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1522 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader
secure tt-rss, tt-rss security 5 Simple steps to secure TT-RSS reader July 27, 2015 by Anand Leave a Comment secure-tt-rss-ft Share: share htpcBeginner We recently presented Tiny Tiny RSS to you as a great alternative to Google reader, which is one more way you can extend the functionality of your home server or your hosting space. Hopefully, you already exported your data from Google Reader. In this post, we will show you how to secure TT-RSS reader to prevent unauthorized access. Tiny Tiny RSS is an open source web-based news feed (RSS/Atom) reader and aggregator, designed to allow you to read news from any location, while feeling as close to a real desktop application as possible. As we previously explained, it makes an ideal candidate to replace Google Reader. While there are services like Feedly and Newsblur grabbing the crowd Google Reader, which some of you may prefer, there are a group of people who would like to run a RSS reader on their own server and keep things private. Assuming that you have already installed Tiny Tiny RSS on your alternative to Google reader or hosting space, we will now show you how to secure TT-RSS reader. Secure TT-RSS Reader One of the main reasons to move to an RSS aggregator like TT-RSS is maintaining your privacy. So if you do not secure TT-RSS reader well you are not only making your data available public but also making your system vulnerable to potential attacks. Choosing a strong username and password while setting your TT-RSS is the first basic thing that you can do to secure TT-RSS reader. Listed below are few more ways you can increase TT-RSS reader’s security. 1. Rename TT-RSS Folder One of the first lines of defense is to not use tt-rss in your URL to access your TT-RSS reader. To do this on your hosting account, use a folder name other than tt-rss while installing TT-RSS. On your Linux home server, edit /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf and change the first /tt-rss to something else. An example is shown below. TT-RSS Rename URL TT-RSS Rename URL After making the change, restart your TT-RSS and Apache to apply the changes: sudo service tt-rss restart sudo serivce apache2 reload Your TT-RSS reader is now available through the new URL (example: http://mydomain.com/myreader) only. Amazon Kindle Fire HDX 2. Enable SSL Accessing TT-RSS through http sends all information as unencrypted data. This could mean less privacy due to potential sniffing. The solution is to encrypt the data during transfer, which makes sniffing by hackers harder. To enable and enforce HTTPS access on Linux servers with Apache, install the following run-time libraries: sudo apt-get install libssl0.9.8 libpam0g openssl Restart your Apache server as shown above. You should now be able to access your TT-RSS reader with HTTPS. Note that you may have to have a SSL certificate generated. Refer to Apache documentation if you want to generate your own certificate. By default, the system will install self-signed certificates for you. These certificates are likely to raise warnings when you point your browser to the site. 3. Disable Single User Mode By default the single user mode is already disabled (in /etc/tt-rss/config.php). Enabling single user mode will also disable TT-RSS login system. Therefore, keep the single user mode disabled. Disable Single User Mode Disable Single User Mode A better way to make it a single user system is by limiting the number of registrations to 1 as described below. For whatever reason, you still want to enable single user mode, make sure you implement Apache Authentication method described below. 4. Self Registrations Self registrations allow a visitor to register themselves, which could reduce TT-RSS security. If your TT-RSS will be for personal use only, then you may want to disable user registration by setting “ENABLE_REGISTRATION” to “false”. TT-RSS Self Registrations TT-RSS Self Registrations To further secure TT-RSS Reader, uou may also want to change “REG_MAX_USERS” to “1” to make your account the only account on TT-RSS. asus n66uASUS RT-N66U Dual-Band Wireless-N900 Gigabit Router asus n66u reviewsFind out why it is rated the best wireless router in its class. 5. Apache Authentication Last but not the least, enable Authentication. This is even more important if you have enabled “Single User Mode” describe above. Every time you access TT-RSS, you will be asked for a username and password as shown in the picture below: Secure TT-RSS Reader On your hosting account this equivalent to password protecting a directory, in this case the TT-RSS directory. To do this on your Ubuntu server, you will have to create a .htpasswd file. More information is available in Apache documentation. But the easiest way to achieve this is to use one of the htpasswd generators available online. After you enter the username and password two code blocks will be generated. Copy the contents of the .htpasswd code block and save it to /etc/apache2/.htpasswd_ttrss. Next, copy the contents of the .htaccess code block and add it to /etc/tt-rss/apache.conf as shown below: TT-RSS Apache Authentication TT-RSS Apache Authentication Save and exit. Restart both TT-RSS and Apache previous shown above. You should be prompted for a password every time you try to access TT-RSS. Some may think that this double authentication method is an extra inconvenience. But I would rather be safe than sorry. Go ahead, secure Tiny Tiny RSS Reader and enjoy reading articles on your private secure RSS Reader.
http://www.htpcbeginner.com/secure-tt-rss-reader/

1517 THE MUTANT MACHINE Dynamic Analog Percussion Engine
MICROCONTROLLER FREE ANALOG PERCUSSION SYNTHESIS unique Inverter Core oscillators form the MEMBRANE. Each analog oscillator has three waveforms to select from capable of synthesizing everything from heavy-hitting bassdrums to classic 909-style snares and other complex timbres modular design gives the Machine many auxiliary purposes, great for modular sound design of many varieties, and not just percussion the SNAPPY section is comprised of a voltage controlled noise oscillator, for modelling the noisy part of drum timbres both MEMBRANE and SNAPPY elements have an external input for replacing the built-in sound sources, opening up many avenues of possibility 13 control voltage and audio inputs, for a fully modular drum experience 7 audio and CV/gate outputs for maximum integration with other modules dedicated outputs for each WAVE and NOISE oscillator mean you can use the Machine as a complex VCO in your system, when not synthesizing percussion WAVEFORM SCANNING FEATURE GENERATES COMPLEX TIMBRES the MEMBRANE’s waveforms can be scanned through automatically by the wavescanner’s voltage controlled clock generator, or an external clock or VCO can be used SCAN FREQ CV forms a unique form of timbre control, making the Machine act like a complex oscillator at its WAVES output the ENABLE input allows you to gate the wavescanner on and off with a CV or gate signal ARCHITECTURE OF THE MACHINE The Mutant Machine is a dynamic analog instrument capable of generating a wide palette of sounds, ranging from various forms of analog percussion to complex drones and oscillations. To achieve this, the Machine features two synthesis sections which are summed together at the final output: MEMBRANE and SNAPPY. Like the other Mutant Drums, the MEMBRANE and SNAPPY circuits began their mutation as classic analog percussion techniques and have been reimagined for 21st century modular synthesis. The MEMBRANE forms the main body of the sound by way of two analog VCOs, and the SNAPPY section further adds to the timbre by contributing noisy elements to the mix. A noisy CLICK which occurs at the beginning of the SNAPPY sound can have its volume adjusted independent of the main decaying SNAPPY texture. The waveforms which make up the MEMBRANE can be selected manually by button press, or the WAVESCANNER can be used to automatically scan through the available analog waveforms. By modulating the frequency through which waves are scanned, unique, complex sounds are created. Experimentation is encouraged by the many modulation inputs and outputs available to you. The Machine features 8 CV and gate inputs for modulation as well as two external audio inputs, for bringing other modules into the Machine’s core. There are many audio outputs for maximum versatility, allowing you to use the Machine to create drones and alien timbres for use elsewhere in the modular analog system.
http://www.hexinverter.net/mutant-machine

1502 Phone-Reluctant Introverts, There is Nothing Wrong With You
As I sit down to write this blog post there is the dreaded sound of a prolonged vibration as my phone skids, bouncing and sporadically across my desk. This is perfectly ideal and ironic distraction that actually befits the very thing I am thinking about and from which it is distracting me… Itself! I have always had an absolute detest for talking on the phone. And I’ll say now that it has nothing whatsoever to do with the person at the other end, I just find it a horrible tool for communicating with. Phone Box I think I probably am, and always have been worse than most people when it comes to using the phone (in the traditional sense, ie speaking to people) but if you can identify with any of this then read on. If you’re thinking, “what are you on about, I love the phone” then you’ll probably just get confused, but if you also have friends who ‘never answer the phone’ then this might help you to understand them a bit better. I can’t sum it up any better than Sophia Dembling in her article, 9 Signs that You Might Be an Introvert:
http://www.sheepdressedlikewolves.com/phone-reluctant-introvert/

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1381 COLLIN CUNNINGHAM / NARBOTIC INSTRUMENTS
COLLIN CUNNINGHAM / NARBOTIC INSTRUMENTS [BLOG] MidiVox CV sketch update 02.05.2012 The MidiVox CV sketch has been updated to work with Arduino 1.0 - grab it here Also be sure to use the new version of the Midi Library as well! Also, also: Some previous comments on earlier posts seem to have been lost in a recent Disqus migration - apologies to previous commenters. 7 Comments Updated Midi Library & site changes 01.23.2012 Perhaps you noticed narbotic.com looks different? It is different! A big thanks to everyone who picked up a MidiVox kit - you are now the proud owner of a rare piece of electronics. Though the kit is no longer in production, there is now a new version of the Midi Libray which has been updated to work with the Arduino 1.0 IDE. In addition to an aesthetic reboot, this site will now serve as your premiere destination for all things Collin Cunningham on the web. (and I vow that will be the one & only time I refer to myself in the third-person) New things are in the works - more to come 2 Comments
http://narbotic.com/?p=130

