100SILEX, de 0 à 100 s: years
1466 The ‘Groupe de Recherches Musicales’ Pierre Schaeffer, Pierre Henry & Jacques Poullin, France 1951 | 120 Years of Electronic Music

http://120years.net/wordpress/the-grm-group-and-rtf-electronic-music-studio-pierre-schaeffer-jacques-poullin-france-1951/

1418 70 years after ww2, pictures made by my forest ranger friend! (Poland) - Imgur
images, funny pictures, image host, image upload, image sharing, image resize
http://imgur.com/gallery/FRPf8

1414 Synth Spectacular- 50 Years of Buchla - Digital One - Portland, OR
New Forms Festival, Don Buchla, Modular, Synthesizer, analog, hardware, digital one
http://digone.com/synth-spectacular-buchla/

1408 » Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Animodule.com
Cut simple SMT Stencil from common aluminum flashing on your CNC Here’s a quick photodoc of how I made a reusable SMT stencil from some aluminum siding I had laying around. It’s very simple to assemble and works great. Dirt cheap too. I had picked up a roll of aluminum flashing a few years ago to flash some chimneys I rebuilt/repointed and was curious to see how it would hold up as an SMT stencil. To buy an SMT stencil frame is near $1000 so I didn’t have much to lose if it didn’t work out. I cut the frame out of some birch plywood since I had some handy. Really any sturdy frame would do the trick. You could easily glue one together out of some 1x or trim board. I put a thicker sheet of aluminum down underneath the flashing to give the CNC endmill something sturdy to cut against and clamped it down stretched and tight. My thought there was that If I cut straight on the MDF it might push on the flashing and bend it before it cut through. A 1mm endmill did the trick. Each pass was .05mm deep. I pulled the Flashing tight and stapled it to the frame. No rocket science here. I taped up the inside edges so no solderpaste could squeeze between the frame and the stencil. I had some old screen print hinge boards so I just attached this frame the same way I would a screen print stencil. The only fiddly part was aligning the first PCB. You have to push around a little and lift the stencil and fiddle with it a little bit. Once I get all the pads lined up correctly I hold it in place and trace around it with a thin tip sharpie marker. Then you place the PCB in the outline. If you have the height adjusted correctly the stencil is sturdy enough to hold the PCB in place while you print the Solderpaste on it. just hold the stencil frame down and it pushes down on the PCB. I used a flexible putty knife as a squeegee. It worked fine. Cleanup was a breeze. Just scrape it off, unscrew the stencil frame from the hingeboard and stick it in the corner till you are ready to do another run.
http://www.animodule.com/diy-2/cut-simple-smt-stencil-from-common-aluminum-flashing-on-your-cnc/

1386 Retro Synth Ads: Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88, Keyboard 1982
Sound Master Memory Rhythm SR-88 drum machine 1-page advertisement from page 67 in Keyboard Magazine August 1982. Hmmm. Not sure how I feel about this ad. There just seems to be a lot going on. For example, am I supposed to know who "The Rhythm Section" is? The fact that they include themselves in an already long ad title suggests they must be some kind of a big deal. And then you find their name again in the bottom left-hand corner: "The SR-88. Another innovative product from The Rhythm Section by Sound Master Distributed exclusively by JTG of Nashville." So, let me get this straight. JTG of Nashville is the distributor of the SR-88 which was created by The Rhythm Section which is somehow owned or operated by Sound Master. That is waaaaay to much information. Sounds like something political is going on there, and readers unfortunately get stuck in the middle of it. There also seems to be a lot of ad-copy which actually doesn t give me much information. Reason #4 gives readers the most info including instant stop/start, variable tone and output switches, and a write/play mode indicator. The most I glean out of the four other reasons put together is: 16 rhythms, clock pulse and a price of under $200. The actual specs that are probably most important to potential buyers are inexplicably shoved into the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily for me, there are a few resources on the Web with more information about this beast. Unluckily for blog readers, as soon as I started looking for more info, I got swept up in a certain SR-88/Boss DR-55 controversy. Comparing the SR-88 and Boss DR-55 One of the first Web sites I hit while looking for info on the SR-88 was Dubsounds.com. The site includes a great little write-up on the SR-88, but, more interesting was finding out about a little controversy about whether the SR-88 or the very similar Boss DR-55 came out first. The two do seem mighty similar in functionality. For comparison purposes, I did a quick search on MATRIXSYNTH to find more photos. . A great photo of a gray SR-88 can be found in this December 2005 SR-88 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the less common, but definitely more cool, blue SR-88 can be seen in this January 2011 MATRIXSYNTH auction post. Comparing the two to the Amdek RMK-100 Interestingly, it s not just these two machines that look and function similarly. In this May 2009 MATRIXSYNTH SR-88 auction post commenter "PAC" notices: "Interesting. I have an Amdek RMK-100 (sold as kit), very similar!" Never heard of it, so I Googled "Amdek RMK-100" to see just how similar it was to both the DR-55 and the SR-88. Turns out (according to the Internet) that Amdek products were made by Boss/Roland back in 80s, and, not only that, but that the RMK-100 is actually the kit version of the Boss DR-55. Makes sense on why it would also be similar to the SR-88. I found an ebay auction for an Amdek RMK-100 going on right now with a great photo of the front panel (see below), and indeed it does share a lot with the DR-55 and SR-88 - but definitely not identical to either one. For example, it looks like the Amdek and SR-88 share a similar filler function that as far as I can tell is not available on the DR-55. And the DR-55 and the RMK-100 share a similar accent function that I don t see on the SR-88. Now where does the Electro Dynamics Corporation Programmable Rhythm SR-99 fit in? I also came across another machine with similar features - the Programmable Rhythm SR-99. No - not manufactured by Sound Master, but by Electro Dynamics Corporation. And, it too resembles the others in functionality, and especially the SR-88 in design also. I ve included a row of photos below to help make the comparison between the two. The SR-88 photo is from the 2005 MATRIXSYNTH auction post and the EDC SR-99 photo is from the excellent BigBlueWave.co.uk site. I ve also thrown in a photo from another recent E-bay listing that included both - plus boxes and manuals! Sick! Obviously, Sound Master and EDC are somehow connected, although I can t find any info on the Internet concerning these two companies. I do know that they were both advertising separately in Keyboard Magazine in late 1983, making it unlikely that one of the companies changed their name to the other. Anyone know anything? And then there is the Clef Master Rhythm... Now, I m going to throw in a late entry. It s Sunday night, and I just came across this August 2010 MATRIXSYNTH auction post for the Clef Master Rhythm. It not only shares part of the name of one of the other units ("Master"), it too has many features of the other rhythm machines, and identical innards as the DR-55, but is expanded to include even more sounds: "This is essentially a fully expanded Boss DR-55 feature-wise and tone-wise. The circuits are identical (schematically and tonally) to the Boss DR-55, but the Clef Master Rhythm gives you way more instruments than the Boss DR-55..." Interestingly, according to the post, it pre-dates the Boss DR-55 - and also came in a kit form like the Amdek. "The Clef Master Rhythm came out a little before the Boss DR-55 in late 1979/early 1980. It was sold in two versions and available in greater quantities in Europe than in the United States. One version was a kit that the user put together and another one was a prebuilt machine." A photo from the MATRIXSYNTH post really helps show the similarities in functions with the others: What does it all mean? So, looking at all five machines, its almost like there was a rhythm machine salad bar of some sort in Japan, and each company stepped up to it and picked out which features they wanted to include in their product. And that begs the question - since we know there was a kit form available and there are claims that the Clef Master even has the same circuits as the DR-55, could all five products (and probably others) have used the exact same internal parts - each company choosing which features to include and then customizing in their respective rhythm machine? And if so, were those parts supplied by Amdek, or did all five get their internal parts from some other manufacturer? And if that is the case, then the question of whether the SR-88 or DR-55 came first doesn t really matter much, since it is likely that the kit components would have been available first. Plus, we have that one auction post with the claim that the Clef Master came out before the DR-55 - making it all even more confusing to figure out. Or, am I totally off the mark on all this? Were they all created separately? Maybe I ve just been fixated on this a little too much... I ll keep on looking for more info on these companies and any connection they might have, but if anyone want to buy all four and open them up to take a look - it would be muchly appreciated. :D Posted by RetroSynthAds at 12:05 PM Labels: 1982, amdek, clef master, dr-55, drum machine, electro dynamics corporation, keyboard magazine, rmk-100, Sound Master, sr-88, sr-99 2 comments: Simon said... Here s a funny thing - I seem to remember Clef in the early 1980s as a British company that made electronic pianos (touch-sensitive ones!) in kit form. Deep in the back of my mind I recall seeing them at a music fair in London with a couple of their pianos and some drum machines including a prototype drum/bass/chord sequencer called something like a "Band-Box". But it WAS a long time ago. February 12, 2012 at 12:36 PM Simon said... Looks like (for once) my memory didn t fail me. Here is a 1982 ad for Clef Electronics showing all the products I mentioned, plus a natty-looking little monosynth! BTW, I owned an EDC SR99 drum machine in the mid-1980s, but replaced it with a Yamaha RX-21 a couple of years later. February 12, 2012 at 12:46 PM
http://retrosynthads.blogspot.fr/2011/08/sound-master-memory-rhythm-sr-88.html

1306 Cern
Twenty years of a free, open web On 30 April 1993 CERN published a statement that made World Wide Web technology available on a royalty free basis, allowing the web to flourish On 30 April 1993 CERN published a statement that made World Wide Web ("W3", or simply "the web") technology available on a royalty-free basis. By making the software required to run a web server freely available, along with a basic browser and a library of code, the web was allowed to flourish.
http://info.cern.ch/

