 s: weeks
464 Ksplice » Attack of the Cosmic Rays! - System administration and software blog
It’s a well-documented fact that RAM in modern computers is susceptible to occasional random bit flips due to various sources of noise, most commonly high-energy cosmic rays. By some estimates, you can even expect error rates as high as one error per 4GB of RAM per day! Many servers these days have ECC RAM, which uses extra bits to store error-correcting codes that let them correct most bit errors, but ECC RAM is still fairly rare in desktops, and unheard-of in laptops. For me, bitflips due to cosmic rays are one of those problems I always assumed happen to “other people”. I also assumed that even if I saw random cosmic-ray bitflips, my computer would probably just crash, and I’d never really be able to tell the difference from some random kernel bug. A few weeks ago, though, I encountered some bizarre behavior on my desktop, that honestly just didn’t make sense. I spent about half an hour digging to discover what had gone wrong, and eventually determined, conclusively, that my problem was a single undetected flipped bit in RAM. I can’t prove whether the problem was due to cosmic rays, bad RAM, or something else, but in any case, I hope you find this story interesting and informative.
http://blog.ksplice.com/2010/06/attack-of-the-cosmic-rays/

433 The Beauty Of Typography: Writing Systems And Calligraphy, Part 2 - Smashing Magazine
The beauty of writing systems is that each has something unique from which to draw inspiration. Two weeks ago, in the first part of this article, we covered Arabic web design, magazine, html, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/22/the-beauty-of-typography-writing-systems-and-calligraphy-part-2/

423 MACBETH STUDIO SYSTEMS
Welcome to MacBeth Synthesizers! LATEST NEWS: 20/07/09 please scroll down for infoOver the last year and half or so, more products have been developed. Work has gone into the design of a new modular synthesizer system shared by two formats- the 3U format and the 5U format. The designs are relatively new but still retain the inherant qualities of the M3X, M5 and M5N synthesizers. The system is called the X-Series Modular Synthesizer after the popular M3X and its protégé keyboard synthesizer the X-Factor. This fully analogue keyboard is still under serious development and there will be more information to follow on that one. As a refreshing change from making the large scale semi modular M5 and M5N, I am now delving into the production of smaller, free for all systems that will probably grow large! I'm taking into it all my experience of designing both large and small analogue synthesizers as well as a few new ideas too. Please take the time to look around this website. In each catagory there is product information, sounds, tracks and links to other related media on the internet. Currently the 3U X-Series Dual Oscillator and 'Backend' Filter Combo are in production. I expect delivery of the Dual Oscillator within the next two weeks- shortly after that the 'Backend' Filter Combo will roll out of production. Please contact any of the Distributers listed to get your modules. I intend to produce a short run of the 5U modules soon, so once again- stay tuned for that... ...anyway! I have uploaded quite a few demo sounds on here- maybe not to everyones taste- but at least they make you think of what these modules could do in the right hands, i.e. you! - after all- I'm an engineer, not a muscian as such!...Well you decide! All MacBeth Products are built to exacting standards- from materials selection to the physical build. The PCBs and Sheet Metalwork are fabricated by Zot Engineering from Musselburgh, Scotland http://www.zot.co.uk and final assembly is performed by Diatron Assembly Systems from Norwich, England http://www.diatron.co.uk Both companies also manufacture equipment for the medical, military and aerospace sectors of industrial engineering
http://www.macbethstudiosystems.com/

364 What every programmer should know about memory, Part 1 [LWN.net]
Editor's introduction: Ulrich Drepper recently approached us asking if we would be interested in publishing a lengthy document he had written on how memory and software interact. We did not have to look at the text for long to realize that it would be of interest to many LWN readers. Memory usage is often the determining factor in how software performs, but good information on how to avoid memory bottlenecks is hard to find. This series of articles should change that situation. The original document prints out at over 100 pages. We will be splitting it into about seven segments, each run 1-2 weeks after its predecessor. Once the entire series is out, Ulrich will be releasing the full text. Reformatting the text from the original LaTeX has been a bit of a challenge, but the results, hopefully, will be good. For ease of online reading, Ulrich's footnotes have been placed {inline in the text}. Hyperlinked cross-references (and [bibliography references]) will not be possible until the full series is published. Many thanks to Ulrich for allowing LWN to publish this material; we hope that it will lead to more memory-efficient software across our systems in the near future.
https://lwn.net/Articles/250967/

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