1143 Make music with p01's Speech Synth
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http://pouet.net/topic.php?which=8682&page=1

1132 Mammoth Modular Synthesizer At MIT Museum
Just got an update from Joe Paradiso on his homebuilt mammoth analog modular synthesizer. He’s installed it in the MIT Museum and has completed a fairly epic patch which you can listen to (24 hours a day!) here. Joe will be at the museum this Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm, demoing the synth to visitors, so be sure to stop by if you’re in the neighborhood. Here’s some info from Joe on the construction and inspiration for the latest patch. The second patch I made at the MIT Museum is totally done now, and you can hear it live on the stream. Listen to it at http://synth.media.mit.edu, and let me know what you think if you’re inclined – it’s running in physical space in Quad, of course – stereo on the stream. Note that this one has absolutely NO sequencer of any sort on it – all of the patterns you hear were made entirely from hand-patched logic (counters, ands, ors, flip flops, ring counters, rate multipliers, etc.). It’s an entirely different kind of composition environment from the norm – you really need to simultaneously be an engineer while being an artist and something of a performer. The inspiration for this patch started with the Boredoms – if you don’t know who they are, you should (http://www.boredoms.jp/). In particular, I was thinking of SuperRoots 9. The beauty of the patching interface is that you can never exactly nail what you start out to attain, but on the other hand, you get drawn into places you wouldn’t have normally gone once you start. The 3 drummers that Yamantaka Eye performs with lay down a compelling rhythm that my hand-patched logic and analog processing can’t match, of course. But this patch definitely has a strange jumpy groove once it gets into gear, and the 2-chord pad is archetypical too. Yes, Boredoms rule today! BTW, this patch took every cord I had, plus a good 30 more wires just shoved into the pin jacks – check out the photos here and here – the latter shows the kind of logic section patching complexity you need to build a sonic environment like this one. I’m ripping this baby out next Thursday, as I’ll be at the museum next Thursday and Friday (2/23 and 2/24) at 1pm to demonstrate the synthesizer to visitors – doing some very simple patches and showing off what the modules do in case anybody is interested in this. It will run continuously until then. Otherwise, enjoy the stream – there are moments of introspective drift in-between wild percussion (yes, Boredoms!). I might pull the percussion line back so it doesn’t come so often or regularly, but it’s essentially a wrap.
http://synth.media.mit.edu/

1098 Musicians! What are the crappiest pieces of hardware/software you ever used?
pouët.net - your online demoscene resource pouët.net,256b,1k,4k,40k,64k,cracktro,demo,dentro,diskmag,intro,invitation,lobster sex,musicdisk,Amiga AGA,Amiga ECS,Amiga PPC,Amstrad CPC,Atari ST,BeOS,Commodore 64,Falcon,MS-Dos,Linux,MacOS,Windows
http://www.pouet.net/topic.php?which=8453&com=25&which=8453&com=25&page=2&x=9&y=6

1078 The Modular Synth
A long time ago, in a galaxy far away, before your local music shop was packed with the latest digital synths, even before the early analogue monosynths, if you wanted a synthesizer you had to make it yourself. Modular synthesis is not in itself a different type of synthesis, but refers to the fact that a synth would be built up from individual components (modules) , which would be linked together (patched) in a configuration decided by the person doing the building. Compared with today's 'plug and play' synths which come with 100's of presets, GM soundsets, etc, this has the obvious disadvantage that 'recalling' a preset can only be done if your synth is patched together in exactly the same way every time and every controller has to be manually set to the same parameter. However, the big advantage of Modular synthesis, of course, is that, providing you have the right components, you can build practically anything you want, without being constrained by the 'hardwired' configurations of modern factory built synthesizers. The Pulsar/Scope Modular synth, like any other Modular 'soft synth' brings together the advantages of both Modular synths and modern factory built synths. Modular configurations can be saved as patches for total recall later on, and each patch can contain any number of presets, again for later recall. Furthermore, with a software modular, you can re-use each component as many times as you wish within one patch, you never run out of cables, you don't have to dedicate a whole room to the synth and the modules never suffer from physical damage. What's more, each parameter can be controlled by MIDI so parameter changes can be recorded into your sequencer in real-time.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/themodularsynth.shtml

1050 Frieze Magazine | Comment | Conrad Schnitzler
In the early 1960s, Conrad Schnitzler met Joseph Beuys in a bar in Düsseldorf. Beuys was at the start of his legendary run as a professor of ‘monumental sculpture’ at Düsseldorf’s Kunstakademie. Schnitzler was a sailor, who specialized in fixing the engines of merchant ships in nearby ports. Beuys took a liking to Schnitzler, inviting him to be one of his students. Schnitzler enrolled at the Kunstakademie, but dropped out a year or two later, much to Beuys’ dismay. If, as Beuys famously entreated, ‘everybody is an artist’, why did he have to go to school to be one? Schnitzler travelled for a few years, making metal sculptures and performance art. Then he took the metal sculptures he built during his time with Beuys, which he had covered in stark planes of black and white paint, dragged them all to a grassy field, and left them there.
http://www.frieze.com/comment/article/conrad-schnitzler/

1043 Monotribe, MIDI and me
synth When I heard about the monotribe, I had my doubts. Mostly that there’s only one pattern, which is 8 steps long. Well, there are 8 extra steps for the drums, as well as a “flux mode” which records your movements on the ribbon continuously. In that sense, it is limited, and is an instrument made to be played with your hands, rather than be programmed. But as it turned out, this was a design choice, and not a technical limitation. I can easily imagine why. They wanted it to seem as analog and playful as possible. Same thing with MIDI. Officially, the monotribe doesn’t support MIDI. It does however offer a sync pulse output and input. This allows it to be synced to other monotribes, modular synthesizers or even Korg’s own virtual iMS-20/iElectribe, using a special sync app on a second iPhone/Pod/Pad. However, the lack of MIDI is still a slight limitation.
http://blog.gg8.se/wordpress/2011/08/14/monotribe-midi-and-me/

1020 GnomeActivityJournal - GNOME Live!
GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Contents GNOME Activity Journal (formerly GNOME Zeitgeist) Overview Code Getting in touch Use cases Grouping and Filtering Features TODO GUI Sprints Architecture Long term goals Video Mockups And Current Usage Sub Pages See Zeitgeist for information about the Zeitgeist engine used internally by the GNOME Activity Journal. Overview The GNOME Activity Journal is a tool for easily browsing and finding files on your computer. It uses Zeitgeist to get information and metadata on what files/websites/contacts/etc. you worked with. Links: Zeitgeist Website, Zeitgeist on Launchpad, GNOME Activity Journal on Launchpad Code The Zeitgeist code is split into two modules: GNOME Activity Journal (GTK+ interface) Project page: https://launchpad.net/gnome-activity-journal Repository: bzr branch lp:gnome-activity-journal Zeitgeist Engine Project page: https://launchpad.net/zeitgeist Repository: bzr branch lp:zeitgeist Getting in touch Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~gnome-zeitgeist-users IRC: #zeitgeist @ irc.freenode.net, #gnome-zeitgeist @ irc.gimp.org Use cases John turns on his computer to work on his seminar paper. Instead of digging through his hierarchal file system, he simply opens up GNOME Activity Journal and clicks on the top item in the "Recently Used Files" list. When he realizes that he can't remember the name of the website that he was reading for research yesterday, he simply looks at the list of files related to his paper and clicks on the website. More at the Zeitgeist Vision page. Grouping and Filtering Our goal is to group/filter the data by: Type of data Source Time Name Tags Neighbouring Data Comments Location of use (GPS) Features Browse activities Drag and Drop (not for links) Tagging Auto tagging Searching Filtering by Dataproviders/Time/Tags Bookmark Data TODO GUI Sprints Add an actions toolbar to quickly share items by email or instant messaging. (See nautilus-share) Architecture Experiment with Tracker, Soylent, and Empathy. Long term goals Better metadata extraction (see some of the sprints above) Integration with other computers and mobile devices. Video Zeitgeist video GAJ video Mockups And Current Usage Some work was done by the City of Largo in the past which replicated some of the features of the Activity Journal. Possibly some of this work can result in ideas for improving the User Interface. Mockups And Usage. Sub Pages /BolzanoIdeas /CityOfLargo /Ideas
http://live.gnome.org/action/show/GnomeActivityJournal?action=show&redirect=GnomeZeitgeist