1256 Sony | Vintage Electronics Have Soul – The Pocket Calculator Show Website
We owe much gratitude to Sony, for they were responsible for making the personal stereo cassette player a reality. For over 25 years, Sony has been bringing a personal, portable stereo music experience to our ears–creativity and innovation have continued to make Walkman a useful product to everyone. Walkman has reached pop icon status and become a symbol of youth, individuality and freedom. In 1979 Sony warned, “Remember the name: Walkman.” How could we forget?
http://pocketcalculatorshow.com/walkman/sony/

1193 WM-D6C sony walkman central
Walkman Central is independent, and has no connection with Sony. Our aim is to provide details and commentary on a variety of Walkman products produced by Sony over the years. We don't just cover personal stereos: CD players and TVs are included too, as well as a few earlier products that contributed to the development of the original Walkman.
http://www.walkmancentral.com/products/wm-d6c

1183 Electronic Musical Instrument 1870 - 1990
electronic music content
http://120years.net/

1171 headphone audio
Read Reviews, Get Advice, and Buy with Confidence from the Experts of 20 years. HeadRoom, headphones, headphone amp, headphone amplifier, AirHead, BlockHead, sennheiser, grado, etymotic research, beyerdynamic, koss, akg, shure
http://www.headphone.com/index.php

1050 Frieze Magazine | Comment | Conrad Schnitzler
In the early 1960s, Conrad Schnitzler met Joseph Beuys in a bar in DĂŒsseldorf. Beuys was at the start of his legendary run as a professor of ‘monumental sculpture’ at DĂŒsseldorf’s Kunstakademie. Schnitzler was a sailor, who specialized in fixing the engines of merchant ships in nearby ports. Beuys took a liking to Schnitzler, inviting him to be one of his students. Schnitzler enrolled at the Kunstakademie, but dropped out a year or two later, much to Beuys’ dismay. If, as Beuys famously entreated, ‘everybody is an artist’, why did he have to go to school to be one? Schnitzler travelled for a few years, making metal sculptures and performance art. Then he took the metal sculptures he built during his time with Beuys, which he had covered in stark planes of black and white paint, dragged them all to a grassy field, and left them there.
http://www.frieze.com/comment/article/conrad-schnitzler/

1033 "I'm a technical lead on the Google+ team. Ask me anything."
I helped design and build a lot of the circles model and sharing UI for Google+. I was recruited to Google to work on "getting social right" in early 2010. Prior to that, I was CTO of Plaxo, and also its first employee (since March 2002). I've also spent many years working on open standards for the social web (OpenID, OAuth, Portable Contacts, WebFinger, etc.) Since I work for a big/public company (albeit a pretty cool one), I can't provide specific stats, dates for future features, or details of confidential code/algorithms. But I will do my best to be "refreshingly frank" about everything else. :)
http://anyasq.com/79-im-a-technical-lead-on-the-google+-team%20%20%20%20--

958 Electronic Musical Instrument 1870 - 1990
electronic music content
http://120years.net/machines/dynaphone/index.html

957 Electronic Musical Instrument 1870 - 1990
electronic music content
http://120years.net/machines/hellertione/index.html