1011 Atomic Synth Inspired By Buchla, Future Retro Revolution » Synthtopia
Synthesizer and electronic music news, synth and music software reviews and more! Atomic is a 16 step sequencer composing tool with a built in synth that also has the ability to control other softsynths or even hardware via its MIDI out function. The design is circular, inspired by step sequencers such as the Buchla Arbitrary Function Generator and Future Retro Revolution. You can preview Atomic below: Strange Atomics [ 0:46 ] Hide Player | Play in Popup | Download Sequencer: 16 step sequencer in a circular design with 3 rows: seminotes, velocity and gate. BPM Rate with 5 modes including random. Separate rhythm grid. Advanced arpeggiator with separate rate, 5 modes with gate and octave controls. Latch mode for continuous play. MIDI Out for use in modular hosts which also includes LFO’s and step modulators to control external vst’s or hardware. Synth: 2 Oscillators with 14 waveforms including additive partials. Separate phase controls, detune and octave as well as harmonic tuning mode. VCF with 4 filter types with velocity control. 2 dedicated envelope generators, one for amp and one for filter. 2 LFOs, Sub Oscillator, Step Modulator, Random Generator and Keyboard control with zone and mod wheel assign which includes sequencer controls for step and rate. Comprehensive mod matrix. Effects X-Y delay with separate multimode filters which can be modulated via mod matrix. Spacial stereo reverb Phaser with wide sweeping range. Master section with volume, pan and tuning CC map for hardware MIDI knob controllers.
http://www.synthtopia.com/content/2008/04/15/atomic-synth-inspired-by-buchla-future-retro-revolution/

1007 Advanced Programming Techniques for Modular Synthesizers / Nord Modular
1 Introduction 1.1 The Purpose of this Document 1.2 Acknowledgements 2 Oscillator Waveform Modification 2.1 Sync 2.2 Frequency Modulation Techniques 2.3 Wave Shaping 2.4 Vector Synthesis 2.5 Wave Sequencing 2.6 Audio-Rate Crossfading 2.7 Wave Terrain Synthesis 2.8 VOSIM 2.9 FOF Synthesis 2.10 Granular Synthesis 3 Filter Techniques 3.1 Resonant Filters as Oscillators 3.2 Serial and Parallel Filter Techniques 3.3 Audio-Rate Filter Cutoff Modulation 3.4 Adding Analog Feel 3.5 Wet Filters 4 Noise Generation 4.1 White Noise 4.2 Brown Noise 4.3 Pink Noise 4.4 Pitched Noise 5 Percussion 5.1 Bass Drum Synthesis 5.2 Snare Drum Synthesis 5.3 Synthesis of Gongs, Bells and Cymbals 5.4 Synthesis of Hand Claps 6 Additive Synthesis 6.1 What is Additive Synthesis? 6.2 Resynthesis 6.3 Group Additive Synthesis 6.4 Morphing 6.5 Transients 6.7 Which Oscillator to Use 7 Physical Modeling 7.1 Introduction to Physical Modeling 7.2 The Karplus-Strong Algorithm 7.3 Tuning of Delay Lines 7.4 Delay Line Details 7.5 Physical Modeling with Digital Waveguides 7.6 String Modeling 7.7 Woodwind Modeling 7.8 Related Links 8 Speech Synthesis and Processing 8.1 Vocoder Techniques 8.2 Speech Synthesis 8.3 Pitch Tracking 9 Using the Logic Modules 9.1 Complex Logic Functions 9.2 Flipflops, Counters other Sequential Elements 9.3 Asynchronous Elements 9.4 Arpeggiation 10 Algorithmic Composition 10.1 Chaos and Fractal Music 10.2 Cellular Automata 10.3 Cooking Noodles 11 Reverb and Echo Effects 11.1 Synthetic Echo and Reverb 11.2 Short-Time Reverb 11.3 Low-Fidelity Echo and Reverb 12 Distortion Effects 12.1 Distortion using Nonlinearities 12.2 Multiband Distortion 12.3 Polynomial Distortion 12.4 Distortion using Time-Variant Systems 13 Frequency and Pitch Shifting 13.1 Frequency Shifting 13.2 Pitch Shifting 14 Spatialization 15 Emulating Classic Synths 15.1 General Guidelines 15.2 Yamaha DX7 15.3 Octave Cat 15.4 ARP Odyssey 15.5 Casio 15.6 Hallsey Mark 1 and 2 15.7 Other Emulations
http://www.cim.mcgill.ca/~clark/nordmodularbook/nm_book_toc.html

973 zCover X5
iPod, nano, iAUdio, Samsung, YH820, YH925, Sony, Walkman, MN-HD5, network, Tosiba, Gigabeat, Sony PSP, iPod, iPod G4, iPod mini, iPod Shuffle, iRiver, iRiver H10, PalmOne, Tero600, Tero650, Creative, Zen, Creative Zen Micro, Creative Zen PMC, PMC, Camouflage, Candy, original, silicone, silicon, silicone alliance, case, skin, silicone case, silicone skin, protector Headphone & USB Reset hole Mic hole Power Switch Advanced molding technology and contour design in the latest style allows full access to all controls and connectors. Low Profile removable, rotating Belt Clip can be rotated and locked so that you can wear your iAudio vertically or horizontally when clipped to your belt. Crystal clear Hard Screen Protector with Rubber Ring Pad provides the best protection and vision effect, it won't slid around or scratch your device. Applied SA flipper lid concept, integrated subpack port flipper cover can help to keep dust, dirt and liquids out. Removable Belt clip with a soft landing insert disk, which will not scratch your device.S zCover silicone cases are crafted from non-toxic, durable HealthCare grade silicone rubber. It is safe Washable - you can wash zCover silicone case by hand. Make sure it’s dried out before putting your iAudio into it. Dry it in room temperature. Please avoid direct fire and direct bright sunshine.
http://www.zcover.com/zCover_Product_iAudio_Original.htm

897 Generic Synth Preset Storage and Conversion
For my synths with preset storage and the ability to dump & load presets via midi sysex, I wanted to be able to feed the sysex of a synth into a software program which can display the sound parameters in a meaningful form, and convert the sound into the sysex format of any of my other presets synths The generic patch storage format must display meaningful values for the parameters (filter envelope amount = 1/2 octave, envelope 1 attack = 50ms, etc) and convert between these values and a given synth's sysex (as much as possible - resolution probably isn't good enough to get envelope attack to exactly 50ms on each and every synth, and envelope shapes vary between synths, etc). The storage format will also store the original parameters, using the "native" value range of each parameter (e.g. filter cutoff frequency between 0 and 127) as well as the original sysex program as an ASCII hex dump. Since I didn't find any software which could do this, I began writing my own in Java. I am concentrating on converting basic analog components; any on-board effects are not used.
http://www.nmrailrunners.org/synth/gpc/index.html

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.
http://jhaible.de/polykorg/jh_polykorg_clone.html

878 Paul's Extreme Sound Stretch
This is a program for stretching the audio. It is suitable only for extreme sound stretching of the audio (like 50x) and for applying special effects by "spectral smoothing" the sounds. It can transform any sound/music to a texture. The program is Open-Source and it's released under the version 2 of the General Public License. You can download the source code for Linux or the Windows binaries. Please note that this is suitable only for extreme time stretching (e.g. if have a melody of 3 minutes and you want to listen it in 3 hours). If you want "less extreme" time stretching, you can use a program which contains the SoundTouch library.
http://hypermammut.sourceforge.net/paulstretch/

873 Search Results: Items matching occult taken from The Goetia: The Lesser Key of Solomon the King (1904)
occult: literally, that which is hidden, or secret knowledge, but in this case anything to do with magick, pagan rituals, necromancy and so forth.
http://www.fromoldbooks.org/Search/?kw=occult%3Bsource=Mathers-Goetia%3Bpg=7

843 PC Pedia -| Blogger| Computer Tips | tricks |Internet Tools |SEO| Tech | Reviews: Increase Traffic by 150-300% with Wahoha- Unique visitors
PC PEDIA is a Technology Blog which mainly Focuses on Computer Tips,Blogging,Tricks,Technology,Internet tools that helps you work smarter and geekier Computer Tips, blog,Blogging,Internet tools,Technology,Tricks,tweepi,reviews,Delete Yahoo Account Permanently,free ways to bring traffic,facepad
http://pcpedia.blogspot.com/2011/01/increase-traffic-by-150-300-with-wahoha.html

812 ED102 - Octave-Volts-Hertz
The ED102 borrows heavily from the Korg MS-02™ although it was developed independently of Korg Inc. Korg and MS-02 are the trademarks of Korg Inc. Among presently available music synthesizers, there are two different types of control system used for controlling devices such as the VCO (voltage controlled oscillator) and VCF (voltage controlled filter). These two systems been: Hertz/Volt (Hz/V) and Octave/Volt (Oct/V). The graph to the left shows the relationship between the VCO oscillator frequency (pitch) and the control voltage (keyboard output voltage). The straight line on the graph is from a synthesizer in which there is a one octave change for every one volt change in the control voltage (Oct/V). In contrast, the curved line on the graph is the control voltage from a synthesizer in which the VCO frequency is proportional to voltage (Hz/V system). To allow these systems to work together you will need a module like this ED102. The built-in, fully adjustable log amp and anti-log amp ensure complete system flexibility and compatibility between any presently voltage controlled synthesiser. The Hz/V system In the Hz/V system, the VCO oscillator frequency is proportional to the control voltage so that, for example, if the frequency of a VCO increases by 100Hz for every volt applied, then applying 1V, 2V and 3V to this VCO would generate 100Hz, 200Hz and 300Hz respectively. The Oct/V system In the Oct/V system the VCO oscillator frequency changes one octave for every one volt change in the control voltage so that, for example, 1V, 2V and 3V to a VCO would generate 200Hz, 400Hz and 800Hz respectively. Features and Functions Log Amp: This changes a Hz/V type keyboard CV (control voltage) output into an OCT/V type of CV. Use the Log Amp to change the control signal from, say, a Korg or Yamaha synthesiser into a signal you can use with another type of synthesizer. Antilog Amp: This changes an OCT/V type of keyboard CV output into a Hz/V type of CV. Use this Antilog Amp when you want to control, say, a Korg synthesiser by means of a unit that uses the OCT/V system.
http://www.elby-designs.com/panther/ed102-octave-volts-hertz/ed102.htm

801 Roland TB-303 Clones Contest. Which is the best emulator? Test Conclusions
Which is the best Roland TB 303 clones - Audio comparison test synthesizer Future Retro Revolution 777 Syntecno TeeBee acidlab ml 303 mam MB33 xoxbox tm3030 emulator .
http://www.acidvoice.com/tb_303_clones_contest.htm

781 Atlas obscura
About the Atlas Obscura Welcome to the Atlas Obscura, a compendium of this age's wonders, curiosities, and esoterica. The Atlas Obscura is a collaborative project with the goal of cataloging all of the singular, eccentric, bizarre, fantastical, and strange out-of-the-way places that get left out of traditional travel guidebooks and are ignored by the average tourist. If you're looking for miniature cities, glass flowers, books bound in human skin, gigantic flaming holes in the ground, phallological museums, bone churches, balancing pagodas, or homes built entirely out of paper, the Atlas Obscura is where you'll find them. The Atlas Obscura is not just about collecting oddities. In an age where everything seems to have been explored and there is nothing new to be found, the Atlas Obscura celebrates a different way of traveling, and a different lens through which to view the world. The Atlas Obscura depends on our community of far-flung explorers to find and report back about the world's wonders and curiosities. If you have been to, know of, or have heard about a place that belongs in the Atlas Obscura, we want you to tell us about it. Anyone and everyone is welcome and encouraged to nominate places for inclusion, and to edit content already in the Atlas. Thanks for stopping by, and good exploring!
http://atlasobscura.com/globe/europe/france?page=3

777 SPERRZONE: [ K E Y C H A I N S ]: Zazzle.com Store
About Beat Hauser, SPERRZONE Beat Hauser is interested in industrial archaeology and history of Europe. His special area is the brewing industry of Switzerland and the former German Democratic Republic. Since 2003 he is taking pictures of industrial areas and abandoned places within all Europe. On his web site SPERRZONE (www.sperrzone.net) he does not only present his own pictures, but also some information about the related factories and places as well as historical photo post cards, old letter heads, labels, advertisings to document the history of the factories. Most pictures are taken in abandoned factories. Abandoned places and industrial ruins are generally seen as “spots of dirt” and people feel uncomfortable around them. Often such places have a very long and interesting history, which seems almost forgotten today. Instead of the activity of former days there is nothing but silence and emptiness. Instead of windows, black holes are staring out of the walls. But very often the architecture of elapsed eras is attractive and astonishing. In combination with the emptiness and beginning decay, such places often spread the impression of a dream world. Decay and nature give new structures to strictly geometric forms and lines, e.g. in production halls. Moisture, moss and rust give new colors to gray halls. Beat Hauser tries to capture these impressions with his photographs. Aesthetics of decay is illustrated in its huge variety from huge industrial plants to small details. Past exhibitions 10 Jun – 1 Jul 2007 3Fotografen3, Alte evangelische Kirche Kirchzarten (Exhibition of the 3 winners of the „KirchzARTener FOTOsalons 2006“) 2 Dec – 3 Dec 2006 KirchzARTener FOTOsalon 2006, Kurhaus Kirchzarten (Photo contest with 54 participants, 1. rank) 20 Nov – 21 Nov 2004 KirchzARTener FOTOsalon 2004, Kurhaus Kirchzarten (Photo contest with 46 participants, 11. rank) Several beamer shows at party events of „Rigor Mortis“ and „Solanaceae“ in Basle, Aarau, Pratteln and Reinach (all Switzerland) sperrzone, industry, industrial, archaeology, industrie, industriekultur, zerfall, decay, architektur, architecture
http://www.zazzle.com/sperrzone/gifts?cg=196119980926265824

767 The 5 types of programmers « Steven Benner's Blog
In my code journeys and programming adventures I’ve encountered many strange foes, and even stranger allies. I’ve identified at least five different kinds of code warriors, some make for wonderful comrades in arms, while others seem to foil my every plan. However they all have their place in the pantheon of software development. Without a healthy mix of these different programming styles you’ll probably find your projects either take too long to complete, are not stable enough or are too perfect for humans to look upon. The duct tape programmer The code may not be pretty, but damnit, it works! This guy is the foundation of your company. When something goes wrong he will fix it fast and in a way that won’t break again. Of course he doesn’t care about how it looks, ease of use, or any of those other trivial concerns, but he will make it happen, without a bunch of talk or time-wasting nonsense. The best way to use this person is to point at a problem and walk away. The OCD perfectionist programmer You want to do what to my code? This guy doesn’t care about your deadlines or budgets, those are insignificant when compared to the art form that is programming. When you do finally receive the finished product you will have no option but submit to the stunning glory and radiant beauty of perfectly formatted, no, perfectly beautiful code, that is so efficient that anything you would want to do to it would do nothing but defame a masterpiece. He is the only one qualified to work on his code. The anti-programming programmer I’m a programmer, damnit. I don’t write code. His world has one simple truth; writing code is bad. If you have to write something then you’re doing it wrong. Someone else has already done the work so just use their code. He will tell you how much faster this development practice is, even though he takes as long or longer than the other programmers. But when you get the project it will only be 20 lines of actual code and will be very easy to read. It may not be very fast, efficient, or forward-compatible, but it will be done with the least effort required. The half-assed programmer What do you want? It works doesn’t it? The guy who couldn’t care less about quality, that’s someone elses job. He accomplishes the tasks that he’s asked to do, quickly. You may not like his work, the other programmers hate it, but management and the clients love it. As much pain as he will cause you in the future, he is single-handedly keeping your deadlines so you can’t scoff at it (no matter how much you want to). The theoretical programmer Well, that’s a possibility, but in practice this might be a better alternative. This guy is more interested the options than what should be done. He will spend 80% of his time staring blankly at his computer thinking up ways to accomplish a task, 15% of his time complaining about unreasonable deadlines, 4% of his time refining the options, and 1% of his time writing code. When you receive the final work it will always be accompanied by the phrase “if I had more time I could have done this the right way”. Where do you fit? Personally, I’d have to classify myself as the perfectionist. So, which type of programmer are you? Or perhaps you know another programming archetype that is missing from my list? Post a comment below and I’ll add it to a new updated list.
http://stevenbenner.com/2010/07/the-5-types-of-programmers/