946 docs synth
- 360 SYSTEMS DIGITAL KEYBOARD brochure / prix / pub 1983 - 360 SYSTEMS MIDI BASS user manual - ACCESS VIRUS catalogue été 2004 - ACCESS VIRUS user manual - ACCESS VIRUS OS4 user manual - ACCESS VIRUS TI brochure 2004 - ACCESS VIRUS TI user manual os1.0 - ALESIS HR 16-MMT 8 brochure - ALESIS HR 16-16B-MMT8 user manual - ALESIS HR16-MMT8 banc essai disc international avril 1988 - ALESIS HR16-MMT8 pub numéra - VOCODER X-32 user manual / sons - XPASS FILTER user manual - SEMblance banc essai keyboards allemagne 2004 - SEMblance user manual - FilteredCOFFEE user manual - DROID 3 brochure - VOSTOK user manual - VOSTOK test electronic musician février 2003 - VOSTOK test keys allemagne - VOSTOK keyboard japon mai 2003 - AKAI AX73 brochure (avril 1986) - AKAI AX80 banc essai sono - AKAI AX80 brochure - AKAI EVI 1000 user manual - AKAI EWI 1000-EVI 1000-EVW 2000 banc essai sono - AKAI EWI 3020 user manual - AKAI EWI 3030m user manual - AKAI ME série banc essai sono (10D 15F, 20A) - AKAI ME série banc essai guitare claviers janvier 1986 (10D, 15F, 20A) - AKAI ME série brochure (juin 1985) - AKAI ME20A user manual - AKAI ME25S brochure - AKAI ME30P user manual - AKAI ME30P brochure - AKAI ME30PII user manual - AKAI MX73 brochure - AKAI S612 brochure - AKAI S612 banc essai sono - AKAI S900 banc essai sono - AKAI S900 brochure (avril 1986) - AKAI S900 carte marion system - import numéra - AKAI S1000 banc essai sono - AKAI S1100 user manual - AKAI SG01P user manual - AKAI SG01V user manual - AKAI U4 phrase trainer brochure - AKAI VX90 brochure (avril 1986) - AKAI VX90 banc essai sono - AKAI XR 10 brochure - AKAI PEQ6 - MB76 banc essai sono - AKAI pub - AKAI catalogue gamme 86 - ARP AVATAR brochure publicitaire / modulaire façon 2600 / - ARP AXXE banc essai disc international / pub keyboards 1976 / pub keyboards 1977 - ARP CENTAUR article disc international 1978 - ARP CHROMA brochure publicitaire - ARP EXPLORER service manual / patch book - ARP ODYSSEY banc essai sono / brochure / pub keyboards 1975 / pub1 - ARP OMNI pub disc 1976 / pub omni 2 1979 / voir atelier chok - ARP POLARIS brochure - ARP PRELUDE pub 1983 - ARP PRODGX banc essai sono - ARP QUADRA banc essai sono / pub - ARP QUARTET service manual / pub - ARP LITTLE BROTHER 2950 schematics - ARP PIANO 16 voies pub - ARP SEQUENCER pub 1976 - ARP SOLUS banc essai Claviers septembre 1981 / pub Keyboards 1980 - ARP WING I et II modulaire - ARP catalogue gamme / pub gamme 1977 - ARP catalogue gamme & accessoires - ARP retro family tree - future music - The rise and fall of ARP instruments keyboards avril 1983 ARP AVATAR ARP OMNI EMS VOCODER 5000 MP3 MP3 MP3 pub envoi des 2 flexi disc - BANANA brochure - BALDWIN 88 (KUSTOM) electronique piano brochure - BOHM digidrums banc essai disc international décembre 1983 - BOHM digidrums pub1 / pub2 - BOHM soundlab user manual - BOHM soundlab service manual - BOHM soundlab pub - BOSS DR55 user manual+ tips / banc essai sono / service manual - BOSS DR110 banc essai guitares claviers mai 1984 - BOSS catalogue Micro studio série - BOSS banc essai sono sur 8 pédales - CASIO 401 banc essai claviers aout 1981 / pub fiche technique / - CASIO 701 pub janvier 1982 - CASIO 1000P pub 1983 - CASIO CZ101 pub - CASIO CZ1000 banc essai guitares claviers décembre 1985 - CASIO DH 100 user manual - CASIO DH 500 service manual - CASIO FZ1 user manual / banc essai disc international mai 1987 / pub - CASIO MT40 pub mai 1982 - CASIO PT30 banc essai sono juillet 1983 - CASIOTONE VL1 banc essai disc international juillet 1981 / pub 1 / pub 2 / mod - CASIO VZ1 user & service manual - CASIO VZ1 banc essai disc international janvier 1989 - CASIO VZ1 pub disc international janvier 1989 - CASIO pub gamme 201 à 401/MT30&40 1981 - CASIO catalogue gamme COUVERTURES (cliquer pour agrandir) - DJET 004 banc essai disc international decembre 1979 - EXAGONE XM 64 banc essai disc international - EXAGONE 64 pub - REGGY synthétiseur de percussions banc essai sono - CHEETAH pub distribution music land - CHEETAH MS6 user manual - CREAMWARE B4000 user manual - CREAMWARE MINIMAX user manual - CREAMWARE PRO12 user manual - CREAMWARE PRODYSSEY user manual - CREAMWARE MINMAX/PROFIT5 brochure - BIT99 user manual - BIT99 brochure - BIT99 pub / banc essai sono 01 - BIT99 / BIT01 banc essai sono 2 - BIT01 voices and midi - BIT MASTERKEYBOARD user manual - BIT01 & MASTERKEYBOARD sous UNIQUE DBM test keyboards decembre 1986 - BIT variantes BIT/LEM/UNIQUE - CRUMAR BABY GRAND pub - CRUMAR MULTIMAN brochure - CRUMAR MULTIMAN schematics - CRUMAR MULTIMAN ORCHESTRATOR pub - CRUMAR PERFORMER service manual - CRUMAR série T pub - CRUMAR T3 banc essai claviers février 1982 - CRUMAR TRILOGY STRATUS pub CASIOTONE 202 CASIOTONE 301 MATTEL SYNSONICS DRUMS YAMAHA SY77 MP3 MP3 MP3 MP3 MP3 - POLYEVOLVER rack banc essai recording musicien septembre 2004 - DOEPFER MAQ 16/3 banc essai sono - DOEPFER MCV1-MCV8 user manual - DREAM SAM XR pub 1989 / banc essai disc international 1989 - DYNACORD ADS / ADS K brochure - DYNACORD DRS 78 banc essai sono - DYNACORD DC 200 leslie brochure / pub 1976 - DYNACORD EMINENT 100A user manual - DYNACORD EMINENT 100A service manual - DYNACORD SRV 66 vocoder user manual / schematics / MP3 demo - DYNACORD catalogue drum computer - SYNERGY banc essai sono - SYNERGY digital keyboards brochure - SYNERGY I & II+ test keyboard US COUVERTURES (cliquer pour agrandir) - ELECTRO HARMONIX DIGITAL LOOPING RECORDER 64 Sec - ELECTRO HARMONIX EH300 VOCODER manual / schematics - ELECTRO HARMONIX HARMONIC OCTAVE GENERATOR user manual - ELECTRO HARMONIX MICRO SYNTHESIZER user manual / schematics - ELECTRO HARMONIX 8 pédales d'effets au banc d'essai - sono - ELKA EK22 / EM22 user manual - ELKA SYNTHEX banc essai sono / brochure / pub 1983 - ELKA 610 pub Keyboards 1975 / pub keyboards 1978 - ELKA MICROPIANO 16 brochure / pub 1983 - ELKA OMB5 pub - ELKA OMB3 C92 X35 user manual - ELKA SOLIST 505 pub 1978 - ELKA X50 banc essai claviers mars 1982 - ELKA X50/TWIN 51 pub - ELKA X50 & 61P banc essai sono janvier 1982 - ELKA pub gamme - EMS SYNTHI E banc essai sono - EMS SYNTHI AKS banc essai disc international juillet-aout 1977 - VCS 3 / AKS article keyboard US novembre 1990 - AKS / VCS3 / Keyboard DK1/KS brochure - EMS SYNTHI HI-FLI brochure - EMS SYNTHI HI-FLI tarifs février 1977 revendeurs Gamme - EMS VOCODER 2000 banc essai disc international mai 1979 - EMS tarifs gamme janvier 1976 electrone / piano center - ENSONIQ ASR user manual - ENSONIQ ASR X user manual - ENSONIQ ASR pro keyboards juillet 1999 - ENSONIQ EPS banc essai sono - ENSONIQ EPS 16 plus user manual - ENSONIQ ESQ1 pub - ENSONIQ ESQM brochure - ENSONIQ MIRAGE pub / article sono - ENSONIQ SPM1 brochure - ENSONIQ SQ2 banc essai sono - ENSONIQ SQ80 banc essai sono - ENSONIQ SQ88 reportage de EPS16 jusqu'au SQ80 keyboards - ENSONIQ TS10-12 brochure - ENSONIQ VFX banc essai keyboards aout 1989 / article disc international octobre 1989 - ENSONIQ VFX SD banc essai disc international decembre 1989 - FARFISA POLYCHROME banc essai claviers janvier 1983 - FARFISA SOUNDMAKER service manual - FARFISA SYNTHORCHESTRA service manual - FARFISA PRO 110 pub1 / pub2 / banc essai disc international mai 1979 - FARFISA VIP 255 brochure - FARFISA VIP 345 brochure / service manual - FARFISA VIP 400 brochure - FARFISA MINI COMPACT user manual / service manual COUVERTURES (cliquer pour agrandir) - RHODES 54 notes pub - RHODES 54 banc essai sono - RHODES 73 & 88 notes catalogue - RHODES Mark catalogue - RHODES extrait catalogue 1976 - RHODES electronic piano brochure / pub keyboards 1983 - RHODES pub herbie hancock - RHODES pub disc international - RHODES MK80/60 brochure - ORGACOR Fratelli Crosio pub 1979 - ORGACOR PROHONIC SYNTHE pub (1982) / pub 1979 - DOCTOR CLICK user manual - DOCTOR CLICK 2, MULTI TRIGGER, DRUM DOCTOR, MASTERBEAT extrait catalogue Music Land - DOCTOR CLICK pub keyboards novembre 1983 - DOCTOR CLICK banc essai keyboards 1983 - MINI DOC, CLOCK DELAY, DOCTOR FLICK, MODULATOR extrait catalogue Music Land - NANO SERIES pub 1983 - GEM SPRINTER 61 & 49 pub - banc essai - GEM orgue série F30 à F50 pub 1976 - GEM orgue gamme portable (rodéo 61, phantom 61) et meuble (H600, X365, wizard 320) pub - GEM orgue gamme portable (sprinter 49 & 61) et meuble (H2000, wizard 315 & 321) pub - IBANEZ mixer RM60 pub (catalogue oscar music) - IBANEZ AD202 banc essai sono - IBANEZ DM1000 pub 1983 / - IBANEZ gamme pédale effets 1981 pub - JEN caroussel C390 banc essai disc décembre 1978 (orgue incluant JEN SX2000) - JEN string machine 2007 banc essai sono - JEN sx1000 brochure - JEN sx2000 banc essai sono / test + pub disc international / user manual / patch vide et preset - HAMMOND catalogue gamme 01 - HAMMOND catalogue gamme 02 - HH P73 piano électrique banc essai claviers octobre 1981 - HH P73 pub disc international 1981 - HELPINSTILL piano électro-accoustique banc essai claviers 1981 - HELPINSTILL piano électro-accoustique pub - HOHNER PIANET test disc international juillet aout 1977 - HOHNER C86 user manual - HOHNER C86 service manual - HOHNER C86 banc essai claviers janvier 1982 - HOHNER CLAVINET D6 banc essai sono - HOHNER MELODICA SOPRANO user manual - HOHNER MULTIMONICA user manual - HOHNER orgue soufflerie organa mélodica catalogue Millet - HOHNER extrait gamme 1975 / 1977 - JMS CGX interface midi in cv/gate - import numéra - JMS midi master synchronizer - import numéra - KAWAI 100 F banc essai sono - KAWAI 100 F brochure - KAWAI 100F notes disc international - KAWAI 100F schematics - KAWAI 100F user manual and patchs - KAWAI 100F user manual in français - KAWAI GB1 user manual - KAWAI GB2 user manual / rythm pattern - KAWAI K1 banc essai guitares claviers juillet 1988 / pub 1989 / brochure - KAWAI K4 banc essai keyboards novembre 1989 - KAWAI K5 brochure / sound library - KAWAI SPECTRA KC10 user manual - KAWAI MAV8 user manual - KAWAI MM16 user manual - KAWAI MX16 user manual - KAWAI MX8R user manual - KAWAI R100 service manual / brochure / banc essai disc international - KAWAI SX210 banc essai sono / brochure / pub keyboards 1983 / pub disc 1983 - KAWAI série EP 308/308S/608 pub1 1983 / pub2 1983 - KAWAI EP608 user manual/schematics / brochure - KAWAI EP308/308S user manual - KAWAI ORGAN E550/650 service manual - KORG 700S user manual - KORG 900S banc essai sono - KORG A3 banc essai disc international aout 1989 - KORG BX3 pub1 / pub2 - KORG CX3 banc essai claviers aout 1981 / pub 1981 - KORG DS8 brochure - KORG EPS1 banc essai sono - KORG EX800 user manual - KORG EX800/RK100 brochure - KORG KMX 8/MM 25 brochure 1983 - KORG KPR77 banc essai disc international décembre 1983 - KORG MICROPRESET M500 user manual+service manual / patches - KORG MICROPRESET M500 banc essai sono - KORG MONOPOLY - POLYSIX brochure - KORG MONOPOLY banc essai sono / settings - KORG MONOTRON schematics - KORG MS 20/ SQ 10 - YAMAHA CS 30 match synthétiseurs disc international décembre 1978 - KORG POLY 800 user manual francais / banc essai sono - KORG POLYSIX banc essai disc international aout 1982 - KORG PSS50 banc essai guitares claviers février 1985 + modif - KORG TRIDENT banc essai sono mag - KORG mr multi user manual - KORG EPS1 banc essai sono - KORG SDD300 pub 1983 - KORG SYGMA banc essai disc international septembre 1979 - KORG SYGMA user manual - KORG SYGMA korg magazine winter 2002 - KORG VC10 banc essai disc international mai 1979 - KORG X911 pages annotées d'Eric.G pour modularisation du X911 / voir son site - KORG catalogue gamme 1981 - KORG catalogue gamme 1982 - KORG article disc international arrivée série ms Francfort Synthesizer Bionic Orchestra - Francis rimbert Joop Stokkermans - The Magic of the ARP-Synthesizer MP3 - KURZWEIL 250 banc essai claviers octobre 1984 - LINN 9000 pub keyboards juillet 1985 - LINNDRUM pub keyboards juin 1983 - MATTEL SYNSONICS DRUMS user manual francais + plan accessory jack - MATTEL SYNSONICS DRUMS pub keyboards 1983 - MATTEL MAGICAL MUSICAL THING user manual - M-AUDIO AXIOM user manual - MDB sortie polyséquenceur 1981 - MDB TRIGGTOM 4 extrait catalogue music land - MDB WINDOW RECORDER extrait catalogue music land - POLY-MIDI brochure - POLY-MIDI vs YAMAHA QX7 banc essai guitares claviers septembre 1985 - S2000 séquenceur monophonique brochure - SUPERBAT brochure - MICROPERFORMANCE encart pub disc international - MOOG constellation brochure - MOOG memorymoog brochure - MOOG micromoog notes disc international - MOOG le minimoog de 1998 pub - MOOG polymoog brochure 1 / brochure 2 - MOOG polymoog pub annonce disc international - MOOG PRODIGY banc essai disc international juin 1980 - MOOG PRODIGY brochure - MOOG SONIC 6 brochure 1974 - MOOG pub1 1979 / - MOOG prix 1979 - MOOG catalogue - MOOG CATALOGUE 1973 - ENCYCLOPEDIA of MOOG ARTISTS - MXR 15-21 equalizer brochure - MXR time delay command banc essai disc international aout 1982 - MXR pub gamme effets 1979 / pub 1982 - NOVATION A STATION brochure - NOVATION BASS STATION brochure - NOVATION DRUM STATION