761 Midi Software - Synth Zone
MIDI Sequencing SoftwareAnvil Studio Anvil Studio is a MIDI and audio sequencer and is free software for Windows users. Building Blocks Building Blocks for Windows is a multifunctional MIDI application / modular sequencer, that allows you to build custom controller remapping, LFO's, arpeggiators, autochords, drum and note sequences, echoes etc. Busker A Windows score editor and player that has Yamaha style support. 1000s of Yamaha styles can be downloaded for free. Another great music software tool from Jos Maas. Cakewalk Sonar Windows & Mac sequencer now with integrated midi and audio. Sonar demo available. For other Cakewalk resources see Synth Zone's Cakewalk Page Cubase - Steinberg Featuring integrated midi & audio package Cubase VST For more info & related links see Synth Zone's Cubase Links Cursed Sequencer Open Source sequencer for Windows and Linux. Digital Performer MOTU presents Digital Performer for the Mac, a complete digital audio and MIDI production environment. Competitive upgrades available. See the new Digital Performer mailing list. Ditty Ditty is a freeware MIDI sequencer for Windows aimed at assisting piano practice. Easybeat Mac MIDI sequencing software from Uni Software Plus. Features include a software GM wavetable synth. Energy XT Energy XT is Windows sequencer/composer software. Fl Studio Windows application that provides easy to use yet powerful MIDI/digital audio sequencing and looping tools. Intuem Mac OSX MIDI sequencer that provides a variable-tempo system and a simple way to transform a real, human, performance into a sequence where bars and beats actually have meaning. Time restricted version available to download. Jammer - Soundtrek Jammer for Windows provides a 256 Track MIDI sequencer with built in studio musicians. A very useful program for creating arrangements & drum tracks with assistance from the software. Also check the Yahoo Jammer Group. JUMP A highly streamlined Windows MIDI sequencer, designed to help you compose music Jazzware - Jazz++ Windows & Linux open source MIDI sequencer with audio support. If you need a MIDI sequencer you really should check it out. Logic Pro Audio Apple's MIDI & audio solution for the Mac. For Emagic product support see the Emagic Legacy pages at Apple. For related information see Emagic Users Page with resources & mailing list for Emagic products, the Logic Users' Net which includes Mac related info, and the Powerkeys "Learning Logic" web site. SwiftKick provides and archive for the Logic Users' Group environments. Editors, MIDI processors etc. are available. Omega Art has Logic info and resources. You can read the History Of Logic at Tweakheadz Lab. Magix Magix Music Studio incorporates a MIDI sequencer with its digital audio sequencer. Massiva An audio/MIDI sequencer for Windows users with undo plus plugin support. This is just an archive of an old site. You can still get it from AudioMelody.com. Massiva has now moved on to become Energy XT Mixcraft Windows software that supports MIDI and audio sequencing.. MU.LAB An alternative, hi-quality music application for Mac OSX and Windows with MIDI and audio support. MultitrackStudio Window digital audio recorder with VST 2.0 plugin and MIDI support. Freeware version and pro versions available. Music Master Win sequencing & notation package with a full graphic interface for Roland VS880 control & integration. Music Master Works A shareware Windows sequencing & accompaniment package. Win95 & Win3.1 versions available. From Aspire software MusicPhrase XL MusicPhrase for Windows is a creative tool for composing music. Features phrase sequencing and visual groove editing tools. Music Studio Producer Music Studio Producer is a free Windows MIDI sequencer, DAW which can host VST(i), supports ASIO. From Aspire software Numerology Numerology is a modular sequencing and audio plugin environment for Mac OS X. Onyx Onyx by Jasmine Music provides powerful sequencing, harmonizer and MIDI-2-Audio rendering. Power Chords By Howling Dog Systems - Innovative Windows midi sequencer using onscreen guitar fretboard interface, plus other unique features for creating strum & rhythm patterns. Demo available PowerTracks Pro Audio PG Music's budget priced sequencer for Windows now features up to 48 tracks of digital audio with effects, EQ, panning etc plus 3rd party plugin support. Pro Tools Digidesign provide Pro Tools for Windows and Mac with MIDI, multitrack audio and plugin support. Quartz Audio Master Quartz Audio Master is free Windows multitrack digital recording software and MIDI sequencing software. Provided by DigitalSound Planet Reaper REAPER is a fully featured Windows multitrack audio and MIDI recording, editing, processing, mixing, and mastering environment. Fully functional evaluation available for download. Rosegarden Rosegarden is a free MIDI sequencer and notation editor for Unix, and has binary distributions for Linux PCs and SGI IRIX. SoftStep SoftStep is a Win9x modular step sequencer based on modular analog step sequencers. Features modules, which are math and logic functions that you treat as physical boxes with knobs and sliders. Style Enhancer Windows MIDI sequencer based on Performance Modeling technology with powerful and intelligent MIDI-data generation and transformation. SwarShala Midi sequencer package for Windows software that covers both the melodic and rhythmic aspects of Indian music. Featured instruments include Sitar, Sarod, Tanpura, Guitar, Tabla, Pakhawaj, Dholki and Bells. MIDI files and WAV files can be output. Sweet Sixteen Midi sequencer package for Windows from Roni Music. And check out the Sweet MIDI arpeggiator for Windows, very cool !! TR-x0x Freeware Windows step sequencer based on the Roland TR-808/909 drum machines. Tracktion Tracktion from Mackie provides low cost MIDI and audio sequencing. Tunafish A Windows VSTi MIDI sequencer with sample support. A fully functional ( save disabled ) demo is available to download. Has sample support and provides a built-in sample/drum sequencer. Xx A multi-track MIDI sequencer for MacOS. It is also an algorithmic compositional tool. Requires OMS. Midi SoftwareAudible Oddities - Twerk's Tools Audible Oddities is an audio mastering business and Shawn Hatfield also provides some free music composition tools for the Mac featuring sequencing control and algorithmic music generation. Burnt Toast even has a beta version available for Win XP. Catanya Software pattern arpeggiator VST plugin. MIDI-OX Win9x/NT midi utility providing sysex handling, diagnostics, filtering & mapping of midi data Streams. All Windows MIDI users should check this out. It is also available from Yamaha UK. Also see MIDI Yoke which allows you to route MIDI between different applications. vanBasco's Karaoke Player vanBasco's Karaoke Player is freeware Windows software that plays Karaoke (.kar) and standard MIDI (.mid, .midi, .rmi) files. Provides a piano keyboard and lyric display. Vocal Writer Shareware music & vocal synthesis software for the Power Mac. Not only playback & edit GM midi files, but it will also sing your lyrics (85 voices to choose from) Zel Zel is an interpretive MIDI programming language for Windows. Version 1.2 includes the Zel Drum Machine, a style based composer and editor which makes it easy to create MIDI drum tracks without having to learn the Zel language. Freeware. Midi Sequencing Related SitesAtari-MIDI Yahoo Group for Atari computer users to discuss MIDI applications. Also check The Caged Artist Series Page for once commercial MIDI software that is now freeware. Audio Forums Forums for most major sequencing & digital audio software packages. Harmony Central Provide an archive of MIDI sequencer and notation applications to download. There is software for all platforms available. HitSquad Provide links to a number of MIDI sequencers and "tracker" sequencers for Windows, Mac and Linux. MacMusic.org Macmusic.org have lots of links to Mac specific audio and MIDI sequencing resources. . Mac OSX MIDI Apps A very useful list of links to Mac OSX MIDI applications with descriptions and direct links to the websites and apps. Midijoys Freeware Windows program that combines two independent fully programmable joystick controllers, and a Continuous MIDI Controller programmable sliders that can send a wide spectrum of MIDI control parameters. MidiPlugins.com Links to freeware and commercial MIDI plugins for both Windows and Mac OS9/OSX. Music-X Amiga University Info on the original Amiga sequencer Music-X including writing sysex protocols. Also see Driptomatic Fairytales for Music-X info and resources. AM/FM also provide disk images containing many Amiga MIDI articles and tools. Sonic Control Sonic Control provides information and reviews of sequencers for all platforms as well as MIDI hardware. SourceForge SourceForge provide freeware software for Windows, Mac and Linux platforms and have many MIDI sequencer applications. Sweetwater Sequencer Forum Sweetwater.com provides forums including one dedicated to MIDI sequencers. Vintage Sequencers Tweakheadz Lab provides a great rundown on the ancestors of todays sequencers on computers in the 80s. Very interesting and informative reading with screen shots of many sequencers from the early days of MIDI.
http://www.synthzone.com/midiseq.htm

741 17 Useful Htaccess Tricks and Tips
I have collected 17 htaccess methods in this article which I have used or tested it before, and I think some of them are essential tricks and tips to protect your webserver against malicious attacks and other would able to perform simple tasks efficiently such as redirection and web server optimization. queness,kevin liew,tips, tools
http://www.queness.com/post/5421/17-useful-htaccess-tricks-and-tips/

722 Making AJAX Applications Crawlable - Google Code
If you're running an AJAX application with content that you'd like to appear in search results, we have a new process that, when implemented, can help Google (and potentially other search engines) crawl and index your content. Historically, AJAX applications have been difficult for search engines to process because AJAX content is produced dynamically by the browser and thus not visible to crawlers. While there are existing methods for dealing with this problem, they involve regular manual maintenance to keep the content up-to-date. Learn more Learn why search engines don't see the content you see and what needs to happen to fix this. Getting started guide Get started in making your AJAX application visible to search engines. If you are in a hurry, you can start here, but AJAX crawling is a complex topic, so we recommend reading all the documentation. Creating HTML snapshots Learn more about creating HTML snapshots, and which technique might be best suited for your application. Frequently asked questions Having trouble? Check out the frequently asked questions. Specification Get the details.
http://code.google.com/intl/fr/web/ajaxcrawling/

706 Geometry, Surfaces, Curves, Polyhedra
POV-Ray: A Tool for Creating Engaging Visualisation of Geometry Various notes on polygons and meshes Includes Surface (polygon) simplification, Clipping a polygonal facet with an arbitrary plane, Surface Relaxation and Smoothing of polygonal data, Mesh crumpling, splitting polygons, two sided facets, polygon types. Philosophy is written in this grand book - I mean universe - which stands continuously open to our gaze, but which cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language in which it is written. It is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles and other geometric figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it; without these, one is wandering about in a dark labyrinth. Galileo (1623) Distance between a point, a line and a plane The intersection of a line with another line (2D) The closest line between two lines (3D) The intersection of a line with a plane Mathematics describing a plane The intersection of two planes The intersection of three planes Polygon area and centroid calculation Inside / outside polygon test Reflection of a ray Direction Cosines Eulers number and closed surfaces Determining whether a line segment intersects a facet Coordinate transformations on the plane (2D) Cartesian, Cylindrical, and Spherical Euler angles and coordinate transformations Converting between left and right coordinate systems Clipping a line with a polygon Clockwise test for polygons in 2D Test for concave/convex polygon in 2D Area of (planar) polygons in 3D Spheres, equations and terminology The intersection of a line and a sphere (or a circle) Equation of the circle through 3 points Equation of the sphere through 4 points Intersecting area of circles on a plane Rotation of a point about an arbitrary axis Creating a plane/disk perpendicular to a line segment Intersection of two circles on the plane Circumference of an ellipse Intersection of two spheres Distributing Points on a Sphere Quadric equations in x and y of degree 2 Fowler angles: Comparing angles without trigonometry Contouring Algorithm Description of an efficient contouring algorithm as it appeared in Byte magazine. (Byte Magazine, 1987) and a more general approach for arbitrary contour planes and polygonal meshes. Spherical projections Methods for mapping points on a spherical surface onto a plane, stereographic and cylindrical (including Mercator) projections. Includes Aitoff map projection: Conversion to/from longitude/latitude (spherical map) Projection types Classification of projections from 3D to 2D and specific examples of oblique projections. A triangle was an improvement to the square wheel. It eliminated one bump. BC comics Planar (stretching) distortion in the plane Including Anamorphic projections and Mappings in the Complex Plane (Otherwise known as Conformal maps) Polygonising a scalar field Otherwise known as marching cubes and marching tetrahedrons. HyperSpace (Historic) A Macintosh 4 dimensional geometry viewer and manual.
http://local.wasp.uwa.edu.au/~pbourke/geometry/