brochure - NOVATION KS4-KS5-KS6 brochure - NOVATION KS4-KS5 user manual - NOVATION K-STATION brochure - NOVATION SUPERNOVA banc essai keyboards novembre 1998 - NOVATION SUPERNOVA 2 brochure - NOVATION X STATION REMOTE brochure - NOVATION Xio synth brochure - OBERHEIM MATRIX 6 banc essai sono / brochure - OBERHEIM DMX banc essai sono juillet 1983 / brochure - OBERHEIM DPX1 brochure 1897 - OBERHEIM DSX brochure / pub 1981 - OBERHEIM DX brochure 1986 - OBERHEIM MATRIX 6 banc essai sono / brochure - OBERHEIM MATRIX 12 banc essai sono / brochure / banc essai keyboards juillet 1985 - OBERHEIM MATRIX 1000 patches 1 / schematics / patchesbook 2 - OBERHEIM OB-X pub (piano center) - OBERHEIM OB-Xa banc essai claviers mai 1981 - OBERHEIM OB-1 brochure / pub 1978 - OBERHEIM OB-8 banc essai keyboards 1983 avec DMX & DSX - OBERHEIM PROMMER banc essai sono / brochure - OBERHEIM STRETCH brochure 1987 - OBERHEIM pub gamme mars 1986 / pub 1984 - OBERHEIM prix Numéra 1985 / article retro family tree-future music OSCAR oxford - OSCAR banc essai sono - OSCAR pub - OSCAR extrait catalogue Music Land - OSC ADVANCED SOUND GENERATOR extrait catalogue Music land - OSC ADVANCED SOUND GENERATOR guitare de "commande" SYNTHAXE - voir sur le site de jbfairlight - PPG PRK brochure - PPG WALDORF retro family tree article future music - PPG prices list numéra 1985 - PPG WAVE II banc essai claviers novembre 1981 / article disc international - PPG pub 1 1984 / pub 2 1984 / pub 3 1984 - QUASIMIDI SIRIUS banc essai keyboards janvier 1999 - QUASIMIDI RAVEOLUTION 909 banc essai keyboards décembre 1997 - ROLAND A880 banc essai sono - ROLAND CR78 banc essai sono - ROLAND CR1000 pub 1987 - ROLAND DDR 30-PD10-PD20 brochure 1985 - ROLAND GR300 banc essai sono - ROLAND GR700 banc essai claviers 1985 - ROLAND GR700 user manual - ROLAND G707 guitar controller user manual - ROLAND JUNO 6 banc essai sono - ROLAND JUNO 106 banc essai sono - ROLAND JUPITER 4 banc essai disc international janvier 1979 - ROLAND JUPITER 6 banc essai sono - ROLAND JUPITER 8 banc essai sono - ROLAND JX3P banc essai sono - ROLAND JX8P banc essai sono - ROLAND MC202 banc essai sono - ROLAND MP600 banc essai claviers novembre 1981 - ROLAND MP700 banc essai sono + pub - ROLAND OCTAPAD pad 8 controller brochure 1985 - ROLAND PIANO PLUS 11 banc essai disc international aout 1982 - ROLAND REVO 250 / 120 pub - ROLAND SDE 2000 banc essai sono mai 1982 - ROLAND SDE 2500 banc essai sono - ROLAND SH101 banc essai sono - ROLAND SH3A banc essai disc international mai 1977 - ROLAND SDP11 brochure 1993 - ROLAND SUPER JX banc essai sono - ROLAND SVC 350 banc essai sono - ROLAND TB303 banc essai sono / pub 1983 - ROLAND TR505 banc essai sono - ROLAND TR707 banc essai sono - ROLAND TR808 banc essai sono / pub 1981 - ROLAND TR909 banc essai sono - ROLAND TL12 brochure 1986 - ROLAND VP 330 banc essai disc international juin 1980 - ROLAND pub / pub gamme 1977 - ROLAND catalogue gamme 1981 - ROLAND catalogue volume 5 mai 1984 - ROLAND catalogue news été 1986 - DRUMTRACKS banc essai sono - DRUMTRACKS brochure - DRUMTRACKS banc essai guitare claviers (basse res) - PRO ONE banc essai claviers décembre 1981 - PRO ONE banc essai sono - PRO ONE brochure - PROPHET 5 banc essai sono - PROPHET 5 banc essai disc international mai 1979 - PROPHET 5 brochure - PROPHET 5 pub "devenez revendeur" disc international 1981 - PROPHET 600 banc essai sono - PROPHET 600 brochure - PROPHET T8 banc essai sono - PROPHET T8 brochure - PROPHET T8 user manual (seulement chapitre 7 midi) - PROPHET 10 pub - PROPHET VS brochure - SIXTRAK banc essai guitares claviers mai 1984 - SIXTRAK banc essai sono - SIXTRAK brochure - MODEL 700 programmer brochure - MODEL 800 sequenceur user manual - POLYSEQUENCEUR pub keyboards juin 1983 - PROPHET 2000 brochure - PROPHET 2000 user manual - SPLIT EIGHT user manual - PRELUDE pub - PIANO FORTE pub - SEQUENTIAL TRAKS music system brochure distribution music - SEQUENTIAL pub 1984 / pub 1982 - SEQUENTIAL prix gamme (1981/1984) - SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS brochure gamme (basse res) - SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS brochure gamme inclus PRO-FX - SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS catalogue wine country novembre 1994 - SIEL OPERA 6 banc essai sono - SIEL OPERA 6 brochure - SIEL CRUISE user manual - SIEL DK600/EXP600 pub - SIEL MK900 pub keyboards novembre 1984 - SIEL pub disc international 1981 - CLAVIOLINE SELMER livret accompagnement de l'appareil - SELMER PIANOTRON / ORGUE CAPRI brochure - SIMONS SILICON MALLET reportage disc international 1987 - SIMMONS MTX9 banc essai disc international avril 1987 / user manual - SIMMONS SDSV banc essai claviers décembre 1981 - SOLTON live series pub 1988 - SOLTON ARRANGER PLUS pub 1987 - SOLTON MS40 user manual - SOLTON MS 50/60 user manual - SOLTON orgue synthé P500 C pub - STYLOPHONE DUBREQ user manual 1+ boite - STYLOPHONE DUBREQ user manual 2 + boite/vinyl - STYLOPHONE 350S PUB SYNTON - SYRINX banc essai sono - SYRINX patch sheet - SYRINX brochure - SYNTOVOX SPX216 extrait catalogue music land - SYNTOVOX 222 banc essai disc international décembre 1979 - SYNTECHNO TEEBEE mark1 user manual (3.1) - TEISCO S60F banc essai claviers octobre 1981 / banc essai sono - TEISCO S60F & S110F banc essai disc international juillet 1981 / pub disc international 1981 - TEISCO brochure gamme - VOX catalogue incluant Electronic piano - WALDORF MICROWAVE XT banc essai keyboards juillet 1998 - WELSON GLOBE TROTTER banc essai disc international septembre 1979 & pub - WELSON METEOR pub - WELSON CONDOR pub - WELSON gamme spinet (princess, comet, music love, granfiesta) pub - WELSON FIESTA & IMPERATIVE 1977 pub - YAMAHA CE20 banc essai claviers février 1983 - YAMAHA série DX brochure - YAMAHA DX5 brochure - YAMAHA DX7 banc essai sono / brochure - YAMAHA DX7 II brochure - YAMAHA DX9 brochure - YAMAHA DX11 brochure - YAMAHA DX21 brochure - YAMAHA FB01 user manual / service manual - YAMAHA QX5 banc essai disc international janvier 1989 - YAMAHA RX5&17 banc essai disc international - YAMAHA RX15 user manual fr / brochure (11&15) / banc essai sono / pattern book (11&15) - YAMAHA REV 100 user manual - YAMAHA CS30 vs KORG MS 20 disc international - YAMAHA CS70M pub 1983 - YAMAHA WALKBAND pub 1981 / pub gamme 1983 - YAMAHA GX1 user manual - YAMAHA YC30 user manual - YAMAHA YC45D service manual / user manual - YAMAHA Série 100 pub 1989 - YAMAHA catalogue series producer 1983 - YAMAHA catalogue series producer 1985 - YAMAHA catalogue 1984 - YAMAHA brochure gamme 1982 / pub 1982 - YAMAHA pub 1 1979 / pub 2 1979 AMPLIFICATION - LAB series L5 L7 L9 L11 schematics - LAB L5 pub AMPLIFICATION LESLIE (ou effet leslie) - DYNACORD DC200 H pub 1976 - ROTOR-SOUND CSE 80M pub - POLYTONES electronic rotating sound modulator pub keyboards 1984 - ECHOLETTE M IVE brochure - LESLIE/CABINES A SON TOURNANT banc essai disc international - NEO INSTRUMENTS VENTILATOR user manual - ROLAND REVO 250 / 120 pub - HUGHES KETTNER/ROTOSPHERE - MOTION SOUND PRO 3 keyboards mai 1997 - LESLIE STORY article de Stéphane Bredel - LES CABINES LESLIE modÚles,achat, cablage, accessoires, entretien ECHO BANDES - LES CHAMBRES D'ECHO et REVERBERATION A BANDES mécanisme disc janvier 1976 - BANC ESSAI CHAMBRES ECHO à BANDES disc janvier 1976 VOCODER - ANALOG LAB VOCODER X-32 user manual / sons - DYNACORD SRV 66 vocoder user manual / schematics / MP3 demo - ELECTRO HARMONIX EH300 VOCODER manual / schematics - EMS VOCODER 2000 banc essai disc international mai 1979 - KORG VC10 banc essai disc international mai 1979 - ROLAND SVC 350 banc essai sono - SYNTOVOX SPX216 extrait catalogue music land - SYNTOVOX 222 banc essai disc international décembre 1979 - LES VOCODERS disc international mai 1979 DIVERS CONTROLEURS MIDI - FROSTWAVE FAT CONTROLLER user manual - J.L.COOPER CS10-2 user manual - KEYFAX PHATBOY banc essai keyboards décembre 1998 - BLUE SKY LOGIC MIXI user manual - PEAVEY 1600 user manual / Patchs pour 1600 - PEAVEY 1600X user manual / Patchs pour 1600X - PEAVEY 1600X banc essai keyboards mars 1998 - ZENDRUM ZX user manual DIVERS MIDI (ACCESSOIRES) - KENTON ELECTRONICS PRO II intégrale DIVERS MODULAIRE - EUROPAC rational/ SCHROFF catalogue DIVERS SYNTHE - Les synthétiseurs de A à Z sono (article en 2 parties) - Les synthétiseurs hifi stéréo septembre 1976 de E.Lemery - SynthÚse sonore 1Úre partie - SynthÚse sonore 2Úme partie - SynthÚse sonore 3Úme partie - SynthÚse sonore 4Úme partie - Le vcf - Le bruit de J.P.Verpeaux (claviers) - Le suiveur d'enveloppe de J.P.Verpeaux (claviers) - Sample hold1 / sample hold2 (1983) - Mon premier "appareil" clavier octobre 1981 - Le compresseur - Les sequenceurs (guitares claviers J.P Verpeaux 1985) + le sequenceur apprivoisé (claviers) - Le modulateur de J.P. Verpeaux (claviers) - 10 ans de synthétiseur J.Sanjuan Hifi stéréo 1978 - 2éme disco forum matériel tournée F.Rimbert/korg - History of electronic sound modification H.Bode - La synthÚse du son de E.Lemery - disc international novembre 1979 - Vangelis, victoire sur les vibrations - Alain dister - claviers mai 1981 - Onze nouveaux synthétiseurs mis en fiches - claviers mars 1982 - 120 years of electronic music - Les instruments de musique électronique (E.Lemery - hifi stéréo mai 1976) - Les principes de base piezo électricité, magnétisme et électrostatique (E.Lemery) - Martin Newcomb, the collector - Future Music - Rhythmic control of analog sequencer polyphony septembre/octobre 1978 - Introduction aux techniques de synthese du son S.Natkin 2003 - Electronic musical instruments "a survey of the commercial scene" - Pratical electronic supplements novembre 1972 - Francis Rimbert démonstrateur korg (au début...) - Richard Wright & Pink floyd - Keyboard, synthesizer & electronics equipment - ver 1.56 - ONDIOLINE PUB - MELLOTRON prix janvier 1976 - MIDI CODE HEX fabricants - MIDI PITCH - NOTE FREQUENCY - LAG LE KEY pub et banc essai computer music - Will systems MAB 303 banc essai keyboards mai 1997 - MULTIVOX pub gamme décembre 1979 DIVERS ORGUES - ELEX gamme pub 1976 - GIBSON G101 user manual / service manual - GIBSON P2 service manual - KUSTOM ORGAN brochure - RIHA JUPITER 2 pub 1977 - RIHA gamme variété pub 1978 - RIHA ORCHESTRA pub 1979 - Evolution de l'orgue électronique disc international décembre 1978 - Répertoire midi : les orgues - MILTON les orgues pub disc international - L'orgue photoélectronique FOTOSONOR - Anatomie de l'orgue électronique Hifi Stéréo juin 1976 de E.Lemery DIVERS PEDALES EFFETS - ARIA pub gamme effets 1983 - DOD pub gamme effets 1979 - REDSON 7pédales effets banc essai sono janvier 1982 DIVERS EFFETS - ELECTRIX EQ killer user manual - ELECTRIX filter factory user manual - ELECTRIX filter factory keyboards juillet 1999 - ELECTRIX filter queen user manual - ELECTRIX mo fx user manual - ELECTRIX warp factory user manual - ELECTRIX repeater user manual - ELECTRIX banc essai warp/filter /mofx computer music 1999 - EVENTIDE BABY HARMONIZER HM80 banc essai claviers octobre 1981 - DIGITECH DSP128 keyboards juillet 1999 - DBX catalogue 1980 (ou 78 pas sur ...) - ROCKTRON HUSH IIC banc essai disc international mai 1987 - ROLLING REC5/COSMIC AE 7000/ZOOM ER 200 banc essai sono - T.C ELECTRONIC 2290 banc essai disc international mai 1987 - PUBLISON DHM 92-B2 banc essai disc international septembre 1979 - PUBLISON RELIEF ENLARGER banc essai sono 1983 - Principe fondamentaux des effets (E.Lemery) 1981 DIVERS ENREGISTREMENT - AKAI 4000 DS MKII user manual - AKAI 4000 DS brochure et banc essai hifi stéréo octobre 1975 - AKAI GX 635D service manual - AKAI GX 646 service manual - TASCAM 22-2 & 22-4 banc essai sono janvier 1982 - TASCAM 688 user manual - TASCAM 388 studio8 user manual - TASCAM A34 service manual - TEAC 3440 user manual - OTARI MX 5050 1/2 QXHD - TEAC A 3440 banc essai disc international - CHOISIR SA TABLE DE MIXAGE disc international novembre 1979 - LES TETES MAGNETIQUES DIVERS BOITE A RYTHME / PERCUSSION - RYTHMATIC MARS ou HENCOT brochure / manual - PEARL DRUMX banc essai guitares claviers - PEARL SC20/SC40 user manual - PEARL SYNCUSSION 1 user manual - SOUNDMASTER STIX ST305 test guitares claviers mai 1984 - SOUDMASTER STIX ST305 pub keyboards novembre 1983 - SYNTOBA RAMEAU - SYNDRUM test DISC international - SYNARE pub / banc essai disc international juillet 1981 - SYNARE 3 banc essai disc international - CAPELLE KLONE KIT 2 banc essai claviers octobre 1984 DIVERS INCLASSABLE - DIGITAR CHARLIE LAB brochure - MARANTZ pianocorder brochure distribution hamm DIVERS BOUTIQUE / CATALOGUES / PRIX - SOMMAIRE SONO magazine du 1 au 95 - PHONORGAN pub DIVERS LIVRES - HISTOIRE DE LA MUSIQUE - Casterman - 1972 - CLAVIERS - Edts J.M.G - 1989 - LE MONDE DU POP ROCK - HATIER - 1977 - CATALOGUE Studio Robert Schroeder LIENS - User & service manual sur le site de pharmacon : http://www.cem3374.com/archive.htm - Les pubs sur :http://retrosynthads.blogspot.com/
http://www.studio250.fr/accueildocs.html

944 BBC News - Structure of stars revealed by 'music' they emit
The sounds emitted by stars light years away from Earth have been captured by British astronomers using Nasa's Kepler space telescope.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13009718

921 Tapeline.info - Content
Established in 1985 ~ Serving the Audio and Video industry for over 25 years News, news, New, new, Technology, technology, Headlines, headlines, Nuke, nuke, PHP-Nuke, phpnuke, php-nuke, Geek, geek, Geeks, geeks, Hacker, hacker, Hackers, hackers, Linux, linux, Windows, windows, Software, software, Download, download, Downloads, downloads, Free, FREE, free, Community, community, MP3, mp3, Forum, forum, Forums, forums, Bulletin, bulletin, Board, board, Boards, boards, PHP, php, Survey, survey, Kernel, kernel, Comment, comment, Comments, comments, Portal, portal, ODP, odp, Open, open, Open Source, OpenSource, Opensource, opensource, open source, Free Software, FreeSoftware, Freesoftware, free software, GNU, gnu, GPL, gpl, License, license, Unix, UNIX, *nix, unix, MySQL, mysql, SQL, sql, Database, DataBase, Blogs, blogs, Blog, blog, database, Mandrake, mandrake, Red Hat, RedHat, red hat, Slackware, slackware, SUSE, SuSE, suse, Debian, debian, Gnome, GNOME, gnome, Kde, KDE, kde, Enlightenment, enlightenment, Interactive, interactive, Programming, programming, Extreme, extreme, Game, game, Games, games, Web Site, web site, Weblog, WebLog, weblog, Guru, GURU, guru, Oracle, oracle, db2, DB2, odbc, ODBC, plugin, plugins, Plugin, Plugins
http://www.tapeline.info/site/modules.php?name=Content&pa=showpage&pid=6

884 jh_polykorg_clone
I have started to build a (slightly) updated version of the Korg PS-3200 synthesizer. The PS-3200 was the last of three fully polyphonic, semi-modular analogue synthesizers offered by Korg in the late 70's. (See Ben Ward's excellent Korg PS site for detailed information, including user manuals.) The concept of the PS-Synthesizers was different from other manufacturer's early polyphonic instruments. Instead of using a small number of voices and a clever keyboard assigning circuit, the "PolyKorgs" had a complete synthesizer circuit, hard wired to each key. That makes a total of 48 VCFs, 48 VCAs and 48 voltage controlled ADSRs even for the smallest of the range, the PS-3100. The largest of the range, PS-3300, even had 144 of these circuits. The sheer number of synthesizer circuits called for an extremly economic circuit design, and it's a joy to look at Korg's design ideas which led to building blocks that almost did the same as in the better known "classic" synthesizers. And after many years of engineering and reverse-engineering electronic music circuits, I have learned to look at odd solutions not as "substandard", but as a source of creativity an individual character. Here's a list of some highlights: Function Implementation Side effects Single-Transistor Waveform Converter creates triangle, saw, pulse and PWM from saw input, using one (!) transistor, one diode and two resistors per voice, plus two global control voltages Pulse height also changes with pulse width 5-Transistor-VCF (Korg-35) A Voltage controlled 2-pole (Sallen&Key) LPF built from 5 transistors rather high CV feedthru Single-Diode VC Resonance The dynamic resistance of a simple diode is used to alter the feedback gain of the VCF limited range of Q "Expand" function instead of VCF Envelope modulation depth Instead of scaling down the ADSR with a VCA, the a variable portion of the Envelope is just clipped with a single diode. It's so remarkably close to ordinary VCA function that apparently nobody takes notice. At least I have not read about it anywhere. At slow Atack times, the Envelope appears delayed at the VCF (no effect until th eclipping point is reached). Usefull for Brass sounds, and not easy to emulate with conventional synthesizers. Minimum parts count Voltage Controlled ADSR Three transistors, 1/2 of a LM324 and one CD4007 per voice. Plus some more involved control circuit, shared by several voices Transistors must be selected in 13-tuples, not just in pairs. ADSR detail (1): One-opamp control logic 1/4 LM324 is used as Flipflop, which is dynamically set by Gate-ON, dynamically reset by Gate-OFF, statically reset when the attack peak voltage is reached, and whose set/reset sensitivity is altered by a CV Very odd "Hold" function, depending on the "Attack"-value. But very useful in practise. ADSR detail (2): Single-Transistor, exponential slope VC-Decay Using a single transistor per voice for VC Attack and Release is remarkable already, even though the A and R slopes are linerar. But the Decay slope is exponential, and this is achieved with a single transistor and two resistors per voice! The Decay time range is rather limited. No ultra fast Decay, and no ultra slow Decay either. Single-Transistor VCA That's the "Korg standard" VCA, well known from other instruments like the MS-10.
http://jhaible.de/polykorg/jh_polykorg_clone.html