701 How To Convince The Client That Your Design Is Perfect - Smashing Magazine
As designers who deal with clients, we all have to face one situation, no matter how difficult and uncomfortable, and that is guiding the client to accept that your design is perfect. Now, you already have the project, so this is not a matter of convincing them to pick you for the job. This is about getting them to see that your design satisfies their requirements and contains everything they want. We all have to take on this role of virtual tour guide and lead them through the project’s twists and turns, ensuring that the best interests of the client and website are served. We have to be the lighthouse, guiding the clients to shore. (Image credit) In the end, the final decision falls to the client, but there are times — and most of us have experienced them — when the client’s lack of expertise in the field affect the quality of the design. In such times, we have a responsibility to do everything in our power to convince the client that the design is perfect as it is, and that any further alteration would impair the website’s ability to communicate everything it needs to. This confrontation is not welcome by either party, but it is certainly necessary. Many designers want to avoid conflict and, as a result, cave to their clients at the slightest sign of disagreement, rather than spend time trying to convince them that they stand on the right side of the design decision. This is often a mistake and does not serve the design, which should be the paramount consideration. We owe it to our creative work to argue for whatever serves the design beyond all else, even though the client is footing the bill. We may end up having to give in to the client, but at least we tried. Below is an overview of some tips and techniques you can employ when you find yourself butting heads with a client. These approaches might work individually or in combination, but they all at least offer a launching point to help you put your best foot forward and lead the client exactly where they need to go.
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/10/06/how-to-convince-the-client-that-your-design-is-perfect/

679 Trevor Marshall's ETI3600, ETI4600 International Music Synthesisers and Maplin 3800 and Maplin 5600s Stereo Synthesisers
Many years ago the Australian magazine "Electronics Today International" published my designs for two partly digital, mostly analog, Electronic Music Synthesisers. the ETI 3600 and ETI 4600. Both were made available as kits of components Barry Wilkinson at ETI was responsible for the final packaging and kitting coordination. Maplin Electronics Ltd.(in the UK) subsequently picked up the designs, which they marketed as as the Maplin models 3800 and 5600s Electronic Music Synthesisers At the time I held two Australian provisional patents for the technologies I used in the Synthesiser designs. One related to the method for generating sawtooth waveforms, the other was for the method of using commutated resistors in voltage controlled filters. I never made any money out of the designs, or the patents, which have long ago been allowed to lapse. But it was fun! The original constructional articles for the ETI 3600/4600 can be found in these PDFs: October 1973, December 1973, January 1974, Feb 1974, March 1974, April 1974, July 1974, March 1975, April 1975, May 1975, August 1975 Although the earliest (4004) microprocessors were available at that time, it was not until the late-70's that I first started programming fully digital (Signetics 2650 based) Microcomputer systems. Consequently my early digital designs were hardware, and not firmware, based. Of course, these days, everything in my hardware and firmware is based on software designs - even the interconnections are controlled by the software in the EPLDs and PALs, instead of by wires. So many things have changed over the years.... Here is a mug shot of the Maplin 3800:
http://www.trevormarshall.com/eti.htm

675 9 Ways to Instantly Code Faster | Nettuts+
Doesn't the title say it all? There are a wide variety of tools and techniques which can drastically improve the speed at which we code. Particularly during code,code faster,coding tips,tips,tools
http://net.tutsplus.com/articles/general/9-ways-to-instantly-code-faster/

621 Patternry | User Interface Design Patterns for Ideas and Inspiration
Patternry, previously known as The UI Pattern Factory, is a resource for everyone who needs to design or develop user interfaces. It is a collection of Web design patterns, best practices, which helps you to find inspiration and design interfaces with great user experience. It is also a user interface gallery full of real world examples of our patterns. design patterns, ui design, user interface, design, interaction patterns, user experience, usability, pattern library, best practices, design inspiration
http://www.patternry.com/

579 Most Useful Cheat Sheet For HTML, CSS and Javascript
Get Most Useful HTML, CSS, Javascript Cheat Sheets to do the work effectively which is generally hard to manage by most of the people. useful cheat sheet, cheat sheet, html cheatsheet, css cheatsheet, javascript cheatsheet,css,html,javascript,design
http://technologytosoftware.com/css-javascript-cheat-sheet.html

551 The Top Idea in Your Mind
I realized recently that what one thinks about in the shower in the morning is more important than I'd thought. I knew it was a good time to have ideas. Now I'd go further: now I'd say it's hard to do a really good job on anything you don't think about in the shower. Everyone who's worked on difficult problems is probably familiar with the phenomenon of working hard to figure something out, failing, and then suddenly seeing the answer a bit later while doing something else. There's a kind of thinking you do without trying to. I'm increasingly convinced this type of thinking is not merely helpful in solving hard problems, but necessary. The tricky part is, you can only control it indirectly. [1] I think most people have one top idea in their mind at any given time. That's the idea their thoughts will drift toward when they're allowed to drift freely. And this idea will thus tend to get all the benefit of that type of thinking, while others are starved of it. Which means it's a disaster to let the wrong idea become the top one in your mind. What made this clear to me was having an idea I didn't want as the top one in my mind for two long stretches.
http://www.paulgraham.com/top.html

547 Din Sync: How to modify a Korg Monotron
So here's how to modify Korg's new Monotron analog ribbon synthesizer. Perhaps this is the first document of Monotron mods in Europe since it still hasn't been released here. It's actually a very easy machine to modify because for whatever reason Korg decided to label all the interesting points on the bottom side of the PCB. This may well have been for testing units at the factory/service centers. Perhaps though it could have been that the designers anticipated this little machine would be hacked, much like the Gakken which pretty obviously inspired this piece. Incidentally in the magazine that comes with the Gakken there's a picture of them showing it to Korg, that was in 2008, go figure.
http://www.dinsync.info/2010/06/how-to-modify-korg-monotron.html

534 Synth Secrets: Links to All Parts
This page contains links to every part of Gordon Reid's hugely popular SYNTH SECRETS series which ran for over five years in Sound On Sound magazine (May 1999 to July 2004). Synthesizers, Synthesisers, synthesis, sound synthesis, analogue synthesis, FM synthesis, digital synthesis, yamaha synth, Roland synth, ARP syths, Prophet synthesizers, Moog synths, sound manipulation, Gordon Reid,
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/allsynthsecrets.htm

529 SynthesisWorkshops
synth modular Sound synthesis and sound design Music has brought pleasure and entertainment to mankind throughout the whole of history. Each person is by nature equipped with one of the most elaborate and emotional musical instruments; the human voice. Whenever people feel good music seems to fit the occasion, and it is considered quite natural to hum or sing a song. Musical instruments have brought their own moods to music and at the current moment in human evolution there is an enormous variety of musical instruments available. The twentieth century has seen the development of a range of new and exciting electronic musical instruments. These electronic instruments are very flexible, they can produce a wide range of timbres and can be amplified to whatever loudness level sounds best for the occasion. Most of these electronic instruments are played by a keyboard, but in essence the keyboard can be replaced by any electromechanical device that is able to transform a movement caused by a human interaction into an electrical signal that can drive the sound generating core of the electronic instrument. All sorts of technical and scientific developments have helped to create electronic instruments and the human interface to play them. Still, music is an art and not really a hard science, although music and sound have for a long time been subject to various scientific research. An important realization is that science can not really explain why much music is such a pleasure to listen to and such a joy to make. Which is not a bad thing, as probably no one is waiting for science to take the fun out of music by applying formalized rules and templates on what is also subject to ‘feel’. So, although this book covers techniques that lean heavily on scientific research, the application of these techniques will in general be aimed at creating fun. There are a lot of professionals working with sound and even more people that make music for their personal enjoyment. Mastery of sound synthesis is valuable to all of them. Still, it won’t be easy to please everyone with one single book, as some people will be more interested in how things work and others might want practical examples that just work. The aim of this book is that it can at least be used as a practical guide in workshops and courses in electronic music, covering some essential basics that are needed to operate the equipment used in sound synthesis in a way that makes some sense. Additionally it can be used to explore techniques to find out how they can help in the development of one’s own musical style. Sound synthesis is the art of creating sounds by using suitable electronic means, using either analog or digital electronic devices. Sound design is the art of creating particular sounds using sound synthesis techniques. The definition of sound design as used here might be confusing to some, as the name sound design is also used in the discipline in industrial design that occupies itself with how mass produced objects should sound. Examples are how the sound of cars or ladyshaves are ‘designed’ to sound pleasing while in use. Which of course has nothing to do at all with music or sound synthesizers. This book puts the emphasis on the various synthesis techniques for musical purposes and how to setup sound synthesizers to create a large range of characteristic musical sounds. The art of musical sound design is left to the artist.
http://www.xs4all.nl/~rhordijk/G2Pages/