872 Boomkat - Your independent music specialist
Boomkat - A specialist music website selling VINYLs, CDs, DVDs and DIGITAL DOWNLOADS, brought to you by a dedicated team who have been operating in this field for 10 years - building up a huge resource of information and opinion about music that exists beyond the radar... Our product extends to cover the most underground forms of Electronic music, Hip Hop, Post-Folk, Alt.Country, IDM, Electro, Acoustica, Post-Rock, Ambient, Micro House, Detroit Techno, Mentalism, Electropop, Indiepop, Grime, Free Jazz, Modern Composition, Cologne Techno, Future Disco, Drone, Sublow, Soundtracks, Noise and out and out post-generic objects of wonder. Electronic Music, Electronica, IDM, Warp, Autechre, Aphex Twin, Boards Of Canada, Arovane, Bola, Experimental, Dance, Dance Music, Records, Vinyl, Skam, CCO, Morr Music, Kid 606, Isan, City Centre Offices, Pole, Matmos, Anticon, Mush, Schematic, Drexciya, Hip Hop, Mille Plateaux, VVM, Ryoji Ikeda, Fennesz, Mego, Raster Noton, Rephlex, Squarepusher, Skanfrom, Marumari, Force Inc, Stereolab, Herbert, Geiom, Neo Ouija, Tzadik, Team Doyobi, Black Dog, Ulrich Schnauss, Opiate, Bjork, Thrill Jockey, Scape, Gonzales, Benge, Toytronic, Gimmik, Abfahrt Hinwil, Kompakt, Berlin, Tigerbeat 6, Cex, Twerk, Neuton, Maurizio, Tikiman, Prefuse 73, Akufen, Cologne, A-Musik, Boomkat, Boomcat
http://boomkat.com/

871 Get familiar with HTML5! - Dev.Opera
Dev.Opera article: Get familiar with HTML5! developer,article,html, wsc,html5,web standards curriculum,open web Introduction Most of the web standards curriculum is based on the last stable version of HTML — HTML 4.01. The HTML 4.01 spec was completed in 1999, over 10 years ago as of the time of this writing! But unless you've been hiding under a rock for the last year or so, you'll be well aware that there is a new version of HTML in production — HTML5! So why have we been teaching you HTML 4.01 in spite of this? In this article we'll answer this question, and many more. We'll give you the essential background you need to know on why HTML5 came about, and where it is up to now. We'll advise you on how it can fit into your learning right now, even if you are a novice web designer or developer, and we will look at some of the main features of HTML5, so you can see what it adds to the already powerful HTML language.
http://dev.opera.com/articles/view/get-familiar-with-html5/

778 Electronic Musical Instrument 1870 - 1990
electronic music content
http://120years.net/nav.html

756 Matmos - Supreme Balloon
The arcs of rising and falling pitches that start this song reminded us of a rainbow, and the title stuck: any resemblance to fluttering symbols of homo-nationalist pride are side effects. People have asked us about the Latin kitsch aspect of the song, and we plead guilty to a great love of the Richard Hayman "The Genuine Electric Latin Love Machine" Moog novelty LP from 1969. Having lived in the Mission District of San Francisco for seven years up until our recent move to Baltimore, we have had enough casual exposure to actual Mexican and Salvadorean music to know that this bears only the faintest relation to the real thing. Keith Fullerton Whitman contributed some tasty squelches and zaps from his Doepfer modular synth to brighten the corners, but not everything on here is that high-tech. Consider the lowly stylophone, a handheld novelty instrument popular with British schoolkids that was immortalized during the rave era in the cheesy techno banger "Stylophonia" by the fabulously named UK crew Two Little Boys. The stylophone that is played on this record was sent to us in the mail by a well-wisher and we thank him for this unexpected present. We are even more grateful to Safety Scissors, who forgave us when M. C. Schmidt broke his MS-20 filter knob by tweaking it too vigorously while recording the "horn" part of this song. It's all been patched up now.
http://www.brainwashed.com/common/htdocs/discog/ole799.php?site=matmos

691 visualizing.org
Visualizing.org is a community of creative people working to make sense of complex issues through data and design
 and it’s a shared space and free resource to help you achieve this goal. Why Visualizing.org? By some estimates, we now create more data each year than in the entirety of prior human history. Data visualization helps us approach, interpret, and extract knowledge from this information. Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen government agencies, NGOs, and companies open up their data for the public to see and use. And we’ve seen data visualization figure more prominently in design curricula, conference programs, and the media. We created Visualizing.org because we want to help connect the proliferation of public data
 with a community that can help us understand this data
 with the general public. What is Visualizing.org? What can I do on the site? For designers: Visualizing is a place to showcase your work, get feedback, ensure that your work is seen by lots of people and gets used by teachers, journalists, and conference organizers to help educate the public about various world issues Visualizing is a free resource to search for data Use Visualizing to keep up with and be inspired by the latest work from other designers and design schools Learn about new visualization tools, blogs, books and other resources to help your work Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike License For teachers and schools: Visualizing is a place to exhibit the collective work of your students, organize assignments and class projects, and help your students find data for their own visualizations We’re working on new tools to help you share teaching material with other teachers As an Academic Partner, your students are eligible to participate in various design competitions – we’re hosting the first Visualizing Marathon in New York in October To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For bloggers and journalists: Visualizing is a resource to find data visualizations about a wide variety of world issues to inform and accompany your own reporting – and it’s easy to embed visualizations and widgets from Visualizing on your own site For conference organizers: As a Knowledge Partner, Visualizing allows you to use data visualizations at your conferences under a Creative Commons License To learn more, contact Saira Jesani For all: Visualizing is a new and fun online resource to learn more about the world in all its complexity and inter-dependence -- and become more comfortable with data and how it can be visually represented How does it work? The site is open and free to use. Everything you upload remains your sole and exclusive property and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. Simply put, this means that anyone can share, copy, remix, or build upon the visualization as long as: (i) it is used non-commercially; and (ii) the visualization’s creator and source are credited.
http://www.visualizing.org/

679 Trevor Marshall's ETI3600, ETI4600 International Music Synthesisers and Maplin 3800 and Maplin 5600s Stereo Synthesisers
Many years ago the Australian magazine "Electronics Today International" published my designs for two partly digital, mostly analog, Electronic Music Synthesisers. the ETI 3600 and ETI 4600. Both were made available as kits of components Barry Wilkinson at ETI was responsible for the final packaging and kitting coordination. Maplin Electronics Ltd.(in the UK) subsequently picked up the designs, which they marketed as as the Maplin models 3800 and 5600s Electronic Music Synthesisers At the time I held two Australian provisional patents for the technologies I used in the Synthesiser designs. One related to the method for generating sawtooth waveforms, the other was for the method of using commutated resistors in voltage controlled filters. I never made any money out of the designs, or the patents, which have long ago been allowed to lapse. But it was fun! The original constructional articles for the ETI 3600/4600 can be found in these PDFs: October 1973, December 1973, January 1974, Feb 1974, March 1974, April 1974, July 1974, March 1975, April 1975, May 1975, August 1975 Although the earliest (4004) microprocessors were available at that time, it was not until the late-70's that I first started programming fully digital (Signetics 2650 based) Microcomputer systems. Consequently my early digital designs were hardware, and not firmware, based. Of course, these days, everything in my hardware and firmware is based on software designs - even the interconnections are controlled by the software in the EPLDs and PALs, instead of by wires. So many things have changed over the years.... Here is a mug shot of the Maplin 3800:
http://www.trevormarshall.com/eti.htm

609 The Next 5 Years in Social Media
What's in store for the future of social media? Trends point to a more connected future built on the backs of today's major social players. features,social media future
http://mashable.com/2010/09/07/next-5-years-social-media/

596 Eventide
Accessories Eventide PitchFactor Support Links â€șDocumentation â€șSoftware Updates â€șPitchFactor Support â€șKnowledge Base â€șForum Find a Dealer No Comparison Nothing Sounds Like an Eventide Through the decades, top players have depended on Eventide: Jimmy Page, Frank Zappa, Brian May, Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai, Robert Fripp, John Petrucci, and Adrian Belew, to name a few. Now, for the first time these effects are portable AND affordable. Stompbox simple, PitchFactor fits on your pedalboard or in your gigbag. Features Specifications Photos Media Studio Quality Effects at Your Feet Top recording studios worldwide use Eventide effects on hit after hit. PitchFactor includes Eventide's best pitch-changing effects from the past 39 years without compromising quality OR flexibility. Flexibility Built-In Plug-and-play expression pedal control of wet/dry mix or any combination of parameters. Control program changes and vary parameters continuously via MIDI. Supports instrument or line level inputs and outputs. Plays well with others; adapts seamlessly with a wide variety of amps and other foot pedals. Obsolescence is so 20th Century Easy to upgrade; download new software from the Internet and install via USB. Features 10 of Eventide’s signature stereo or mono pitch+delay effects: Diatonic PitchFlexℱ Quadravoxℱ Octaverℱ HarModulatorℱ Crystalsℱ MicroPitch HarPeggiatorℱ H910 / H949 Synthonizerℱ Up to 4 voices of diatonic pitch shifting and up to 1.5 seconds of stereo delay Studio quality sound Guitar or bass compatible Built-in Tuner Software upgradeable via USB 2.0 MIDI control via USB or MIDI in, out/thru Instant program change Real-time control with 10 knobs, MIDI, or expression pedal Tap tempo and MIDI clock sync 100 factory presets, unlimited through MIDI True analog bypass Rugged cast metal construction Reliable metal footswitches for instant preset access Mono or stereo operation Guitar or line level inputs and outputs
http://www.eventide.com/AudioDivision/Products/StompBoxes/PitchFactor.aspx