474 Why Intelligent People Fail
Why Intelligent People Fail Content from Sternberg, R. (1994). In search of the human mind. New York: Harcourt Brace. 1. Lack of motivation. A talent is irrelevant if a person is not motivated to use it. Motivation may be external (for example, social approval) or internal (satisfaction from a job well-done, for instance). External sources tend to be transient, while internal sources tend to produce more consistent performance. 2. Lack of impulse control. Habitual impulsiveness gets in the way of optimal performance. Some people do not bring their full intellectual resources to bear on a problem but go with the first solution that pops into their heads. 3. Lack of perserverance and perseveration. Some people give up too easily, while others are unable to stop even when the quest will clearly be fruitless. 4. Using the wrong abilities. People may not be using the right abilities for the tasks in which they are engaged. 5. Inability to translate thought into action. Some people seem buried in thought. They have good ideas but rarely seem able to do anything about them. 6. Lack of product orientation. Some people seem more concerned about the process than the result of activity. 7. Inability to complete tasks. For some people nothing ever draws to a close. Perhaps it’s fear of what they would do next or fear of becoming hopelessly enmeshed in detail. 8. Failure to initiate. Still others are unwilling or unable to initiate a project. It may be indecision or fear of commitment. 9. Fear of failure. People may not reach peak performance because they avoid the really important challenges in life. 10. Procrastination. Some people are unable to act without pressure. They may also look for little things to do in order to put off the big ones. 11. Misattribution of blame. Some people always blame themselves for even the slightest mishap. Some always blame others. 12. Excessive self-pity. Some people spend more time feeling sorry for themselves than expending the effort necessary to overcome the problem. 13. Excessive dependency. Some people expect others to do for them what they ought to be doing themselves. 14. Wallowing in personal difficulties. Some people let their personal difficulties interfere grossly with their work. During the course of life, one can expect some real joys and some real sorrows. Maintaining a proper perspective is often difficult. 15. Distractibility and lack of concentration. Even some very intelligent people have very short attention spans. 16. Spreading oneself too think or too thick. Undertaking too many activities may result in none being completed on time. Undertaking too few can also result in missed opportunities and reduced levels of accomplishment. 17. Inability to delay gratification. Some people reward themselves and are rewarded by others for finishing small tasks, while avoiding bigger tasks that would earn them larger rewards. 18. Inability to see the forest for the trees. Some people become obsessed with details and are either unwilling or unable to see or deal with the larger picture in the projects they undertake. 19. Lack of balance between critical, analytical thinking and creative, synthetic thinking. It is important for people to learn what kind of thinking is expected of them in each situation. 20. Too little or too much self-confidence. Lack of self-confidence can gnaw away at a person’s ability to get things done and become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Conversely, individuals with too much self-confidence may not know when to admit they are wrong or in need of self-improvement.
http://www.acceleratingfuture.com/michael/works/intelligentfailure.htm

471 45+ Adobe AIR Applications for Designers and Developers
If you are designer or developer then you must check these handy and convenient tools based on Adobe AIR platform which will offer ease and flexibility in your daily routine air,apps,utilities,tools,resources
http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/resources/adobe-air-applications/

464 Ksplice » Attack of the Cosmic Rays! - System administration and software blog
It’s a well-documented fact that RAM in modern computers is susceptible to occasional random bit flips due to various sources of noise, most commonly high-energy cosmic rays. By some estimates, you can even expect error rates as high as one error per 4GB of RAM per day! Many servers these days have ECC RAM, which uses extra bits to store error-correcting codes that let them correct most bit errors, but ECC RAM is still fairly rare in desktops, and unheard-of in laptops. For me, bitflips due to cosmic rays are one of those problems I always assumed happen to “other people”. I also assumed that even if I saw random cosmic-ray bitflips, my computer would probably just crash, and I’d never really be able to tell the difference from some random kernel bug. A few weeks ago, though, I encountered some bizarre behavior on my desktop, that honestly just didn’t make sense. I spent about half an hour digging to discover what had gone wrong, and eventually determined, conclusively, that my problem was a single undetected flipped bit in RAM. I can’t prove whether the problem was due to cosmic rays, bad RAM, or something else, but in any case, I hope you find this story interesting and informative.
http://blog.ksplice.com/2010/06/attack-of-the-cosmic-rays/

448 HTML Ampersand Character Codes
These are character sequences that may appear in HTML documents; they represent sometimes useful symbols that are not part of the standard ASCII set or that would be difficult or impossible to type otherwise (e.g. the less-than sign, which would always be mistaken for the beginning of an HTML tag). Case is signinficant. The content of this table has been throughly tested. If the character that appears in the first column does not fit the description in the third column, your browser has a screw loose.
http://rabbit.eng.miami.edu/info/htmlchars.html

445 Doug Kaufman's Web Site - DOS ports LYNX
This site exists primarily to distribute DOS ports of programs in which I have taken an interest. This consists primarily of the text-mode web browser "lynx", the network file retrievers "wget" and "curl", the file compressor "bzip2" and the URL extractor "urlview". Running programs originally designed for unix in DOS is not necessarily easy. If you download these programs, please read the text files which explain how to set up these programs in DOS and which functional problems may be present. The latest DOS port of lynx is 2.8.5rel.1. You can download it here (2463576 bytes, 18 April 2004). This version is compiled with openssl-0.9.7d to give SSL support. This means that it can now access https:// URLs. This can now be distributed because of the easing of US export controls on encryption. Please note, however, that US regulations still prohibit export to Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, or Syria. Do not download the file if you are from any of these countries. Please check your own country's regulations on the use of strong cryptography before using or redistributing this file.
http://www.rahul.net/dkaufman/

440 A List Apart: Articles: Taking Advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 with Modernizr
Ten years ago, only the most cutting-edge web designers used CSS for layouts and styling. Browser support for CSS layouts was slim and buggy, so these people advocated for web standards adherence, while creating hacks that made CSS layouts work in all browsers. One hack that became widely used was browser sniffing: Detecting which browser and version the user had by looking at the navigator.userAgent property in JavaScript. Browser sniffing allowed for quick and easy code forking, allowing developers to target different browsers with different instructions. Today, CSS-based layouts are commonplace and every browser has pretty solid support for them. But now we have CSS3 and HTML5, and the situation is repeating itself—different browsers demonstrate varying levels of support for these new technologies. We’ve smartened up, however, and no longer employ CSS hacks nor use browser sniffing—an unreliable, poor practice. We’ve also convinced more and more clients that websites don’t need to look exactly the same in every browser. So how do we deal with this new but familiar problem? Simple: We use feature detection, which means that we do not ask the browser “who are you?” and make unreliable assumptions from there on. Instead we ask the browser, “can you do this and that?” It’s a simple way to test browser capabilities, but doing all these tests manually all the time gets tiresome. To solve that problem (and others), you can use Modernizr.
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/taking-advantage-of-html5-and-css3-with-modernizr/

433 The Beauty Of Typography: Writing Systems And Calligraphy, Part 2 - Smashing Magazine
The beauty of writing systems is that each has something unique from which to draw inspiration. Two weeks ago, in the first part of this article, we covered Arabic web design, magazine, html, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/22/the-beauty-of-typography-writing-systems-and-calligraphy-part-2/

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front … if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant Donnés, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

416 Welcome to the Modular Corner
Welcome to the Modular Corner! This site is intended as a resource for all users of the Pulsar / Scope Modular synth, a software synthesizer which comes with the Scope range of soundcards from Sonic Core (formerly Creamware). Here you will find information about the Modular Synth, it's various components, the many patches that are available for the Synth along with other related documents and links to do with all things Modular. On the Patches page, you will find information about individual patches that have been created for the Modular. This aims to be a complete listing of all the Modular patches that have become available, with a brief description of the patch. Where possible this will include a more detailed description, mp3 examples, signal flow diagrams, etc, in order to build up a more comprehensive 'manual' for the many patches that are available. The downloads page has other related resources, such as freeware modules, documents on modular synthesis, etc. Your contributions are vital - If you made a patch that you're proud of, or if you've downloaded someone else's that you like - let me know. I can't write up every patch on my own.
http://www.modularsynth.co.uk/index.html

404 FOLKTEK ARTS: Time Scape Wave Sequencer
A brand new masterwork by Arius Blaze. The "Time Scape Wave Sequencer" is a sampler, processor and synthesizer with a built in 8 step sequencer. The touch board controls the polyphonic synth part which can be fed through delay or any combination of thousands of possibilities for wave shaping as well as the possibility of having the shape altered in time with the sequencer.
http://folktek.blogspot.com/2009/11/time-scape-wave-sequencer.html