534 Synth Secrets: Links to All Parts
This page contains links to every part of Gordon Reid's hugely popular SYNTH SECRETS series which ran for over five years in Sound On Sound magazine (May 1999 to July 2004). Synthesizers, Synthesisers, synthesis, sound synthesis, analogue synthesis, FM synthesis, digital synthesis, yamaha synth, Roland synth, ARP syths, Prophet synthesizers, Moog synths, sound manipulation, Gordon Reid,
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/allsynthsecrets.htm

484 Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? Answered by Insiders
Why did so many successful entrepreneurs and startups come out of PayPal? I long have been fascinated by the extraordinary achievement from the ex-Paypal team and wonder about the reasons behind their success. In the past, mass media tried to answer this question several times but still couldn’t give us a clear answer. I once asked David Sacks the same question during an event in Los Angeles. He told me the secret is that Paypal has built a “scrappy” culture. No matter what problems they faced, they would find a way to solve them. I kind of got the idea, but was still confused about the execution details. So when I saw some of the past Paypal employees answering this question on Quora, I was super excited! After all, they should be the only ones who can tell people the inside stories. Below are some highlights of their answers. *If you want to check out the sources or leave your comments, please go to here and here. On Talent Management “Peter and Max assembled an unusual critical mass of entrepreneurial talent, primarily due to their ability to recognize young people with extraordinary ability (the median age of *execs* on the S1 filing was 30). But the poor economy allowed us to close an abnormal number of offers, as virtually nobody other than eBay and (in part) google was hiring in 2000-02.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Focus (driven by Peter): Peter required that everyone be tasked with exactly one priority. He would refuse to discuss virtually anything else with you except what was currently assigned as your #1 initiative. Even our annual review forms in 2001 required each employee to identify their single most valuable contribution to the company.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Dedication to individual accomplishment: Teams were almost considered socialist institutions. Most great innovations at PayPal were driven by one person who then conscripted others to support, adopt, implement the new idea. If you identified the 8-12 most critical innovations at PayPal (or perhaps even the most important 25), almost every one had a single person inspire it (and often it drive it to implementation). As a result, David enforced an anti-meeting culture where any meeting that included more than 3-4 people was deemed suspect and subject to immediate adjournment if he gauged it inefficient. Our annual review forms in 2002 included a direction to rate the employee on “avoids imposing on others’ time, e.g. scheduling unnecessary meetings.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Refusal to accept constraints, external or internal:We were expected to pursue our #1 priority with extreme dispatch (NOW) and vigor. To borrow an apt phrase, employees were expected to “come to work every day willing to be fired, to circumvent any order aimed at stopping your dream.” Jeremy Stoppelman has relayed elsewhere the story about an email he sent around criticizing management that he expected to get him fired and instead got him promoted. Peter did not accept no for answer: If you couldn’t solve the problem, someone else would be soon assigned to do it.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Driven problem solvers: PayPal had a strong bias toward hiring (and promoting / encouraging, as Keith mentions) smart, driven problem solvers, rather than subject matter experts. Very few of the top performers at the company had any prior experience with payments, and many of the best employees had little or no prior background building Internet products. I worked on the fraud analytics team at PayPal, and most of our best people had never before done anything related to fraud detection. If he’d approached things “traditionally”, Max would have gone out and hired people who had been building logistic regression models for banks for 20 years but never innovated, and fraud losses would likely have swallowed the company.” (by Mike Greenfield, former Sr. Fraud R&D Scientist of Paypal) “Self-sufficiency – individuals and small teams were given fairly complex objectives and expected to figure out how to achieve them on their own. If you needed to integrate with an outside vendor, you picked up the phone yourself and called; you didn’t wait for a BD person to become available. You did (the first version of) mockups and wireframes yourself; you didn’t wait for a designer to become available. You wrote (the first draft of) site copy yourself; you didn’t wait for a content writer.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) On Culture & Ideology “Extreme bias towards action – early PayPal was simply a really *productive* workplace. This was partly driven by the culture of self-sufficiency. PayPal is and was, after all, a web service; and the company managed to ship prodigious amounts of relatively high-quality web software for a lot of years in a row early on. Yes, we had the usual politics between functional groups, but either individual heroes or small, high-trust teams more often than not found ways to deliver projects on-time.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Willingness to try – even in a data-driven culture, you’ll always run in to folks who either don’t believe you have collected the right supporting data for a given decision or who just aren’t comfortable when data contradicts their gut feeling. In many companies, those individuals would be the death of decision-making. At PayPal, I felt like you could almost always get someone to give it a *try* and then let performance data tell us whether to maintain the decision or rollback.” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Data-driven decision making – PayPal was filled with smart, opinionated people who were often at logger-heads. The way to win arguments was to bring data to bear. So you never started a sentence like this “I feel like it’s a problem that our users can’t do X”, instead you’d do your homework first and then come to the table with “35% of our [insert some key metric here] are caused by the lack of X functionality
” (by Yee Lee, former Product & BU GM of Paypal) “Radical transparency on metrics: All employees were expected to be facile with the metrics driving the business. Otherwise, how could one expect each employee to make rational calculations and decisions on their own every day? To enforce this norm, almost every all-hands meeting consisted of distributing a printed Excel spreadsheet to the assembled masses and Peter conducting a line by line review of our performance (this is only a modest exaggeration).” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Vigorous debate, often via email: Almost every important issue had champions and critics. These were normally resolved not by official edict but by a vigorous debate that could be very intense. Being able to articulate and defend a strategy or product in a succinct, compelling manner with empirical analysis and withstand a withering critique was a key attribute of almost every key contributor. I still recall the trepidation I confronted when I was informed that I needed to defend the feasibility of my favorite “baby” to Max for the first time.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal) “Extreme Pressure – PayPal was a very difficult business with many major issues to solve. We were able to see our colleagues work under extreme pressure and hence we learned who we could rely on and trust.” (by Keith Rabois, former Executive Vice President of Paypal)
http://primitus.com/blog/why-did-so-many-successful-entrepreneurs-and-startups-come-out-of-paypal-answered-by-insiders/

476 Top 15+ Best Practices for Writing Super Readable Code | Nettuts+
Code readability is a universal subject in the world of computer programming. It’s one of the first things we learn as developers. Readable and maintainable code is something to be proud of in a finished product. We can share it with others, contribute to other projects, and reuse code from applications we wrote months or even years ago. This article will detail the fifteen most important best practices when writing readable code.
http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/html-css-techniques/top-15-best-practices-for-writing-super-readable-code/

441 How To Become a Millionaire In Three Years | Jason L. Baptiste
/* This was originally a comment made in response to a hacker news thread titled:  Ask HN: How to become a millionaire in 3 years? .  The comment has over must reads,startups
http://jasonlbaptiste.com/startups/how-to-become-a-millionaire-in-three-years/

440 A List Apart: Articles: Taking Advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 with Modernizr
Ten years ago, only the most cutting-edge web designers used CSS for layouts and styling. Browser support for CSS layouts was slim and buggy, so these people advocated for web standards adherence, while creating hacks that made CSS layouts work in all browsers. One hack that became widely used was browser sniffing: Detecting which browser and version the user had by looking at the navigator.userAgent property in JavaScript. Browser sniffing allowed for quick and easy code forking, allowing developers to target different browsers with different instructions. Today, CSS-based layouts are commonplace and every browser has pretty solid support for them. But now we have CSS3 and HTML5, and the situation is repeating itself—different browsers demonstrate varying levels of support for these new technologies. We’ve smartened up, however, and no longer employ CSS hacks nor use browser sniffing—an unreliable, poor practice. We’ve also convinced more and more clients that websites don’t need to look exactly the same in every browser. So how do we deal with this new but familiar problem? Simple: We use feature detection, which means that we do not ask the browser “who are you?” and make unreliable assumptions from there on. Instead we ask the browser, “can you do this and that?” It’s a simple way to test browser capabilities, but doing all these tests manually all the time gets tiresome. To solve that problem (and others), you can use Modernizr.
http://www.alistapart.com/articles/taking-advantage-of-html5-and-css3-with-modernizr/

428 Alain Neffe and the Home-Taped Electronic Music Revolution
Alain Neffe launched his first tape label at home in Belgium in 1981. He called it Insane Music Contact and his first installment was called Insane Music for Insane People. Thus began a nearly thirty year foray into home-made, visionary and utterly unfashionable electronic music that has hardly made anyone involved a household name. Insane Music released 55 titles in its most prolific years (1981-87). Five of these were vinyl records and the rest were cassettes tapes. Why cassettes tapes? Magnetic tape was the obvious solution to the problem facing many artists working without record contracts in those days. Cassettes could be recorded at home, produced at home, dubbed at home, and sold or traded by mail. No need for tasteless outside producers and marketing mojo—one needed only leave home to buy more tapes. Says Neffe, “I could copy the tapes on demand. Releasing an LP required that you print 500 copies and 1000 copies of the cover sleeve, and everything had to be paid up front 
 if the buyer didn’t like the music, he or she could wipe it out and record something else on it.” Mr. Neffe was not the only one out there recording, selling and trading tapes by mail. On both sides of the Atlantic, home cassette technology was permitting the release of much groundbreaking and breathlessly beautiful work, as well as some noxious and otherwise self-indulgent wanking—that coat of many colors we call the DIY (do-it-yourself) Revolution. As early as 1974, Albrecht/d. self-released a cassette entitled Amsterdam Op De Dam in Germany. In 1976, Throbbing Gristle was distributing tapes of their infamous live recordings, and in 1977, the French electro-industrial unit Die Form began releasing tapes on their own Bain Total label. 1980 saw the release of two monumental self-released cassettes, The Storm Bugs’ A Safe Substitute and Colin Potter’s The Ghost Office. In Japan, 1980 saw the release of Merzbow’s first two cassettes, Remblandt Assemblage and Fuckexercise. And in the USA, 1981 saw John Bender’s Plaster: The Prototypes, a laconic and mysterious series of tone and vocal poems. Home taping was not limited to electronic music. R. Stevie Moore, one of the elder living ancestors of the lo-fi rock aesthetic, began releasing distributing home-made tapes via the R. Stevie Moore Cassette Club sometime in the 1970s. And tapes of live punk shows from the era continue to trade hands. Soon, cassettes were coming from everywhere: mysterious PO boxes in the Midwest, to which you sent a blank tape and three dollars and received the tape back with something on it. The Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine was a Fluxus-inspired subscription audio-journal dedicated to music as well as poetry and drama and other forms of audio-art. Zines like Factsheet Five and Unsound devoted entire columns to the material they received from bands on home-made cassette, and demo tapes began leaking to radio stations prior to official record release dates. It was a grassroots movement that marched in association with the self-publication of zines, comics, chapbooks, and other media. The medium had begun to become the message. Insane Music for Insane People (which eventually reached 25 volumes) was a series compiling all home-made electronic music made by artists from across the globe. By including in the liner notes the contact address for each artist featured, Neffe helped pioneer a snail-mail network for those interested in more of what they heard. Artists from all over Europe and the USA, from Japan, New Zealand, and beyond contributed over the years. One could send a few dollars to Insane Music Contact, receive tapes in the mail, write to artists involved and receive more cassettes. Insane Music Contact (now known as Insane Music) has always been a vehicle for Mr. Neffe’s own electronic music projects as well, many of which are periodically active to this day. Though he now makes liberal use of the CD format, Neffe’s artistic approach remains undiluted by years of underexposure. He expects very little acknowledgment of or remuneration for his efforts, which, for him, are emotional articulation, continued experimentation, and purity. It seems nothing but nothing could possibly catapult such heavily uncommercial sounds into the public consciousness–not even this thirty-year retrospective box-set entitled The Insane Box released (ironically, on vinyl) by the venerable Frank Maier of Vinyl-on-Demand Records, an outfit devoted to preserving the precious gems of cassette culture before the evidence disintegrates. For this retrospective (4 LPs + a 7” 45), Mr. Neffe has reached into dusty attic boxes, wherein lay unreleased (or hardly available) material by five projects of which he has been a part: BeNe GeSSeRiT, Human Flesh, Pseudo Code, I Scream and Subject. Each has a unique cerebral orientation and emotional vibe made possible by the combined efforts of invited guests; each runs the high fever of a man very much committed to a personal vision of artistic purity without virtuosity, and each is distinctly French. BeNe GeSSeRiT was not the first of Mr. Neffe’s projects to be recorded and distributed, but is, to my understanding, the genesis of his approach to music as “texts” or “photographs”, or as he puts it, “potlatch music”. On these early tracks we also detect a burgeoning interest in the endless expressive properties of the human voice, both explicitly human and as heavily-treated sound sculpture, both French and English At times, voices shout like besotted Celine parlor workers at each other from tenement windows; at other times a high-pitched female voice wails up and down like Catherine Ribeiro alone in her bathroom. In these tracks, one can also detect the half-digested influence of electro-rock luminaries Silver Apples, the avant-lashings a la Yoko Ono, and occasionally the thunder-beat of early Laibach. Primitive Casio electronics, stage whispers, delay echoes, tape loops, and a certain absurdist humor redolent of Erik Satie, neither dampen the fabric with melodrama, nor detract from the integrity of the grist, nor from the topical seriousness of the text’s subjects. BeNe GeSSeRiT is difficult music, even in the moments that risk elegy, yet it is still more accessible than some of the other Francophone avant-dada outfits of the day, such as DDAA and Étant DonnĂ©s, or Nurse with Wound in the UK. Human Flesh is decidedly more structurally cohesive and song-oriented than BeNe GeSSeRiT, and its predecessors and influences are less clear. Still there is a clear interest in the human voice, its textures and timbers when removed of sign value by backwards-masking, and the new textures that emerge when disassembled and reassembled. Even rock-oriented at times, Human Flesh chases a more delirious climax, for the hounds of the carnival are snapping at their heels as they run. This is also a project of varied angles and pursuits, sliding as it does into poetic electro-pop (the supple and Chicago-accented voice of the late Lydia Tomkiw, of Algebra Suicide, appears on two tracks), and moments of Half Japanese-style primitivism. The side-long track “Langsam” is more reminiscent of Piper-era Pink Floyd and Brainticket, as well as other Krautrock, yet is still distinctly French. These early and rare tracks are, in contrast to the more ambitious Pseudo Code and the more intimate recordings by I Scream, more oblique for being a mix-down of materials sent to Neffe from artists around the globe. The track “Sons of God?” is also notable for what is perhaps the first recorded sample of the American fire-and-brimstone preacher Ferrell Griswold, whose voice has appeared in music by Front 242, Phallus Dei, Pragha Khan, et cetera. The cassette medium, for all its benefits to individual artistic expression and culture, is for the selfsame reasons impermanent. Magnetic tape has a thirty year lifespan if properly archived, which means both that preserving their contents in other formats is important, and that paying hundreds of dollars for the original artifacts is a questionable collectors’ pursuit (nevertheless, you can watch it happen daily). With the advent of the mp3 and the efforts of Vinyl-on-Demand and other labels, Insane Music’s CD-r reissue program included, some of this exquisite material has been rescued from oblivion.
http://www.timesquotidian.com/2010/05/28/alain-neffe-and-the-home-taped-electronic-music-revolution/

392 50 New Useful CSS Techniques, Tools and Tutorials - Smashing Magazine
Over the last years we've got a pretty good understanding of what CSS does, how it works and how we can use it for our layouts, typography and visual presentation of... web design, magazine, html, photoshop, wordpress, wallpaper, icons
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/06/10/50-new-useful-css-techniques-tools-and-tutorials/

366 How to Track Down Anyone Online
When you're trying to find someone online, Google's not the only game in town. In the last two years, a handful of new people search engines have come onto the scene that offer better ways to pinpoint people info by name, handle, location, or place of employment. While there's still no killer, one-stop people search, there are more ways than ever to track down a long-lost friend, stalk an ex, or screen a potential date or employee. The next time you wonder, "What ever happened to so-and-so?" you've got a few power people search tools to turn to. How to Track Down Anyone Online, software, productivity, technology, downloads, life hacks, hacker, lifehacks, computing, lifestyle, timesavers, health, internet, personal technology, DIY, projects, tricks, advice, backup, email, Mac, Windows, Firefox, Google, Yahoo, Gmail, keyboard shortcuts, household, HOWTO, how to's, tutorials
http://lifehacker.com/329033/how-to-track-down-anyone-online/

298 The Evolution of Privacy on Facebook
Facebook is a great service. I have a profile, and so does nearly everyone I know under the age of 60. However, Facebook hasn't always managed its users' data well. In the beginning, it restricted the visibility of a user's personal information to just their friends and their "network" (college or school). Over the past couple of years, the default privacy settings for a Facebook user's personal information have become more and more permissive. They've also changed how your personal information is classified several times, sometimes in a manner that has been confusing for their users. This has largely been part of Facebook's effort to correlate, publish, and monetize their social graph: a massive database of entities and links that covers everything from where you live to the movies you like and the people you trust. This blog post by Kurt Opsahl at the the EFF gives a brief timeline of Facebook's Terms of Service changes through April of 2010. It's a great overview, but I was a little disappointed it wasn't an actual timeline: hence my initial inspiration for this infographic.
http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/

263 Facebook's Eroding Privacy Policy: A Timeline | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Since its incorporation just over five years ago, Facebook has undergone a remarkable transformation. When it started, it was a private space for communication with a group of your choice. Soon, it transformed into a platform where much of your infor...
http://w2.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/facebook-timeline/

259 9 Useful PHP Functions and Features You Need to Know | Nettuts+
Even after using PHP for years, we stumble upon functions and features that we did not know about. Some of these can be very useful, yet underused. Not all of
http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/9-useful-php-functions-and-features-you-need-to-know/

78 Mandelbulb: The Unravelling of the Real 3D Mandelbrot Fractal
TIMESTAMP 08/11/2009. The original Mandelbrot is an amazing object that has captured the public's imagination for 30 years with its cascading patterns and hypnotically colourful detail. It's known as a 'fractal' - a type of shape that yields (sometimes elaborate) detail forever, no matter how far you 'zoom' into it (think of the trunk of a tree sprouting branches, which in turn split off into smaller branches, which themselves yield twigs etc.).
http://www.skytopia.com/project/fractal/mandelbulb.html

67 The Audio Playground Synthesizer Museum
The Audio Playground webpages offer a virtual tour of the collection and shows some of the the electronic instruments and gadgets which have shaped popular (and not so popular) music through the years -- from the earliest innovations, to more recent toys. Enjoy!
http://www.keyboardmuseum.com/play.html

101 - 201