391 MPC1000 JJ OS
MPC1000 JJ OS1 Version 4.99 and JJ OS2XL It is the site which is making original OS of MPC1000. Sequencer,Sampler,MPC500,MPC5000,MPC2000XL,MPC2500,MV8800,nano PAD,ADSR,Synthesizer
http://www7a.biglobe.ne.jp/~mpc1000/

390 BestPractice, an open-source audio time-stretching tool for Windows
As a free audio time-stretch tool for Windows, BestPractice allows you to reduce or increase the speed with which audio plays, without affecting its tonal height. free,audio,time-stretch,time,stretch,windows,slow,speed,pitch-shift,shift,pitch,tune,guitar,riff,practice,rehearse,solo,play,music,mp3,CD,wave,wav,piano,sing,song
http://www.xs4all.nl/~mp2004/bp/

376 Foobar2000:Title Formatting Reference - Hydrogenaudio Knowledgebase
This article contains information about built-in titleformatting functions and field references with special meaning. References to documentation about fields and function which can only be used in specific components or which are provided by specific components can be found at the end of this article. A field reference is a field name enclosed in percent signs, for example %artist%. A function call starts with a dollar sign, followed by the function name and the parameter list. A parameter list can either be empty - denoted as () - or contain one or more parameters separated by commata, for example $abbr(%artist%). Note that there must be no whitespace between the dollar sign and the function name, or the function name and the opening parenthesis of the parameter list. Please see Title Formatting Introduction for a presentation of titleformat syntax in general. For details of the query syntax, which uses these fields, see: Query Syntax.
http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=Foobar2000:Titleformat_Reference

365 15 Best And Useful Websites For Graphic Designers
Graphic designing is always been a challenging part for designers as it is the most important part of any design project. So every designer try hard to make themselves strong in graphic designing. Fonts, Icons, Logos, Typography, Textures, Vectors etc. are the part of graphic designing. For any website designing, graphic designers always think about the logo design and choosing the right font to make any website graphically attractive and appealing. So, in this article, we are providing 15 best websites for graphic designer which are very useful for designers to take inspiration on different aspects of graphic designing.
http://resources.savedelete.com/15-best-and-useful-websites-for-graphic-designers.html

363 45 Photoshop Actions To Enhance Your Photos And Stand Out | Graphic and Web Design Blog
In this article you’re going to find 45 sets of actions that help you enhance the colors and the main look of the photo. photoshop,action,automate,photography,photo,enhance,tutorials Actions come really handy when you have a need to enhance your photos, but you just don’t have a time for it or necessary skills. Photoshop actions contain various adjustment layers, filters, effects, who are originally recorded by author and you can play them back again. You can create actions yourself or you can just download professional ones here and get amazing results with just once click! Explore how the action is built, choose which adjustments you want to apply and finally just enjoy great results. In this article you’re going to find 45 sets of actions that help you enhance the colors and change the main look of Your photo.
http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/tutorials/photoshop-actions-enhance-photos/

326 Random Apple Bashing thread Mac Sux
pouët.net - your online demoscene resource pouët.net,256b,1k,4k,40k,64k,cracktro,demo,dentro,diskmag,intro,invitation,lobster sex,musicdisk,Amiga AGA,Amiga ECS,Amiga PPC,Amstrad CPC,Atari ST,BeOS,Commodore 64,Falcon,MS-Dos,Linux,MacOS,Windows
http://pouet.net/topic.php?which=7132&page=1&x=7&y=9

303 View topic - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D
Instruments - Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:14 pm Post subject: Yamaha CS30 modifications ? help needed :D I've found this site: http://homepage.mac.com/s...ds_cs15mod.html I've made mod in my CS30 - faster LFO speed... anyway? I know circuit in cs30 is diffrent. anyway i was wonderin howto get 24db lopass? JarreYuri - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:05 pm I don't know... yet. But I just wanted to say that I would soooo much want to have that synth You have. Congratulations! Which version do You have? radek tymecki - Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:22 pm I had 3 versions: - Yamaha CS30L - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 6 or 8 steps - Yamaha CS30 with sequencer 1 to 8 steps sold first two
http://216.70.103.199/forum/printview.php?t=4294&start=0&sid=120d9a0ab733b5531ff4e0e0473aca14

252 Top 10 Sites To Make National And International Phone Calls For Free
When we talk about making phone calls from our PC through internet, we think of  instant messaging services like Yahoo Messenger and Google Talk which provides how to make free international phone calls, free international calls online, online free national and international calls, websites proving free phone calls ,resources,softwares
http://savedelete.com/top-10-websites-to-make-national-and-international-phone-calls-for-free.html

229 Typography Is Important - Well-Made Magazine - Techmic Studios
Typography is the art of arranging type and type design. The arrangement of type involves the selection of typefaces, point size, line length, line spacing, and the adjustment of spaces between groups of letters (tracking) and between pairs of letters (kerning). Typography comes from the Greek words typos, which means “mark, figure” and grapho, which means “I write.” It is basically the discipline of shaping written information; thus it can be applied to anything which has to do with text, including web design. Authors write the text, designers and typographers manage the typography, and users read through it.
http://www.techmic.com/magazine/issue-1/typography-is-important/

209 70+ Most Artistic and Creative Resumes Of All Time
When it comes to job hunting, the first thing which comes to our mind is a resume. And when we think of creating a resume, we mostly think of something that is most creative resumes, creative resumes of a designer, most creative and artistic resumes of all time, creative cv, creative portfolio,showcases,inspiration
http://resources.savedelete.com/70-most-artistic-and-creative-resumes-of-all-time.html

135 all - dj accessories - Turntablelab.com
we started the Lab in 1998, our first year out of college. Turntable Lab was established in 1998 by Anthony Cattarina, Jasper Goggins, and Peter Hahn. The trio formed the idea for the Lab based on numerous negative experiences at stores that sold dj equipment: both big musical instrument chains and shady Canal Street stereo stores. Turned off by haggling, uninformed salesmen, and questionable product, Turntable Lab built its business on fair pricing, informed reviews, and a well researched selection of “Lab approved” items. Most of the Lab's employees are working djs / producers / musicians, which helps to ensure this high standard. The business model was an immediate success, establishing rapid growth and a dedicated customer base. Turntable Lab soon applied their business model to other areas including recorded music, production equipment, clothing, and books. Each expansion has been met with success, and today Turntable Lab is a recognized tastemaker in all those areas. To bring the Turntable Lab experience directly to consumers, Turntable Lab opened its first retail location in 2001. In December of 2005, Turntable opened its flagship store in Hollywood, California. Currently the Turntable Lab headquarters is located in Brooklyn, New York.
http://www.turntablelab.com/dj_equipment/42/2204/

128 HybridReverb
HybridReverb2 is a convolution-based reverberation effect which combines the superior sound quality of a convolution reverb with the tuning capability of a feedback delay network. The sound quality of a convolution reverb depends on the quality of the used room impulse responses. HybridReverb2 comes with a set of room impulse responses which were synthesized with tinyAVE, an auralization software which was developed at the Institute of Communication Acoustics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Borß and Martin, 2009; Borß, 2009a). These room impulse responses are designed for a speaker setup with two front and two rear speakers (Borß, 2009b). For a full surround sound effect, you will need two plugins, one plugin which uses a "front" preset for the front channels and a second plugin which uses the corresponding "rear" preset for the rear channels.
http://www2.ika.rub.de/HybridReverb2/#download

100 Therapeutic Injections for Pain Management: eMedicine Clinical Procedures
Overview: This article focuses on the use of therapeutic injections to treat acute and chronic pain syndromes. Discussion of this topic begins with an overview of regional anesthesia, which includes the pharmacology of frequently administered medications and basic ... nerve blocks, technique; nerve blocks, rationale; nerve blocks, complications; local anesthetics; injection, pain treatment; chronic pain disorders; therapeutic injections for pain management; acute pain syndromes; chronic pain syndromes; regional anesthesia; pain disorders; therapeutic blocks; sympathetic blocks; diagnostic blocks; prognostic blocks; prophylactic blocks; pain management techniques
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1143675-overview

78 Mandelbulb: The Unravelling of the Real 3D Mandelbrot Fractal
TIMESTAMP 08/11/2009. The original Mandelbrot is an amazing object that has captured the public's imagination for 30 years with its cascading patterns and hypnotically colourful detail. It's known as a 'fractal' - a type of shape that yields (sometimes elaborate) detail forever, no matter how far you 'zoom' into it (think of the trunk of a tree sprouting branches, which in turn split off into smaller branches, which themselves yield twigs etc.).
http://www.skytopia.com/project/fractal/mandelbulb.html

67 The Audio Playground Synthesizer Museum
The Audio Playground webpages offer a virtual tour of the collection and shows some of the the electronic instruments and gadgets which have shaped popular (and not so popular) music through the years -- from the earliest innovations, to more recent toys. Enjoy!
http://www.keyboardmuseum.com/play.html

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